glassblog

Monday, November 17, 2014

A few months back, I came across a list of seven architectural blunders that covered design missteps from the “worrying to the downright absurd.” Shortly after, I saw an infographic titled “Failure by Design.” Reading two pieces that highlighted wayward designs so close together got me thinking: Shouldn’t we focus on learning from past mistakes and designing better buildings, instead of fixating on the errors themselves?

From a glass and framing perspective, experience has taught me the answer is yes. History has helped inform and instruct us to better use glass in building design, from the type of products the industry now offers to how we install them.

Consider how much we’ve learned from increasing the amount of glazing in the building envelope. Buildings with poor thermal performance led to low-emissivity glass, which evolved into spectrally selective low-E glass. Now, hyper-insulating, electrochromic and thermochromic glazing options are entering the field to further improve the energy-efficiency of buildings. Design professionals using these advanced products can better optimize curtain walls and façades.

Glass-enclosed buildings have also brought entirely new problems to light, such as how to prevent bird strikes and effectively communicate user control for operable windows. Without buildings that called into question these limitations, designs would not be able account for performance or occupant comfort in the way they do today.

On the code side, consider the progression of fire-rated glazing products. To meet supporting design goals, it’s become increasingly common to see the hardworking material supplement daylighting, match non-fire-rated glazing systems, provide building compartmentation and act as a focal point—all in one application. As a result of the products’ multifunctionality, the glazing industry has been able to make architects’ and general contractors’ jobs easier.

For each of the advancements above, one or two buildings served as a catalyst for change. While it’s easy to dissect the criticism they’ve received, what’s more important is that all building and design sectors, including glass and framing, have greatly benefited from the chance to evaluate what we can do better.

So, as 2015 fast approaches, let’s use history to move us closer to better glass and framing solutions. Time and experience are excellent teachers. They generate a natural increase in sophistication in buildings over time that ultimately shape the future of glazing. What have they taught you about glass and framing?

Jeff Razwick is the president of Technical Glass Products (TGP), a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. He writes frequently about the design and specification of glazing for institutional and commercial buildings, and (past) chairs the Glass Association of North America’s (GANA) Fire-Rated Glazing Council (FRGC). Contact him at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, November 17, 2014

The acquisition part of the glass industry has been pretty quiet in the last few years. While some smaller deals have taken place, the mega deals have not. But I can tell you that if the hot rumors blowing up my phone and e-mail are true, there is one such mega deal coming soon. If this deal happens, it will change the landscape of the industry again. Back in my past life I could throw the names out there (like I did when I broke the EFCO-Pella and Oldcastle-Vistawall deals), but things are different these days. People are more careful (me included), and companies like to float things to throw me off the scent (yes, I have been told as much). So, I’ll just leave it at the teaser above. In any case, I’m grabbing the popcorn and sitting back waiting to see if/when this one happens. It should be very interesting.

Elsewhere…

  • Guardian announced the closing of its Floreffe, Pennsylvania plant, which will be the third domestic float plant to go off line in the last year now. Add that to the many (nine at least) gone since 2006. In some circles word is this whole tightening of glass supply may be made up. All I am saying is it's now down to pure math and logic. We are facing A LOT less capacity matched to better and improving business conditions. As a consumer of glass, you have two choices: look for a conspiracy and start arguments, or plan to be proactive and be on top of your game with active communications and prepared logistics. Your choice, but math and logic are on my side on this one. And if the tightening does not turn out to be serious, guess what? Your business actually got better because you had to become even more efficient than before. No downside at all to that.
  • There is one other major potential tightening of supply in the world right now that could be a concern. A potential shortage of chocolate. Even a product like this suffers from many supply chain issues, too. Glad I am back on the diet again because when I get off, M&M’s may be $10 per bag.
  • I have to ask my readers in California for some insight into what I am hearing is a massive mess with Title 24. Evidently, municipalities are developing their own codes, which are confusing and beyond the current written code in place. This “wild wild west” mentality is throwing the various code inspectors into a bit of a flux and thus delaying code decisions and actual occupancy of buildings. I’d love some input on what is happening there and if it’s as crazy as it sounds. Or is it just the good ole California way of doing business? At the end of the day though, it’s already tough enough to do business when you are dealing with codes and ratings as it is, but a moving goal post is surely not fun.
  • Speaking of energy, this time in Washington, D.C., it will be interesting to see if the change in the make up of the Senate will help the Shaheen-Portman energy efficiency bill get off the ground. There are some positives in that bill that would be good for our industry for sure.
  • Coming soon will be my list of potential Industry MVPs. Last year’s winner was Tracy Rogers of Quanex. Who will take home the prize in 2014?

