glassblog

Monday, October 13, 2014

In the October issue of Glass Magazine, I looked at the trends in windows for hospitals and healthcare applications. Everyone I spoke with agreed that architects for these projects want more—more windows in larger sizes; windows that offer ever-better energy performance; windows that resist mold; and, of course, windows that are aesthetically pleasing.

Recognizing that daylighting and views improve patient recovery, in addition to employee comfort and productivity, many in the architectural community have made windows a critical element of design in the healthcare segment. However, the special requirements of a hospital setting pose challenges to window manufacturers, particularly in terms of condensation or moisture infiltration. The presence of moisture, and thus the potential for mold, can prove dangerous, even fatal, in such applications.

“The considerations for health care environments mirror the considerations for a majority of window installations: air/water intrusion, thermal conductivity, etc. The difference is the cost of not getting it right,” said Eric S. Enloe, marketing product manager, Efco Corp., www.efcocorp.com, in the article. “In a hospital environment, sensitivities to mold and temperature changes really underscore the need to make sure you have the right product properly installed.”

To promote the advancements window and component manufacturers have made in this arena, we developed a product gallery, Windows for Hospitals and Heathcare Facilities. To have your company’s products included in the gallery, email me, kdevlin [at] glass.org. 

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

I am most optimistic about the glass industry’s ability to create real change in the future of energy-efficient building when I look at the amazing developments of the past 50 years. During that time, glass suppliers have redefined what is possible in energy-efficient glasses, developing increasingly sophisticated and high-performance products for a building industry demanding ever-better performing products. 

Insulating glass and low-emissivity coatings are now a given in new construction, thanks to the R&D at individual companies, and the collective efforts to push energy-efficiency standards and codes from industry organizations. “You’d be shocked if you saw a commercial building going up in North America without low-E glass,” says Glenn Miner, director, construction, PPG Flat Glass.  

The cover story for Glass Magazine’s October issue looks at the history of glass performance—from the first glass coatings such as PPG’s Solarban, through the development and evolution of low-emissivity glasses, to the introduction of dynamic glass products. This history of energy-efficient milestones is documented in a timeline in the magazine, and presented in an interactive feature on GlassMagazine.com.  

Additionally, an online-only feature of the article presents interactive timelines for nine glass companies that have individually and collectively changed the energy-efficient possibilities of the North American glass industry. (See timelines for: AGC Glass Co.; Cardinal Corp.; Guardian Industries; Pleotint; PPG Industries; RavenBrick; Sage Electrochromics; View; and Viracon.)

And the article looks at the future of energy-efficient glass solutions. The glass industry has been dedicated to improving the energy-efficient performance potential of its products for the last five decades. That dedication will only increase in the future. The energy-efficient glass industry of tomorrow will feature more dynamics, triple IGUs, new low-Es (including new fourth-surface products) and warm-edge technologies. And, it will likely include emerging product technologies such as vacuum glazing. 

The glass industry of the next 50 years is certainly a mystery. However, one certainty is that energy-efficiency will remain a top priority. 

(To include your company’s energy-efficient milestones in a timeline, or to update a timeline with new products and developments, feel free to email me directly.) 

Katy Devlin, Editor, Glass Magazine
 
The opinions expressed here and in reader comments are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 6, 2014

It was in October of 2005 that I started blogging. So much has changed in the nine years since, it's actually pretty mind blowing. If you told me when I started this blog that in 2014 I would be on my own and preparing to go to Germany for a trade show, I would have never believed you. Not to mention if you told me HOW some of those nine years were going to play out. That too would have floored me. I guess it’s a good thing to not be able to predict the future sometimes! In any case, to those of you who have supported me and read this blog etc., thank you. I will always be grateful!

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of exciting milestones, a Happy Anniversary to the gang at Morse Industries. The company turned 32 this week. I have a lot of respect for the way they do business and the way they step up to support the industry. Here’s to many many more years!
  • A good friend of mine, and one of the most talented guys in the industry, has a new position with a company making some moves into the market. Donald Press, formerly the general manager for Schott Architecture & Design, is now heading up the new subsidiary of Okalux GmbH called Okalux North America. I know he will do great.
  • Forbes last week listed 1,645 billionaires in the world. Rumor has it one of them is former glass industry wiz Scott Surma. Maybe time for me to call him for a loan…
  • The Efficient Window Collaborative just launched a new app for their window selection tool. As you may know, I am a huge fan of Kerry Haglund and her team, and this app is absolutely off the charts in terms of information and ease of use. Another great tool for the public to use! Props to everyone behind this excellent effort.
  • One issue that Kerry (among others) has hit me up on is the bird control issue with the new Minnesota stadium. Last week the bird issue actually came up, somewhat quietly, with another stadium. Levi’s Stadium, the new home for the 49ers, will pay $70,000 over three years for “bird control” at their new stadium. All I could find on this was a lonely tweet from a local beat writer, but it surely begs the question of exactly what is happening. And could this too have been avoided with glass? Could the Vikings be planning the same?

