Monday, October 17, 2016

In the past four weeks, I have witnessed a grand display of future-focused aspiration and innovation in the glass industry. This began at glasstec last month and will continue this week at GlassBuild America in Las Vegas, and it was the central tenant of last week’s 2016 Facade Tectonics World Congress.

The two-day façades conference, organized by the Facade Tectonics Institute, brought together academics, architects, engineers, manufacturers, façade contractors and more for high-level research based discussions on the future of the façade industry. The message of the conference was clear—the construction and design industry is witnessing a remarkable and fast evolution toward buildings that perform better, are made with more sustainable materials, and are healthier and more comfortable for occupants.

“What drives me is the recognition of the role the façade has in addressing the issues that affect our planet—climate change, sustainability,” says Mic Patterson, current president of FTI and director of strategic business development for Schüco USA.

“We are committed to the advocacy for high performance facades,” says Helen Sanders, incoming president of the FTI and vice president of technical business development for SageGlass. High-performance buildings of tomorrow will not only need to lessen the impact on the environment, but will also need to be healthier for occupants, she says. “By 2020, according to the World Health Organization, the top two health issues will be heart disease and mental health. Our challenge is to create a building that is healthy for people. The building envelope is part of that,” Sanders says.

These future buildings, and their façades, will be more complex; they will feature new materials; and they will push the envelope of what existing materials, like glass, can do. Meeting the demands of these projects requires collaboration among all players, from the architects to the glazing contractors. It relies on continued advancements of materials and changes in how those materials integrate with the building as a whole. This future building industry will present great opportunities to companies up and down the chain, if they get on board.

“The changes of the recent past are accelerating. We are seeing a fundamental change in material systems and how we use them,” says Bill Kreysler, president of panel fabricator, Kreysler & Associates Inc. “This is a time of change. The most dangerous thing you can do is not.”

“The drivers in our field are owners, manufacturers, architects, engineers, glazing contractors,” says Chris Stutzki, founder and owner of Stutzki Engineering. “It starts with the owner to push change to the architect and engineer. They have to push the manufacturers to make new products. They push the glazing contractors to learn how to install.”

Large-scale changes to the industry will be slow in coming. However, many smaller changes have already begun. Better-performing products, next-generation glasses, and more efficient equipment were discussed during the FTI conference and are on display at glasstec and GlassBuild America. These changes are all key to the greater evolution in building better buildings.

The time is now to get informed and get involved. In the words of Steve Selkowitz, senior advisor for building science at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: “think big, start small, act now.” 

Katy Devlin is editor of Glass Magazine. Contact her at 

Monday, October 17, 2016

Since a major majority of the industry will be there in one form or fashion, I am dedicating this entire post to GlassBuild America. Obviously I am heavily involved with the show. Those of you who go, know I’m running around the floor, camera in hand, wearing a bright yellow vest looking like I just left an earlier post of parking cars or landing planes. So, first and foremost, if you are a reader of this blog, please feel free to stop me to say hi. I’d love to meet you!

As for the show itself, this year is lining up to be off-the-charts on several levels. Do yourself a favor and download the GlassBuild Amercia app to guide you through the event. That and all of the things I will cover below can be found by clicking here. 