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Last year, I made the mistake of asking my seven-year-old nephew to think about the tall buildings in a big city as a visual for architectural glass (so he could understand what “my” magazine is about). As a lifetime resident of northern Virginia, his nearest big city is Washington, D.C.

“You mean like the Washington Monument?” he said.
“Well, no, like a skyscraper with lots of windows.”
“What’s a skyscraper?”

When thinking of the nation’s capital, he pictured brick buildings and stone monuments. But the idea of heavy glass use was difficult to imagine in his big city experience.

I was reminded of this conversation when visiting my sister again recently. We planned an afternoon in the city, and because I am unwittingly becoming a “glass geek” I asked if we could visit the newly opened and glass-centric American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial.
The memorial honors disabled veterans and their families, in part using three walls of oversize glass panels showcasing etched images and quotes. At five layers thick, these laminated panels are an impressive feat of glass fabrication.

As my nephew noted the layers of glass in each panel—and that they had been “glued” together to make thicker panels—I told him that this is the type of glass Glass Magazine is all about.

“Cool,” he said, continuing to look at the pictures and run his fingers along the etched indentations in the glass.

And it is cool. Simply what can be done with glass, how it can enclose, showcase, wayfind and communicate, depending on how it’s applied, is cool. And it’s really cool when glass is the material of choice to honor our service men and women. I’d say it was a great choice. My nephew approved, too.

Read more about the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

The first major 2015 forecast was released last week and it was chock full of positive news. According to the Dodge Data & Analytics report, commercial building will be up 15 percent next year. In addition, the forecast predicted some nice gains for the institutional and public works segments. The public works business has been stuck in a bad place for a while, so gains there are not only good for our industry, but for overall life as well. The only hesitations now are pretty simple: Will this report be accurate? (as we all know these projections in the past haven’t exactly been picture perfect.) And, if it is correct, will there be glass available, and drivers available to deliver said glass, to meet these additional needs?

Elsewhere…

  • Despite the optimism above, there were mixed messages from the various monthly reports. The ABI was strong and has bounced back from a soft middle of the year, but the Dodge Momentum Index has not been stellar recently. However, it is in the positive territory, just not as solid as it was earlier in the year. Spending on nonresidential construction also dipped, which could be a red flag as well. 
  • A few of you out there may have heard me tell the story on how I desperately wanted to be selected for jury duty a few years ago and was passed over, making me the only person at the courthouse that day mad at being sent home at 11 a.m.  Well there’s a jury trial coming up that's so massive, so major, and quite frankly so unreal, that even I want anything to do with it right now. Although I actually find the subject to be fascinating because it involves our industry in a way. What I am talking about is the breach of contract trial regarding the Harmon Hotel at CityCenter in Las Vegas. The trial is expected to last a whole year, with more than three million pieces of evidence and 35 lawyers. The trial actually involves 12 separate cases wrapped into one. Now if I were retired, I would LOVE to be on this jury. Heck I have felt for years now that an oral history/book on the CityCenter project would be riveting, so doing this trial would be the icing on the cake. But it's not meant to be, and given the numbers of the folks brought in, my odds would’ve been long anyway. Over four hundred prospective jurors from an initial pool of 6000 will be whittled to 8 jurors and 12 alternates when all is said and done. This surely will be one to watch.
  • I was delayed in giving my Glass Magazine “best ad of the month” award. So in the awesome October issue, some previous winners continue to stand out (Kawneer, Cardinal, Quanex), but the nod this time goes to PPG for not only their clean and catchy back cover ad, BUT the companion specialty website to go with it. PPG has been very active creating specialty websites for specific products and promotions, and they did one as well with this ad. It’s a sharp and forward thinking maneuver. Well done and major props to Pat Kenny, Rob Struble and everyone there who had a hand in this.
  • Last this week, big time congratulations to my friend Jim Ventre on his promotion at Gardner Glass Products. Jim is now vice president of Flat Glass Sales at Gardner and that basically means he’s now big time… That also means he’ll probably never talk with me again! Seriously though, Jim is one of the industry's nicest guys, and it’s great to see him rewarded for his talent/efforts.