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 29, 2014

It’s nearly October and it looks to be an extremely busy month. The business climate is very positive right now, and optimism may be at its highest level in several years, leaving everyone at varying levels of “hectic.” Though, I have to admit, I can’t get “don’t repeat the mistakes of the past” out of my mind. Hopefully lessons were truly learned from earlier years.

Several trade shows are also happening, all at the end of the month. The two main shows are Greenbuild in New Orleans and glasstec in Germany. In my estimation, Greenbuild has not been a good show for a while. The lack of floor traffic, exacerbated by minimal quality of said traffic, is a big issue. But since there is a hope of an architect sighting at Greenbuild, people will still exhibit and attend. Given the way business is going right now, Greenbuild should have a good show, but we will see and I’ll wait to hear from those who will be attending.

Across the ocean in Germany is the largest glass show in the world, glasstec.  And for the first time ever, I am attending. From everything I have heard and read, this show is beyond belief. I can’t wait to see it for myself and then report back to all of you. If you are going to glasstec, let me know. It would be great to run into friendly faces while navigating that monster of a multiple-hall set up.

Elsewhere…

  • October also happens to be Breast Cancer Awareness Month and while I despise the NFL’s blatant “Pinkwashing” of this effort, I do believe in supporting it where I can, and believe it has a need. It was very cool to see what the folks at Dip-Tech are doing by creating a special breast cancer awareness sample for their customers’ sample kits. It’s a tremendous idea to cross their product with a noble charitable effort. Great idea to raise awareness in a truly creative way.
  • Time for my ad of the month in Glass Magazine. The latest issue, with a focus on decorative, was tremendous, by the way. We have some seriously talented companies in this industry. Anyway, the ad award for the month goes to GLG Canada for their neat and informative piece on where their glass handling machines can fit into the glass and glazing world. Very eye catching and well done!
  • The Glass Magazine People Award winners were announced in that issue as well. Major congratulations to all of the winners. A special shout out to Dan Pompeo who took the title in what I’d have to assume to be a very competitive Best Sales Rep category. I have known Dan for years and he’s a terrific person all the way around. So happy for him to get this award, but also credit and props should go to his wife, Stacey, who happens to be pretty awesome, too!
  • Mixed results on the various monthly forecasting reports…

The Architectural Billings Index continues to be strong though down just a bit from the previous month. So far the past indicators of the ABI have held true. The biggest months in 2013 were the July/August/September combo and that forecast held in the 9-12 month window. But I know many of you will say of this forecast that even a clock is right twice a day; did they just get lucky? Possibly. I can’t rule that out, but for now I’ll take it. 

On the flip side, McGraw Hill’s latest report showed a sharp decline from the previous month though the analysts expected the decline given some of the projects that were incorporated into the previous month's totals. Still, no one wants to see anything with the word “decline” in it. Heading into the winter months it will be very interesting to see how this all continues to progress.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 29, 2014

For the third consecutive year, Glass Magazine will feature the top ranking metal companies in North America in this year's Top Metal Companies list. Highlighted in the November issue of Glass Magazine, the Top Metal Companies include those that manufacture, fabricate and sell curtain wall, storefront and entrance, commercial interior and exterior railings, aluminum composite panels and exterior sun-control products to the glass and glazing industry. While the Top Metal Companies list ranks companies by sales volume, it also provides timely information regarding the state of the metals market as a whole, based on market statistics related to sales volume, product demand and acquisition plans.

The 2014 Top Metal Companies list will showcase the successes, challenges, changes and opportunities within the commercial metals industry. Featuring specific metal company achievements, including recent projects and new metal products, the list provides an up-to-date and comprehensive look at the industry.

If your company belongs on the Top Metal Companies list, be sure to complete the Top Metal Companies survey by Oct. 3, and contact me if you have any questions about participating.

Stough is managing editor of Glass Magazine, write her at bstough@glass.org.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Probably the biggest news coming on the heels of GlassBuild America was Viracon's announcement that it will reopen its St. George, Utah, facility in January. That news, combined with the announced positive performance by Viracon's parent company, gives off serious confidence that the improved economy is more solid than we have all been hoping. There are a handful of companies in the industry that can move the needle, and Viracon is easily one. This news is truly very positive for all. Congrats to all involved.