  • Major first key of this show for me? There will be more than 400 exhibitors from all over the world. If you are not looking to improve yourself or your business by adding or upgrading products and services, you’re missing out. As I have been planning my route around the show I am blown away at the amount of diverse options on display. 
  • Next is the education. Between the forums and the incredible Express Learning, there is plenty to get your arms around. On the Express Learning side, the schedule was slimmed down a bit so attendees can have time to walk the floor and network and still make sure they are catching plenty of free educational sessions. One session that I find fascinating is the “Cyber Security on the Plant Floor." We are in a new world and with all the automation I keep harping on here comes the opportunity for bad guys to disrupt. This will be neat to hear about. 
  • Wait until you see the new! It will revolutionize training as we know it and the re-launch of this program makes its debut at the show. I was lucky enough to see a sneak preview and this program is absolutely off-the-charts awesome. The program features some seriously important collaboration with heavy hitters out there too, so the training you get will have a longer range effect than you may realize. Sorry for being cryptic overall. I don’t want to blow the surprise of the launch. The official kick off is at Noon on Thursday, Oct. 20. If you care at all about training and growth (and you should), you will want to be at Booth #314 for this and learn more about it throughout the event.
  • Networking. This is my favorite aspect of the show and one that is truly the key of the event. Pre-registration was up 27 percent over last year as of two weeks ago. So between that and so many exhibitors on the floor, there will be no lack of opportunity to meet with people, renew and expand relationships and grow your personal and company brand. Even those companies that DON’T exhibit are still sending multiple people to the show to work/walk it. Why? Because they hit the floor and they network as they know so many in the industry ARE THERE. And while they may miss out on the potential business gain by having an exhibit, they are still making sure they are involved. So at the end of the day, everyone that has an impact on the industry, or wants to have an impact on the industry, is there… in one way or another. AND THAT'S what makes this show so important and so good.

So there you go, my passion pitch and preview of the week ahead. It really should be a great one. Next week I’ll recap it with my standard of best exhibits seen, those folks who I was fortunate enough to run into, those I missed and much, much more. I hope to see you there!

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 10, 2016

These days the bridging of art and technology for architectural glass applications is present in many forms. What is art without technology? What is technology without art? What will the long-term existence of each be on its own? How will the existence of both be perceived in the future?

As technology quickly advances, more and more applications for creating imagery and color on monolithic glass for architectural use are emerging. If properly designed and engineered, a dynamic, successful project is completely possible. Technology's focus is on process. 

In the world of architectural art glass, artists focus on not only traditional methods of design and fabrication, but they are also embracing the merging of new technology with traditional methods. Many glass artists are trained in myriad artistic glass processes that yield a diverse cache of aesthetic results. Artist’s input in the early stages of design can make all the difference in any size space. It is not at all uncommon for artists to work outside the studio at other facilities that can provide the space and equipment needed to create large format work, often combining artistic processes. The artist’s application is also solution based, but the glass artwork is what connects the mind and spirit to the place or space. 

Just because technology is available, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the best solution or the best way to do something. There will always be trade offs; physiological, cost, longevity, etc. Rather than going with a straightforward technical interpretation for a project application, collaborating with a carefully selected glass artist can result in imagery that has depth, dimension and greater meaning to the customer. An artist trained and knowledgeable in a wide range of artistic glass design, processes and technology can contribute greatly to a project by being part of the collaborative team, or by putting the best team together. Beyond function, technology is diminished without art. Without technology, art may not reach its greatest potential.

Nancy Gong is owner and director of Gong Glass Works, an art studio that focuses on the design and fabrication of contemporary architectural art glass. Gong serves on the Board for the American Glass Guild, is AGG’s 2017 Conference and Program Chair, is a member of the Glass Art Society and Stained Glass Association of America, and an Allied Member of the American Institute of Architects Rochester. She can be reached at

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 10, 2016

When it comes to automation, glass fabricators have truly taken advantage of the innovations. Years ago those companies who put in an automated IG line had some sort of halo effect--they were above and beyond. Now it’s commonplace. And the next steps of automation continue with advanced robotics. Especially with many of the exhibits I saw at glasstec and figure to see at GlassBuild America--more and more fabrication plants are becoming more reliant on the robotic/automated side of things. But what about the glazier? Is installing framing and glass robot-proof? I have to think it is. Obviously I am talking about field fab and install and not unitized. So does that mean that unitizing is going to keep along the growth path and become a majority of the style of material installed? I am curious on what the glazing community thinks on that and will be one of the questions I’ll be asking when I see everyone next week in Las Vegas. If you want to chime in ahead of time on automation, unitized and the glazier, please drop me a line.


