glassblog

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

News of big price increases hit the industry the last few weeks. There’s no question that costs have gone up on everything, not only in our industry, but in our lives as a whole. Whether it’s groceries or building supplies, the cost to produce, handle and ship has been rising pretty consistently in recent times. In most industries, a price increase is what it is; but in this one, nothing is easy or as it seems. Will this be an increase that sticks, or will this just be another footnote in our crazy past of handling costs? There’s a ton of dynamics at play here, and it sure will be something to watch.

Elsewhere….

  • The Olympics kicked off this past Friday and I had two main thoughts:The lack of a moment of silence for the athletes murdered in 1972 continues to be a major stain on the Olympic movement. While small and private memorials have been held, the Olympic organizers absolutely refuse to recognize or honor the victims of that heinous time on a legitimate, world stage. So my message to the organizers: keep avoiding facing it head on and the drumbeat for the need to honor the victims will just keep growing. Why doing the right thing is so hard here is beyond me. Also beyond me, most of that opening ceremony! Weird and bizarre are two words that sum up most of it. Plus, who woulda thunk The Pet Shop Boys would have a song played during an Olympic opening… crazy.
  • Congrats to the National Glass Association for an Olympic-sized victory this week. The NGA was one of the groups behind the HR 4078 legislation that will streamline the time-consuming permitting process, bring transparency to rules issued by agencies as a result of an out-of-court agreement, and prohibit agencies from issuing a cascade of regulations when a change of administration occurs. Basically, this bill reduces the massive red tape that small business owners have to face when building their business. Nice to see the National Glass Association really getting into it, and let’s hope the Senate now does the right thing and continues this momentum.
  • The update on GlassBuild America: Tuesday, July 31, is the last day for the awesome rates at the Las Vegas Hilton hotel. So jump off this blog now by clicking here, and book before the rates go up. The actual hotel block is still available through August 21, but you know you’re going to the show, so why wait? Book now!
  • Last this week... a good friend of mine called me this week and took me to task about my blog. It’s boring and the same stuff over and over again he excitedly told me. He mentioned that he still reads it weekly but it's just not cutting it lately. I heard him out and agreed with a lot of it, as this summer has been very slow for news and opinion, and it does seem like some subjects have been more prominent than others. We are in the dog days, and I have found myself caught up in it. In any case, I am aware of it and will keep grinding along to try to bring you the blog you expect and have been supporting since 2005. I appreciate everyone who reads, comments, e-mails, etc., so keep it coming.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, July 23, 2012

"The best way to predict the future is to create it." -Peter Drucker

Most economic forecasters are predicting the construction industry in the United States will likely grow at a very slow rate over the next few years. Our fenestration industry sales are expected to limp along as well. However, I believe sales could improve dramatically with some active technological and production developments, coupled with appropriate pricing.

Fenestration and glass already offer many static features at reasonable price points. Combining multiple, active technologies with existing, static products could conceivably take fenestration and glass beyond the architectural envelope and transform them into multi-functioning devices that completely change the way they are viewed. Consumer awareness and demand is there. People are ready to buy now if mass production exists, the products work well and the prices are right.

Imagine combining these technologies with residential and commercial fenestration:

  • Interactive touch screens
  • Video
  • Signage
  • Variable privacy film
  • Variable tinting film 
  • Changing decoration
  • Solar energy collection
  • Sensor-activated functions
  • Power controls
  • Lighting and lighting control

I’m no scientist or industrial engineer, just a consumer. I’m impatient for the future shown in Corning’s ‘A Day Made of Glass’ video. Curtain wall as active signage like that in the classic film Blade Runner has always been an intriguing vision. It’s exciting to imagine what the world will be like when those products are out there and in common use. I’m also impatient to become a dealer for new and exciting products.

While some of these new product features currently exist, they’re either not being combined into multi-function consumer products, they’re not effectively mass-produced and/or their price point isn’t right. Manufacturers that can reliably and economically produce more of the new, active technologies in combination with existing, static glass and fenestration products will tend to profit and grow faster over time than those who don’t.

"We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims." - R. Buckminster Fuller

Rod Van Buskirk is the third-generation owner of Bacon & Van Buskirk Glass Co., with locations in Champaign and Springfield, Ill. A past NGA Chairman, Rod looks quarterly at the industry from the middle of nowhere, steals ideas from anyone he can and pretends to know what he’s talking about. Rod invites your comments as you are certainly smarter than he is.