Elsewhere…

  • The industry lost another icon last week with the passing of Bob Pool, founder and chairman of Thermal Windows. Mr. Pool was a class act, loved by basically everyone who came in contact with him. In his town and company he’ll surely be remembered for many things, but from my standpoint one part of his legacy will stand with the fact that Thermal Windows has been a tremendous supporter of the industry for many years, through the best and worst of times. Thoughts and condolences to Mr. Pool’s family and everyone at Thermal.
  • Lost in my long review of GlassBuild America last week was coverage of the hot products. There were a few things that caught my eye. AGC Glass Co. North America’s Dragontrail, which I previewed pre-show, did not disappoint. I am a fan of solar, always have been, and continue to respect and have high hopes for what Onyx Solar is doing. Plus, there may not be a nicer young man in our industry than Diego Cuevas. The interior switchables were in many spots on the floor, showing that product has legs. This is a good thing, because I probably am asked twice a month where you can find that sort of product.
  • Also at GlassBuild America, I ran into Tara Brummet who just was hired by Vitrum. Great hire for them as Tara is an extremely impressive individual. I will be soon doing a list of my top 20 best industry salespeople and I expect Tara to surely occupy a spot. That list is going to be VERY hard to compile as at the sales level our industry has the most talent than it ever has.  
  • This has been a theme here and elsewhere, but I am seriously tempted to start a school for project managers. The need for that position is so huge, it is not even funny.
  • This week is the Glass Association of North America Fall Conference in Toronto and unfortunately I cannot attend. I am looking forward to hearing about it, as some subjects that will be covered, specifically the bird glazing issue, are extremely important right now. On a side note, it is great to see a GANA meeting in the awesome country of Canada. We are blessed with tremendous industry support from so many Canadian companies; it is great to see them have a home event.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Another GlassBuild America is in the books, and it was an incredible experience. 2014 featured the best crowd in years, amazing education and demos, networking and business transactions. LOTS of business transactions, actually. There is no question in my mind that the momentum and enthusiasm we have in our world right now is very real. Yes, we have obstacles ahead, but things continue to progress in the right direction. And let’s keep in mind the comments that the great Oliver Stepe of YKK AP said in the Glazing Executive Forum at GlassBuild: "Do not forget the lessons of the past. It would be a mistake to go backward. Keep doing more with less. The market is better, yes, but your competition is better, too."

I can’t agree more, as we surely do not want to go backward in the way we operate or approach our businesses. All in all, let’s keep this positive momentum going!

As I have been doing for many years, I share with you here what I saw and noticed on the show floor. This blog is longer than normal, so you are forewarned.