Read on for video and links of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, November 3, 2014

From specialty glass to machinery, and modern design options to thermal performance solutions, the products on display at glasstec 2014 demonstrated some of the “best of” for the glass industry. Exhibitors from around the world presented new innovations and solutions for customers, and demonstrated the increasing possibilities for glass. 

The world's largest trade show, glasstec, took place October 21-24 in Düsseldorf, Germany, where new glass technologies of every type and configuration, along with the machinery that creates them, took up nine exhibit halls. About 43,000 people attended the event, which hosted 1,217 exhibitors from around the world, according to show organizers.

Check out some of the industry's best in our glasstec 2014 photo galleries, below, and read more about the event here.

glasstec 2014, Day One

  

glasstec 2014, Day Two

   

glasstec 2014, Day Three

 

glasstec 2014, Day Four

   

 

glass technology live

   

Read more about the
products and services
on display at glasstec 2014

Monday, November 3, 2014

With glasstec done, we are now in the final stretch of 2014. The next eight weeks will set the tone for 2015 because of the various economic and industry conditions that are in play. The most major, and the one you will certainly hear the most about, is the primary glass supply concern. Certain styles of glass are already harder to get than they have been in recent times, and that issue is going to get worse. Add in the transportation issue that I touched on last week, and we’ve got a challenging road ahead. It is somewhat depressing that we find ourselves in this ordeal. We’ve waited for a more normalized run of business and now that it is here (in most places), we have to deal with these other obstacles. Enjoy the end of the year, celebrate the holidays, but get ready (and prepare to be more organized than ever), because 2015 is shaping up to be a very interesting year.

Elsewhere…

  • Because I was away, I missed the passing of Phil Blizzard, most recently of YKK AP. I was so saddened to hear the news. Phil was a great man and truly a unique character in our world. My condolences to his family and his friends and co-workers at YKK. He will be missed.
  • News this past week that the USGBC will delay the closing of the older LEED rating system (LEED 2009) until 2016 is no surprise at all. The new LEED version is starkly different, and once again the USGBC had no idea how long jobs take from the initial stages until product arriving on site. It was obvious that the new LEED version could not be the only program offered, and they had to make a move. Plus, this gives me time to try and understand the new version better; that will be a challenge for sure.
  • Speaking of green, I heard some so-so reviews on Greenbuild. Many felt that attendance was off and the lack of true decision makers was noticable. To me, there have never been many decision makers there, so that is not a surprise. Next year the show is in Washington, D.C., so I am sure everyone involved is hoping to get the attendance boost that a show in a heavily populated area like D.C. brings. Whether it brings actual decision makers, I still have my doubts.
  • One leftover from glasstec, I was very impressed by the products that Dow Corning had on display. Some serious out-of-the-box thinking happening there. Obviously Jon Kimberlain must have a hand in all of that greatness.
  • Also, the experience of flying Delta, and of flying through the Atlanta airport could not have been any smoother. The Atlanta airport blew me away from the moment we landed at the international terminal. The layout, instructions and helpful people were spectacular. Obviously much different than flying through Atlanta domestically where it is so crazy.
  • Once again following the Conners Sales Group on twitter (@ConnersSales) paid off with a link to an interesting story on mock-ups for glass. It was a well-done piece by Vivian Volz, and her blog looks like one to add to the reading list, especially when she’s writing about building products.
  • Am I dreaming, or did it really snow in several parts of the country this past weekend? Winter is predicted to be a bear, and I guess its getting a jump on things.
  • Last this week, thanks to the LinkedIn notifications I get, a happy birthday to three great industry guys...Have a good one Ryan Kerch of Quanex, James Wright of Glass Coatings and Concepts, and Kelly Townsend of Tubelite. Normally I don’t note all birthdays, but figured it would be nice to give a shout out to these excellent folks. Plus, for some reason I like November birthdays!