  • My friend Gary Tongco of FreMarq Innovations sent me this excellent article on the continued growth of green and sustainable projects. Many companies like Gary’s truly get it with the focus on advanced performance, and I think the days of having only “everyday” sorts of products are waning. 
  • The Vitro acquisition of PPG became official last week. I’m interested to monitor the next steps for new Vitro Architectural Glass. Obviously Vitro announcing a jumbo coater is surely a signal of some serious desire to grow the space.
  • I did have to laugh when I saw the Pittsburgh Penguins arena is changing its name from Consol Energy Center to PPG Paints Arena. PPG PAINTS. I guess they had to make sure the word PAINTS got in there in case one of us lowly glass people got confused, eh? Funny thing is, reading many of the message boards, many in the real world have no idea PPG is not in the glass space anymore. So they were commenting like crazy on why the word “paints” was so dominant. Example comment: “What about the glass… doesn’t PPG stand for “Pittsburgh Plate Glass?” I guess the commenters are not reading my blog, eh?
  • Glass Magazine is the official media partner of this week’s Façade Tectonics World Congress. The agenda looks outstanding and the show is promoting itself as one that goes deep into the info and not just a place for the “starchitect.”  Unfortunately I won’t be there in person but knowing between Glass Magazine’s twitter feed and that of John Wheaton (who I saw on twitter is attending), I am positive I will at least get as much flavor as possible. Events like this one can serve a great purpose in our industry for providing significant high level insight that is needed for us to keep pushing the envelope further.
  • Last this week, a Happy Thanksgiving to my friends in the awesome country of Canada. Hope everyone enjoys with their family and friends and can give thanks to all we are so fortunate to have!


Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 3, 2016

The last quarter of the year is now upon us as time simply keeps on flying. For some it’s been a tremendous year to date and the obvious desire stands to finish it out strong. For some the fourth quarter is a chance to make up on some lost ground and make 2016 better than what it was looking like a few months ago. The good news for both parties is current confidence in our markets remains high. The only potential bad news is in some areas the release of work from backlog to actual order continues to be delayed resulting in some uneven expectations. In the end, this quarter will end an era: the last of the current administration in power in the United States. Q1 of 2017 will start a new time and we’ll see how that goes.


  • But in thinking about next year, the news from an economic forecasting standpoint is positive. Though this week we did get mixed results, the overall looks promising. You just always have to take some of these indexes with a grain of salt because so much can change, quickly. The positive is absolutely the nonresidential building starts. The August results were the second highest month since early 2008. Starts at that level right now surely will be a good thing for our industry and when we get to work in 2017.
  • On the flip side, the Architectural Billings Index did trend down last month, only the second time in 2016. None of the analysts seem worried about the negative result, and I am not either at this point as all of the metrics are still healthy. But we’ll continue to watch to see if there are any cracks in the foundation.
  • One of the biggest parts of GlassBuild America this year is the re-launch of the The need for education and training in our industry is massive and this program is going to be an incredible resource for that. The new MyGlassClass features an updated roster of comprehensive, interactive online courses specifically designed to meet the training needs of contract glaziers, full-service glass companies and glass fabricators. Believe me, you will love it. When you are at the show, there will be ample opportunity for you to check it out for yourself. Please make some time to do so. GlassBuild America is October 19-21 in Las Vegas. The buzz ahead of this event is off the charts.
  • MUST READ article of the week. Folks this one is amazing and will get your blood boiling a little bit for sure, especially when it comes to the tremendous waste of money that goes into running a political campaign. It is an inside look at the political consultant and basically the huge amounts of cash squandered with no ROI measurements or angle of actual proof of performance ever in sight. Seriously one of the best pieces I have read this year. 
  • Last this week, and with so many of us headed to Vegas in a few weeks, I present to you the release of the Nevada casino August winnings. Take a look at the last one. For the casinos those pennies are obviously adding up!

Blackjack $81.19 million
Craps $26.47 million
Roulette $25.42 million   
Baccarat $73.65 million   
Sports $1.93 million
Penny slots $257.04 million

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 3, 2016

A number of times this year on glassblog, I have discussed the generational aspect of the glass industry. And as generation after generation comes on board, glass industry businesses are tasked with successfully passing the baton and transitioning the company to a new generation of owners. 