  • Overall- the level and look of the exhibits was amazing!
  • Great to see Mike Gainey of Azon again. And he was looking great, too. The team from Garibaldi Glass was great to catch up with--Carey, Chris, Otto and Neally. A super booth and some really cool cutting edge/impressive products on display. Of course, it's not an industry show if I don’t get to spend a few minutes with Glenn Miner and Joanne Funyak from PPG, though this year it had to be BEFORE the show kicked off because I could not get in their booth during the show due to the crowds. Speaking of busy, my old friend Cliff Monroe of Oldcastle BE was in deep conversation every time I came within 20 feet of him, so never got the chance to chat. Same with Tom O’Malley of Clover Architectural and Steve Cohen of Schott. That’s the only problem with such a packed event, not getting time to chat with everyone. All three guys look like they are doing quite well, though.
  • Good to see Garret Henson and Seth Madole of Viracon holding court on the show floor. Those two just stood in one place and let the show come to them. Nice. The Idaho State Hall of Fame football player Dave Michaeli of AGC was on hand working their booth, which was very sharp by the way. Dave looks like he could suit up for a NFL team right now. Plus, AGC had the legend of Rocky Top Matt Ferguson in attendance as well; wish I could’ve spent more time with him. Very nice to meet Vistamatic boss Kevin Roth in person; I’m a fan of his company's product. And great to run into Devin Bowman from TGP walking the floor; wish I had more time to chat with him. Getting a few minutes to catch up with Lloyd Talbert of C.R. Laurence is always awesome. That company always steps up for the industry and I always make sure to thank Lloyd for that support.
  • The Dip-Tech booth was awesome. Being on the floor early, and seeing it go up from nothing made me appreciate it all the more. And that goes for the entire show. To see the floor a few days before the show opens; it’s an epic disaster. Then by show open, it's absolutely pristine. Kudos to EVERY exhibitor.
  • A fascinating moment for me? Being in the Bottero booth and meeting Kristin Hayes of Luminous Glass Distributors in Miami. She just closed a deal there for a machine and was rightfully fired up. It was very nice to meet her and witness firsthand this exciting move for her company. Very impressive businesswoman for sure. And I loved watching business being done on the floor!
  • Best shirts for the second year go to Salem Distributing. Whoever is making the clothing call there, keep it up--looks great. In close second is Lisec. The maroon/black look is strong. Speaking of Lisec, it was very nice to catch up with Hans Hoenig, Bob Quast and run into Chris Brooks as well. And you can’t mention fashion without mentioning Walker Glass, of course. In a few weeks I’ll share a story about me, fashion and the industry's most stylish man, Danik Dancause, that some of you will get a kick out of.
  • Best booth idea/promotion? Dressing up in zebra-printed sport jackets by the guys from Lite Sentry. Mark Abbott and Eric Hegstrom looked dapper, and it was a good way to get their message across. Also, I really liked what PRL did with their booth--super use of product. And the same can go for HMI Cardinal; they had some product on display that really blew people away.
  • Safety really matters, and so seeing Tuff-n-Lite having a packed booth the entire show was exciting for me. If I was still a fabricator, I’d surely be trying out their safety gear in my shop. There are some really neat advancements of safety technology there. Props to Mary Olivier of Tubelite for her golden touch on booth selection. She hit the jackpot with what seemed to be a perfect spot with traffic coming in from all ends.
  • Bloggers galore. Bill Evans did a tremendous job with his Express Learning spot and Bill Briese of GED was nice enough to step out of his booth for a moment to catch up with me. Love when either of the guys write. And yes, it was great to see my brother Steve. Healthy, happy and strong, and doing amazing things with Bobby Hartong (who refuses to come to GlassBuild for some reason; I think it's me) and their team at W.A. Wilson.
  • Not seen: Unfortunately Ralph Aknin had to cancel out last minute. You were missed for sure, Ralph. Also, because of the crowded show/meeting landscape, Jon Kimberlain of Dow Corning had to miss out. Since he doesn’t read this blog, someone tell him he was missed! I believe Joe Carlos from TriView was there, but I missed him, too. Plus, the show was not the same for me (or others I am sure) with Chris “Megatron” Dolan not in the Guardian booth. (Though the gang there did a great job of showing off their product and services as always.) 
  • There’s other news from this week including a good friend of this blog getting a new position and Viracon opening back up in Utah. Those and other stories I will hit next week as we get back to normal. Or whatever "normal" is in my life…

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 15, 2014

During the last 10 years, the architectural industry has transformed from a business of two-dimensional drawings and standard systems, to a 3D world with custom demands and consistently increasing performance expectations. This complexity in the design world has been matched by accelerating R&D from building product manufacturers, along with widening product offerings and system possibilities.

In no industry has this been truer than the glass business, where manufacturers have rapidly grown their glass and framing options to provide better performance and more aesthetic possibilities. An architect now has a million potential glass and glazing system combinations to choose from when specifying products, according to estimates from industry officials during the opening panel at the Glazing Executives Forum, held in conjunction with GlassBuild America last week in Las Vegas.

The proliferation of product options pushes the envelope of what is possible on the façade. However, it also opens the door to confusion, mis-specifications and frustrations. And, that can lead to glass-clad buildings that don’t meet energy-performance expectations, which harms the whole industry.

“In some areas of the world, we’ve lost the ‘Battle for the Wall,’” said GEF panelist Jay Phillips, commercial segment director, Americas, for Guardian Industries. In South America, for example, architects are looking to alternative materials for their building facades due to concerns that glass buildings won’t be able to perform, he said.

Educating the design industry about the best use of glass products on the building will be critical to combating misuse of glass products and misassumptions about performance potential, the panelists emphasized.

“We need to be thinking about educating the industry at large,” said Mic Patterson, director of strategic development for Enclos Corp., during the GEF panel. “We need to be collaborating as an industry. … We need to be figuring out how to do this better [in terms of performance], and taking it to the street. And we need to make sure that the technological improvements and enhancements are appropriately utilized.”

At every level in the glass industry—from manufacturers to fabricators to glaziers—companies need to make sure their architectural reps and project managers are familiar with the most up-to-date product options on the market. They need to be aware of the best ways to ensure performance and cost-effective product solutions. They need to assess the needs of each project individually and be able to communicate the best product options to the architectural team.

“It’s not a single product, or what the product can do. It’s the need—what is the design intent, and what are the design requirements,” said Glenn Miner director construction, flat glass at PPG Industries, during a recent interview. “I ask architects to tell me what they are looking for. I don’t want a [performance] number. Say ‘I wish I didn’t have morning glare, or I want the view in the afternoon, or I wish I had more control.’ We can find you glass solutions to fit your needs.”