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The 2014 edition of glasstec is in the books and quite simply, it was amazing. Having never been to this event I did not know what to expect, and despite studying like crazy I was still caught off guard by the pure size of everything. Mostly every booth (or stand as they call them at this show) was monstrous.  The equipment on display was breathtaking, and as a glass geek, I just was in awe at so much of it. If there was a disappointment (other than horrendous Internet at my hotel), it was the weakness in glass technology. I did not see the innovation that I expected, and honestly I think we had more innovation with glass products at GlassBuild. But that was minor, because the equipment, the software, and the ability to see how people do things from all over the world was more than enough to make this an incredibly memorable week.

Overall, the show was packed, and people were very positive about the future. The only scary part was the scuttlebutt about tightening glass supply in North America, and the very obvious and frustrating lack of trucking that is causing delivery delays. The themes of 2015 will be logistics and planning, because our industry is not the same as it was five years ago. We have fewer float plants, fewer available trucks and drivers, and now major improving economic conditions. If you are a fabricator, you need to plan and inventory differently than you have in the past, and if you are a glazier, make sure you and your fabricator are communicating lead times effectively, because they may be disrupted due to transport issues. I will have much more on this in the coming weeks.

As I always do after a show, here is the seen and heard:

  • Hardware was everywhere, and great usages and advancements continue. That all-glass look with classy hardware is just awesome, and it’s only going to get better. What was the “in” product that seemed to be everywhere? Blinds in-between glass.  Stunning, since that is not exactly a new technology. Also, quite a bit of decorative, though I heard from many that the styles on display were not eye-catching, and I must agree. 
  • The busiest booth? Guardian. Especially on day three of the show. The place was like a Vegas nightclub, with people jam-packed in there. Somewhere in that mass of humanity I did get to chat with the super Amy Hennes, who now has helped point me the right direction at yet another show. Thankfully, I got in on day one of the show before the masses descended on their spot. Also, great to visit with Chris Dolan, Jay Phillips, and Matt Hill. I feel horrible I never could spend time with my favorite Chinese connection, Dan Plotnick. He was just too busy. But not seeing me is best for his street cred in China. 
  • Coolest machinery? Everything I saw was awesome, but two stood out for me. First, the loading/unloading robot that the tremendous guys from Salem showed me at the Bovone booth. That will help efficiency in plants for sure. Second, the cutter from Turomas Tecnocat was incredible. Fast, quiet, and seriously effective. I watched in awe for a while, including a part where it cut 1-inch thick glass like a hot knife through butter. Thank you to Juan Pablo Herrera of IGE for getting me my own private demo there.
  • Seen out and about:

I visited with Doug Marren at Eastman and even saw Aimee Davis as well. She no longer works on our side of the industry, so I never get to see her. So, that was a treat. I met, for the first time, Ruby Singh of Glassfab, who is a seriously good guy. And it was nice to see Mike Goldfarb, also of Glassfab. I had not seen Doug Studt from Torstenson Glass in quite a while, so it was super to run into him. And, it’s always a pleasure and honor to see Bernard Lax of Pulp Studios.