Glass Magazine's Exit Planning & Succession series covered the financial and business details of many types of business exits (see the features in the Jan/Feb, April, May, June, July and August issues), along with company profiles from industry companies with exit and succession experience. While we have concluded our series in the magazine, stories on navigating the exit and succession process from all types of industry companies continue to come in. I recently spoke with two glass business owners out of Florida who are preparing to transition management to the next generation. 

The first was Shower Doors & More co-owner Page Giacin, who runs the first generation shower door fabrication company with her husband Larry in south Florida. When they first started the company, Page answered phones and took orders while their son Tyler played in a corral made of shower doors. Now he is pursuing a degree in business and working at Shower Doors & More on school breaks. The Giacins plan to pass the business along to Tyler within five years.

"Tyler knows how to do grunt work, whatever needs to be done. We want him to get experience and then apply it at the business," says Giacin. "We have always had a very grassroots process with him because to run this business you have to know how to do it all. [A transition] has to be a longer process in a family business, and he has to earn it. He'll take care of it better."

The next business owner I spoke with runs a family-owned contract glazing company in Florida. "[The company] was started in 1992 out of our house," said the owner, who wishes to remain anonymous. "It was us in a truck doing whatever we could to eat. We had no savings, a house and car payment and two adolescent children that we had no idea how we were going to get through college. We took on any job with a commercial focus and even did board ups in the middle of the night. When we started no one would give us a job over $3,000. We now employ 40 people and are embarking on an expansion."

The company owner began training their young son 10 years ago, when they helped him open his own business. "Together, we started a hurricane protection company in 2004," the owner said. "He learned to bid, sell and install. He continued to run [the business] until 2009 when we gave him 5 percent of [the glazing firm] with the plan for him to learn our business from top to bottom. We wanted to be sure it was something our son loved to do and wanted to take on as an owner in the future."

The son is poised to take over the company within five to ten years.  

Bethany Stough is managing editor of Glass Magazine. If you have an exit or succession planning story to share, write her at 

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

From eye-catching, previously unimaginable glass applications, to never-before-seen automated machine solutions, glasstec 2016 exhibitors demonstrated what is now possible in the glass industry. See the innovations that were on display.



glasstec 2016 Part 1

Featuring photos from A+W, AGC, Bohle, Bystronic, Cricursa, Trosifol, Dow Corning and EuroGlas.

glasstec 2016 Part 2

Featuring photos from Fenzi, Forel, GIMAV, Guardian Industries, Intermac, Langendorf and HEGLA.

glasstec 2016 Part 3

Featuring photos from Lisec, OmniDecor, NSG Pilkington, Quattrolifts, Sedak, Sevasa and Vetrotech Saint-Gobain.


Katy Devlin is editor of Glass Magazine. Contact her at 

Monday, September 26, 2016

The 2016 glasstec show is now in the books. It was an incredible experience and it did surpass 2014 on many levels. So here's my take on the products, equipment, people and scene from Germany. 

On the side of glass and glazing products, the push at decorative and colors is still a driver. There was a ton on the floor. I was also impressed by the anti-reflective options. That material is getting so clear, it's really invisible. There were a handful of energy-related products. I really liked a product called Light Glass that could switch from clear, to opaque, and then even to a light that could illuminate the room. I also was really impressed by Glaze Alarm. This was a product I saw two years ago here and it advanced nicely. It has the potential to change the market when it comes to security systems for residential and commercial applications. Plus its inventor, George Schaar, is easily one of the nicest fellows I've ever met. 

Equipment-wise, this show always gets you going. I love the automation advancements, and the overall improvements that the manufacturers keep making on their machines. My favorite was one I would've missed but thankfully Nick Sciola of Hartung told me to check it out. It was the Grezenbach guided vehicles for moving packaged glass. These were automated vehicles and forklifts, and they were mesmerizing to me. It's just a matter of time before seeing these in plants in North America, especially for job shop fabricators.