Katy Devlin, Editor, Glass Magazine
 
The opinions expressed here and in reader comments are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 8, 2014

One of the most frequent questions I hear is: How can I get in the magazine? It’s this question that prompted the Smart PR Express Learning session that I will be leading this week during GlassBuild America in Las Vegas. (Check out the schedule here, if you’re at the show and would like to attend).

Being featured in the magazines or online is not only exciting, it’s also smart business. Your customers are likely reading Glass Magazine; features in print prove the quality of your work and the legitimacy of your company; and magazine profiles help foster work pride among your employees. All of this affects your bottom line.

The first step to getting in the magazine is to familiarize yourself with the content. Find out what types of features are in the magazine, and think about where your company’s products and services might be a good fit. Glass Magazine offers numerous opportunities for project profiles, trend studies, technical articles, product announcements and personnel news.

Next, make sure you know who the editors are and that you have their contact information. (My email is at the bottom of this blog for anyone who doesn’t yet have it). We want to hear from you. We like to hear from you. Send us emails, schedule interviews or booth visits at trade shows, or organize facility tours. If something is going on that we should know about, from a new hire to a cool project, let us know. We can’t cover it in the magazine or online if we don’t know about it.

And make sure the editors know you. It helps to have a dedicated marketing point person for your company who will reach out to us with any news, and who will be our go-to person if we are seeking information. You don’t need to have a person whose sole job is marketing. For many companies, even some large glass firms, I work directly with the president and owner. For others, I work with outside PR firms. Both can work work very well. 

Finally, consider authoring an article. Glass Magazine and its online publications feature industry-submitted blogs, columns and technical articles. You have an industry expertise that we don’t, and we appreciate your contributions.

Katy Devlin, Editor, Glass Magazine
 
The opinions expressed here and in reader comments are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

We’re now one week out from the biggest event in our industry. In this special GlassBuild America edition of the blog, I wanted to first touch on a few things I have not hit on previously.

The Glazing Executives Forum, backed once again this year by industry heavy hitters YKK AP, Guardian, SAPA, Pilkington, Dow Corning, and FMI, will be solid. The forum kicks off with a very strong panel featuring Mic Patterson of Enclos, Jay Phillips of Guardian, and Oliver Stepe of YKK; concludes with the industry's favorite economist Dr. Jeffrey Dietrich; and features timely, needed break-out sessions in the middle. It’s an extremely interesting agenda. Check it out.

Meanwhile, GlassBuild America will also be home to a very important session being hosted by the Department of Energy. Yes, the DOE will be on site with a forum led by Dr. Karma Sawyer. (I am a huge fan of her personally; check my archives.) Participants in this event will be able to provide feedback directly to the DOE Building Technologies Office on their needs over the next three to five years, and to provide input about the facilities that will be critical to moving their energy efficient products to widespread application in residential and commercial markets, in new construction, replacement and retrofit. More simply said, it’s an awesome opportunity to reach people in our world who can make a difference. While there are the typical opportunities to come to the show and do business, there are also these other events that make the overall show even more monumental.

Elsewhere…

  • I’m hearing that the folks from Vetrotech Saint-Gobain will have something really memorable in their booth this year. Go download the GlassBuild America App, and make a note of their location.
  • Speaking of the App, it really makes the show experience more complete. Three ways to get it: Search for GlassBuild 2014 in the iTune App store/Google Marketplace; click here and follow the links/codes; or, if you like to wait 'til the last minute, QR codes will be on signage everywhere during the show, and you can scan and load the app from there. If you are going to the show, you have to have this on your phone.
  • I’ve previously hit on all of the other cool things with GlassBuild America this year: the Express Learning FREE 20-minute sessions on the floor; the demonstrations; the innovation (some amazing products that should not be missed); and just being with thousands of people covering every bit of our industry.
  • You may wonder about my passion for the show. While I do work for this show, I'm also an industry guy and believe that a strong industry benefits from the success of a major event like this. The education, the business possibilities and the innovation on display are crucial for this industry to evolve, grow and be healthy. Yes, I am a full-throated promoter of the show, but one with serious beliefs in the incredible value it brings.
  • As always, I will be working the floor, shooting video, interviewing people and networking. I’ll be wearing my bright yellow media vest; please stop me and say hi.
  • I won’t have a formal blog next week since we’ll be in the middle of show coverage, but the week after I’ll be back here with my traditional "Who’s Who" of the show. For those new readers, that’s where I call out people I got to meet, see and chat with. This blog will also look at the best products and exhibits at the show.

See you at the show!

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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