Pat Kenny of PPG was stationed right across from the NGA\WDDA booth, so catching up with him was excellent. It was his first glasstec in many years. Meanwhile Max Hals was making yet another triumphant appearance at the show. He has been at the show every year since 1982. Such a good man, and glad we have the same name, as people confuse us sometimes. I benefit from that deal that’s for sure! Getting to chat with Ren Bartoe of Vesuvius is the best. He interrupted a conversation with others to say hi to me, and I appreciate that. I was able to spend time with Manny Borda of IGE, which was fantastic—pure class, that man is. And speaking of class as well as “cool,” Michael Schmidt of Forel fits that description. Meeting with him in the massive Forel exhibition was a neat experience. And while in that booth I visited with Steve Bouchard of Glass Distributors Inc., which was totally enjoyable.

No Diego Cuevas of Onyx, as he had to work Greenbuild, but their booth was busy, and I got to meet the very sharp and intelligent Mila Plaza who was covering the stand for them. I love that solar is gaining traction. Getting a few minutes with Steve Weidner of NSG/Pilkington was awesome. He treats me better than I deserve. Always good to see Scott Hoover of Tecglass/Arrow as well as spending a little time with Carey and Chris Mobius of Garibaldi.

As for the not seen... I saw Devin Bowman of TGP at the airport in Atlanta, but never saw him at the show. Rob Botman and Jordan Richards of Glassopolis were at the show, but never saw them, and rumor has it they owned the town at night with legendary outings. Nice.

  • Last, on my final day there, I went for a nice (but icy cold) run along the Rhein. Portions of my lungs I think are still behind in Germany floating along that river. Somewhere my running idol, Jeff Ziesche of CRL/US Aluminum, has to be smiling about that one.

I’m sure I missed more than one thing and we’ll catch that next week as we return once again to normal. 

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

During glasstec 2014, Glass Magazine presented a word association challenge to various industry leaders. Hear what officials from HHH Tempering Resources, ICD High Performance Coatings, Glass Distributors Inc., Eastman Chemical, Diamon-Fusion International, Glaston and Ashton Industrial have to say about the show, the economy, trends and what is in store for 2015.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

This week is the big glasstec show in Germany, and I have to admit some nerves are banging around inside my stomach right now. For me the double whammy of a gigantic show and a foreign country really puts me out of my element. But the preparation has been done. Between studying the landscape of the show location, loading the translator on my phone with every question I could think of so I could try and learn how to say it, and going through a list of almost 1,000 exhibitors, I believe I am ready. Hopefully I didn’t either over study or miss something obvious.

Next week, we’ll have my often imitated but never duplicated show review, and the gang at Glass Magazine will have some serious top-notch coverage in e-glass weekly. If you are on Twitter, make sure you are following Glass Magazine (@GlassMag) as the updates will be coming throughout the show.

Elsewhere…

  • The crazy and volatile week on Wall Street surely has added some nerves to many. Our economy still has some fragility, and even things that us “regular” folks take enjoyment in, like lower gas prices, are actually having a negative effect on some parts of the market. With the price of oil actually tanking, this good news of sub $3 gas is now not as joyous. I guess we just can’t win for losing sometimes. 
  • Last week I wrote on the San Diego airport, and I missed an amazing piece of glass work that was so notable, Glass Magazine did a Great Glazing feature on it earlier this year. Thanks and props to my friend Joe Carlos of Triview for the heads up. Great work by Joe, his team and everyone involved on this project. 
  • Catching up on reading this week, I ran into two interesting stories, the first from Laser Focus World.

    Sometimes innovation is not quite ready for prime time, but it’s released and promoted anyway. That’s the case with this clear glass that can collect solar energy. The story is worth a read but check out this quote:

    The big advantage of the Michigan State University design is its lack of hue; the device looks like a piece of ordinary clear plastic. “No one wants to sit behind colored glass,” says Richard Lunt, one of the researchers. “It makes for a very colorful environment, like working in a disco.”