Exhibit-wise, the marketing folks from around the world had bigger budgets to play with and really used some healthy creativity, too. I liked Glaston doing a remote tempering session. A crowd of folks at the Glaston booth could watch a big screen of tempering in Finland. Evidently others have done this, but this was a first for me. Other stands featured all sorts of efforts to get an audience, including a contemporary dancer, painted woman, back to the future theme, music and more.  The best overall booth, and the one most people talked about, was Guardian's. They had a concrete and glass structure that stood out. I was in awe. The structure showed the products they wanted to promote perfectly.

On the people side, I missed many that were coming, folks like the great guys from Glassopolis, Jordan Richards and Rob Botman. I also was bummed to miss Dick and Mike Macurak from DM Products. And I only got a second with Devin Bowman of TGP. He is so popular, though, that's probably the amount of time he scheduled for me. I did get to visit with many great folks, though. Loved seeing Donald Press and Peter Stattler of Okalux North America. Also great to spend quality time with Kris Vockler, Chris Fronsoe and Abram Scurlock of ICD Coatings. The last time I saw Deron Patterson from PPG was glasstec 2014 so it was good to visit. Running into Bill O'Keefe and Tim Nass of Safti First was very cool. You know I love everyone from Canada, so to run into the various company contingents from that great country was tremendous for me. Always fun to get to chat with Thomas Martini of Vitrum. He keeps me on my toes. Was also nice to meet his guys Adam Byrne and Tyler Boult. Good young talent there. Seeing Peter Garvey and Tim Richard and the team from SAAND was enjoyable. Though I talked their ears off for sure. Old friend Matt Hale was making his glasstec debut and he and Eric Channel of Global Glass Solutions were out of business cards by mid day 1. Not a surprise with how friendly those two are. And speaking of friendly, I am always grateful for the friendship of Max Hals and Ian Patlin of Paragon. Great guys who do super work and are as smart and hard working as they come. Last on this section Bernard and Linda Lax of Pulp Studio were great as always. Congrats to them on the new facility and all the good they have going on.

So aside from four solid days of seeing so much glass and glazing materials there was one really notable event that I was honored and quite frankly humbled to attend. The Guardian Gala. This event was off the charts with regards to food, entertainment, networking, you name it. I'm just a consultant hustling to make a living and to be amongst the best glass people in the WORLD is incredible to me. It was great to chat with so many people there, but it's always 
great to catch up with Chris Dolan. But I can't call him "Megatron" any more since that name retired from football. So I'll work on an updated moniker there. And I must mention it was really special to see Amy Hennes be mentioned by the president of Guardian's glass division at the gala. Those of us who work with Amy (putting my media hat on) know she really rocks at what she does. With how busy she is at these shows, I was thrilled to get a few minutes with her. 

All in all this really is a glass geek's dream event. Just so much to see and experience. And it gets me even more pumped for GlassBuild America. Yes, it's not the same, but the ability to meet up with people, see new products and learn are there and I never take any of those areas from granted. Plus it's a lot closer than Germany!!!

No links or videos this week. Writing and posting from my hotel in Dusseldorf, and I am afraid if I post a video it could crash the internet here. Next week I'll have reactions to the first slip in ABI in a while and more...

Click to read more From the Fabricator...

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

I made a big mistake last week, and broke a rule I’d been told many times before: Never test drive a car you can’t afford (or don’t have room in your garage for). You see, I made the mistake of walking past a Tesla showroom with time to spare. Before long, I was on a test drive of the new Model S, all electric sedan, around the streets of Seattle.  

After a brief 45-minute drive, I’d like to suggest the following. First, keep your old internal combustion car (better yet, with a manual clutch) for yourself or the scrapyard – your kids or grandkids will have no need or interest in it. Second, you WILL be driving an electric car in the next 10 years.  

The Model S totally changed both my past perceptions and preconceived notions all in the short span of 45 minutes. Finally, traditional automotive manufacturers have some serious catching up to do… quickly. 

This experience got me thinking about our own industry, and the opportunities we see (or don’t) that are ripe for innovation. Like my experience with the Model S, advances in glass technology are demolishing expectations around what is possible when it comes to building design and performance.

