Latest Articles in Commercial Glass

  • Less severe losses than U.S. in 2009 and 2010
    Canada is certainly not immune to the recession that began in the United States and spread throughout the world. However, the country is expected to face less severe losses during the next two years than its American neighbor
  • Rising construction material prices—particularly for metals—have been a top concern of glass industry representatives for several years.
  • Nonresidential construction forecast looks bleak with some bright spots
    U.S. economic growth will be slow through 2010, leading to two or three tough years for the construction industry, Jim Haughey, chief economist, Reed Construction Data, Norcross, Ga., said Oct. 15 during Reed Construction Data’s 2009 forecast webinar. “There will be a depressing on the economy for several years. But … the crisis aspect of the [economy] goes away quickly and we...
  • Spotlight on your profits
    U.S. economic forecasts have gone from bad to worse, and the phrases “falling dollar,” “possible recession,” “credit crunch” and “rising prices” have entered into the everyday vocabulary of many Americans. It seems as if the much-discussed economic stimulus rebate checks won’t quite provide the necessary boost to turn things around immediately.
  • Experts present varied review of U.S. economy at Reed 2008 Forecast Conference
     When developing a business plan for 2008, consider hedging your bets. Economists at the Reed 2008 Construction Forecast Conference gave the U.S. economy and the outlook for the construction industry mixed reviews. The conference took place Oct. 3-4 in Washington, D.C.   The cautionary note “was sobering, but it adds balance” to the forecast, says Michael F. Maher,...
  • Industry will require more than 50 new lines to keep up with flat glass need
     World demand for flat glass is forecast to rise 5.2 percent per year through 2010 to 6.1 billion square meters. Maintaining the trend seen over the 2000-2005 period, demand will outpace real, i.e., inflation-adjusted, gains in the global economy. Production of flat glass is projected to increase 5.4 percent per year through 2010 to 57.3 million metric tons, of which approximately 45-50...
  • How best to compete on a global basis and maintain current market
     The economy is ambling along in what a recent Wall Street Journal article called the “Goldilocks Economy”-–not too hot and not to cold. As I write this on Oct. 1, the Dow Jones industrial average is pushing a record, and the 30 component stocks are trading at 19 times their combined earnings per share of the past 12 months. This is well below the 26 price-earning ratio of...
  • Nonresidential market looks up
    The residential market The residential new housing market showed a decline in 2006 for the first time since 2001. Although this decline has been forecasted for the past several years, it was more severe than expected. Most forecasters expected a decline in single-family housing in the mid- to upper-single digits, but at the current rate a decline of about 14 percent from 1.71 million homes to 1....
  • Yet after a year of shortages and price hikes, 2006 looks healthy
    Without a catastrophic event, the U.S. commercial construction industry and its participants should see healthy returns in 2006, with overall market growth averaging 4-to-6 percent. At Kawneer North America in Norcross, Ga., company executives see an upbeat economic outlook and have been working with managers of its international parent, Alcoa Inc. of Pittsburgh, to make sure that supplies will...
  • Short term, residential down; commercial, up
    Before looking forward, let’s look back. In our forecast a year ago, Ducker, along with most every other forecaster, underestimated the strength of the U.S. residential construction market. It continued to drive flat-glass demand in 2005 to another strong year.Despite projections of softening in the housing market, starts in 2005 are likely to end up at around 2.15 million, 3.5 percent...
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What's Hot

  • This commercial office space in Tulsa, Okla., features a 42-foot-long, custom, continuous art mural that spans 14 glass panels. 
    Great Glazing: Custom interior officeThis commercial office space in Tulsa, Okla., features a 42-foot-long, custom, continuous art mural that spans 14 glass panels suspended from the ceiling. Created by Tulsa artist May Yang, the mural is based on local Oklahoma themes, transitioning from rural landscape to the Tulsa skyline.   Great Glazing: Joliet Junior College Campus...
  • A look at the leading manufacturers and fabricators of metal products, broken down by sales volume, number of locations and product offering. 
    Building on the success of the Top Glass Fabricators rankings introduced last year, Glass Magazine is expanding its coverage to include the Top Metal Companies, featuring the leading manufacturers and fabricators of metal products in the United States and Canada. The Top Metal Companies include those that manufacture, fabricate and sell curtain wall, storefront and entrance, commercial interior...
  • Read about the winners
    In an effort to spotlight the people who make the Glass Magazine Award-winning products and projects possible, this year’s program included people-centric categories, for which the industry submitted their picks for best installer, production supervisor, project manager and sales rep.After narrowing down the nominations to three finalists in each category, the Glass Magazine editors asked the...