    Yep NO ONE wants to sit behind colored glass. Seriously? Has this guy ever seen the way glass in the year 2014 works? Anyway, I hope this technology eventually works, because it would be good, but surely not because of the "colored" glass issue.

    Also this week, the Washington Post did a piece on spray-coated solar panels. I’ll be curious to see what the esteemed Ted Bleecker says about it (since Ted is a true solar guru). While I am intrigued, this also seems incredibly premature and just not ready for prime time at all. Make sure you read to the comments at the bottom, they surely give some solid perspective. 
  • As I post this, the results of the Columbus Marathon are not in yet, but I’m sending positive vibes and extra lung capacity to my pal Dean Mead of Virginia Glass Products. I give tons of credit to guys like Dean and Joe Erb from Quanex who can just get out there and run... and run...and then run some more... I hope the race was awesome, my friend. 
  • Last this week, to those of you going to Greenbuild, please feel free to drop me a note to let me know how that show is and the pulse of the attendees there. Hopefully all will be positive, though you all know my opinion on that event already. For the good of the industry, I’ll happily be wrong. 

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

As most of you know I am a geek when it comes to energy efficiency and the products in our industry that can improve that process. So when I saw Katy Devlin’s blog last week, I was truly excited. Actually, according to my son, I “marked out,” which comes from the wrestling world when you get overly excited about something you know and hope will happen. Anyway, the details of Katy’s blog, the focus on energy efficiency and the timeline of the many great companies looking to disrupt that space, was a breath of fresh air. I believe we are still at just the start of the process. We have a ton of innovation in the pipelines and ready to come. You can look at where we were, but just get ready, because where we are going is truly something to behold.

Elsewhere…

  • I think these are the dog days of blogging. Not much news happening, but it will pick up with glasstec coming up.
  • My day was made the other day when I saw this news on a former co-worker of mine. Dan Wagner was recently named vice president and general manager of Global Door Controls. I had the honor of working with Dan for several years and I hold him in the highest regard. I am sure he will do a fantastic job in his new position, as he has done everywhere he has been.
  • I am convinced that if you wanted to and had the money/time to do so, you could attend an industry-related function for every week of the year. Our landscape is so packed with seminars, conferences, shows, roundtables, squaretables--it’s absolutely incredible. It brings to mind two questions: How do you decide which event is more worthy than another, and how can you follow the action and information without attending? On the decision of which ones to attend, time really has to be taken to determine if the audience and reach is relevant to your business. For instance, there are quite a few events that promise “architectural interaction,” but they all can’t deliver at a high level and sometimes the smaller ones turn out to be better. You truly need to research who’s there and the conference schedule before deciding. As for following along, thanks to electronic and social media, it’s never been easier. This past week there was an event in New York that I was able to follow via Twitter and I felt like I got a good feel for the discussion and flavor of the event. While nothing will ever replace face-to-face networking, at least from an education standpoint, being able to follow along from afar is truly doable in our current society.
  • I happened to go through the San Diego airport last week and again noticed the glass. The usage inside was decent, but it was the outside, especially some of the curtain walls that really were impressive. Clean design, and the glass and aluminum looked tremendous. I know (from looking at the spacer band) that Viracon supplied the glass, but no idea on the framing and who installed. So whomever did those jobs (and Viracon, too) congrats to you. It looks amazing. Unfortunately my picture does NOT do it justice!
  • The ups and downs of the construction forecasts continue. Non-residential construction only added 3,200 jobs last month which was considered modest growth. Meanwhile, the Dodge Index slipped for the 3rd month in a row. While that index is up 8 percent year over year, this little trend is starting to concern.
  • Last this week, normally I would put this in my Links of the Week, but it’s a pretty cool look inside the McDonald’s Monopoly promotion going on right now. It is amazing how heavily the odds are against you.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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