Let me explain. Architects specify glass to help make buildings more comfortable, with access to abundant natural light and views – whether it’s a view of a mountain or a cityscape. Nothing unusual about that. But as building codes and owner expectations have evolved, glass is now being called upon to do much more.

For example, ask a person on the street if window glass can stand up to a hurricane, and you’re likely to get a resounding “no!” since they’ve seen TV news images of windows blowing out during big storms. But, true to our industry’s spirit of innovation that I blogged about last month, manufacturers offer a range of glazing that can meet the nation’s most stringent hurricane codes – those of Miami-Dade County, Florida. Such products have been around for several years, but what about glass that is both hurricane-safe and fire-rated? Architects have been asking for that multi-performance, which is now coming to market.

Likewise, as communities demand that schools better defend against mass shootings, glass is playing a role. A parent might think that a concrete wall is needed to protect their children at school, but again, glass demolishes expectations. Architects are specifying high-performance glass in schools to make a more light-filled and conducive learning environment, while also resisting bullets and providing staff and police necessary visibility in and out of the building during emergencies.

For everyone in the glass business, good job at demolishing expectations around what is possible with glass – keep up the great work.

Jeff Razwick is the president of Technical Glass Products, a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. He writes frequently about the design and specification of glazing for institutional and commercial buildings, and is a past chair of the Glass Association of North America’s Fire-Rated Glazing Council. He can be reached at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 19, 2016

This week I will be in Germany for the bi-annual glasstec show. This event attracts people from around the world and my true hope is to see some new things, especially on the product side. On my last trip there, the equipment on display was dominant and impressive, but the actual product technology left me a little cold. We’ll see, and I look forward to reporting back here on what I find and what may make an impact on our world going forward. Also, this is a nice chance for me to get familiar with many exhibitors who will also be at GlassBuild America. I counted around 100 glasstec exhibitors who’ll also be in Las Vegas in October. So that will be a neat sneak preview for sure. Last, I always look forward to and get a kick out of the fact that I’ll run into people from North America there that I won’t see ever over here. Depending on wi-fi connections, I am going to try and tweet, so feel free to follow along on Twitter: @maxpsolesource 


  • The good news via the monthly forecasts keeps coming. The latest Dodge Momentum Index was up again for the fifth straight month. We’re still far from where we were during the crazy pre-recession times, but we’re also now getting far away from the depths of the recession itself. Obviously we all look towards November and we’ll see what happens then and the effect it may or may not have on the economy.
  • I was very happy to see my friend Scott Hoover and Solaria back in the news again in a collaboration with the NSG Group. I love innovation and technology and the more steam fresh products can get the better.
  • Time for the monthly review of Glass Magazine. And this is an issue that you will want to devour. A few pieces of note. Katy Devlin went inside with a piece on the PPG-Vitro deal. Story was great, but I also must say the appearance and layout of it was even better. Really loved how it looked! Also really liked the piece from Gary McQueen of JE Berkowitz on design assist. Well done.
  • But the real focus of the issue was GlassBuild America and what to expect and who and what to see. It was really an excellent primer to get you ready for the show. So if you are going, you really want to read through this. And if you are not going, it surely gives you a great taste of what you are missing. 
  • Ad of the month? Because this issue was gigantic, I could not just pick one ad winner. A lot of companies raised their creative game this month, so I have three who get this extremely valuable honor of being named my ad of the month.

Guardian is back in the winner circle again. Loved their ad featuring a sketch drawing and calling out where the glass goes. Just caught my eye and was 

Schuco is also a winner this month. They showed an old typewriter and headlined “Don’t become a thing of the past.” BRILLIANT. Congrats to them on a great 

Lisec takes the last spot with their “Velocity” ad. They wanted to promote speed and the ad caught my eye and did that. It was a simple, clean piece that 
was effective.

All in all though, tons of good creative this month. Congrats to all out there working that angle!

  • Last this week, US News and World Report released its top colleges list this week and it’s always interesting to see what’s considered the best here and there. But I had to laugh that they listed the top “value” colleges and #1 was Harvard… and the “value” price was just… 62K per year. I guess value has a different meaning in the college world. 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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