From the fabricator: Greenbuild recap

Greenbuild might have hit its plateau last week after a rough outing in Toronto. Traffic was down, which was shocking considering the show was in Canada for the first time. Worse yet was the layout of the show floor. There were two halls separated by a 15-minute walk. Most attendees went to the hall closest to the street and didn't make it to the other. As far as whether or not more decision makers would fill the floor, the answer was a resounding "no." Younger associates and students still were in the major majority. The show moves to San Francisco next year, so it will be very interesting to see if that site brings in the crowds.

Other Greenbuild musings...

  • The city of Toronto is very busy building-wise. Something like 131 high-rises are in various phases of construction there, and there are these things called "cranes" all over town. (I haven't seen many of those since 2006/07!) What's funny though is when you compliment someone from our industry who works the Toronto market. They look down, as if they don't want to acknowledge it out of fear of maybe jinxing their positive fortune right now.
  • On the floor... Dorma's booth was epic and it was good to see Rich Albright there. He is always on the ball. I liked Southwall's booth and was impressed by their R-20 window. Spotted Tom O'Malley of Doralco from afar, but never got to catch up with him; just too popular. Speaking of popular, the folks at Viracon were in typical high demand. I got to see the always awesome Farrah Hoffman, and watched Garret Henson do several media sessions. I now wonder how long it will be until Garret has his own PR team. I visited with Tom Herron of NFRC and Kerry Haglund of the Efficient Windows Collaborative and both were very nice to me; much appreciated. They are class folks. And I got to meet in person for the first time, an industry PR legend in Heather West. That was cool.
  • Last note on the show and town: Toronto has the worst traffic ever. Simply miserable trying to get anywhere quick. I have a whole new respect for my friends that live there.

Elsewhere...

  • The news Friday that Solutia was buying Southwall Technologies was very interesting. Solutia is a very good company and very shrewd. Obviously, the details are pretty preliminary at this point, so this will be a deal to watch going forward.
  • As those who know me know, I love the Rocky movies. They are my favorites. So I tell you with great excitement that the new movie "Real Steel" has some serious Rocky-like qualities. It's almost like the "Rocky" for the new century. Great flick.

Last this week, congratulations to Greg Landry on his new gig at Agalite in Anaheim, Calif. Great guy with a great company; sounds like a nice marriage! 

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors. 

 

Comments

There were halls separated by a 15-minute walk. Most attendees went to the hall closest to the street and didn't make it to the other 642-874 dumps. As far as whether or not more decision makers would fill the floor, the answer was a resounding "no." More youthful associates and students still were in the major majority. The show moves to San Francisco next year http://www.sure-braindumps.com/70-646.htm, so it will be fascinating to see if that site brings in the crowds.

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