Monday, July 23, 2012

That awful sound you might be hearing is the Architecture Billings Index gasping for air. Can it really be happening again? Once you think you have made it out of the woods, you realize you’re still lost. In any case, the news last week that the ABI is still trending in negative territory was brutal. And considering that the graph of the ABI from year to year looks eerily similar, 2013 could take the same shape as 2012. Part of me believes the ABI and its ilk are just educated guesses anyway, but even if that's true, people believe and follow them. Bottom line is we are still in tenuous territory. That said, does any of this matter? The election in November is going to move the needle one way or another, and all of the future research is basically worthless because of that. So we wait…

Elsewhere…

  • I got great insight and reaction to my post last week about SAM saving the day.  The best was the education I received from people who have dealt with spontaneous breakage due to nickel sulfide, and how hard it is to find. These folks pretty much shot down SAM’s effectiveness. So, now I am curious to see how this program will actually work, as the experts I talked with were pretty adamant that this is wishful thinking.
  • Anyone else having trouble picking their winners for the Glass Magazine Awards? Man, it is brutal; so many great candidates. I am betting these elections are going to be insanely close, so please vote. Best of all, this is a great and fair way to recognize talent. Even being nominated is huge. There are no politics in the selection process, which is really refreshing.
  • Great tweet from the account of ICD last week with a story on “green” being old news and “zero impact” being the future. Totally dead on. The zero impact approach really is the next frontier. The story is here, and if you want to follow a person who is constantly linking to interesting and need-to-know stuff, follow ICD and my pal the glass pundit, Kris Vockler.
  • Speaking of “green”… Last Wednesday, a new group was announced that brings together a lot of building and construction associations. The American High-Performance Buildings Coalition is going to do something that I have been preaching here for a long time: get into the real crux of the green movement and ensure that the development of all green standards makes sense. This group will be ANSI accredited, which is a positive too. Hopefully, it can be fair and transparent--not biased or political--and make these programs truly effective.
  • In my weekly look at GlassBuild America news:  the Innovative Product Pavilion has sold out. That is awesome news; it proves that the technological advancements in our industry are not a fable, but true blue. So, on the floor in Las Vegas will be the technology that will take our industry into the future, and that is extremely exciting. I am not sure how anyone in business can choose to miss this… So there ya go, my weekly plug for the show; be there!
  • Last this week, back in December 2010, I ran this story about an online eyeglass seller who let bad reviews drive his business and then bullied people who purchased from him. Basically, he did the opposite of what we all try to do, but it was working… until the guy eventually went too far with his threats and was arrested. Now, an update comes that his bail has been revoked, and he is still in business. Amazing.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, July 16, 2012

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of touring two glass industry plants in Minnesota: the Cardinal CG location in Northfield and the Erdman Automation facility in Princeton. The plants provide very different services to the industry: Cardinal offers coating, high-volume cutting and tempering services; and Erdman produces a variety of machines for window manufacturers and IG fabricators. However, they are similarly impressive in their skill, service level and ability to address the challenges of a still-lackluster economy through investment and diversification.

Vern Volkert, plant superintendent, served as tour guide for the Cardinal CG plant, held as part of the Window and Door Manufacturers Association Technical Conference, June 26-28, in Bloomington, Minn. (We couldn’t take photos during the tour, but Cardinal has a nice video of the plant on their web site—click “Cardinal Plant Tours” in the menu; the CG plant tour begins at 6:57.)

While the facility is not operating at full capacity—it employs between 150 and 160 at its max, and currently has about 90 to 100 workers—the company has taken strides to improve and update its equipment, and ready itself for an evolving industry. An impressive recent addition is the company’s new coater. After two years of preparation, Cardinal recently brought online a second coating machine that was designed specifically for the solar market, allowing it to diversify into a new business segment. As the company waits for solar to pick up, it is running residential products on the state-of-the-art line.

In an additional move to face economic challenges with innovation, Cardinal has started making its own equipment. The Northfield plant is already using some Cardinal washers.

North 90 miles, officials at the Erdman Automation facility are also relying on innovation and diversification to thrive and even grow in the current economy. The company, which primarily served the window and door market in 2006, is now serving the curtain wall, insulating glass and solar industries as well. Erdman is also expanding geographically. “In the early years, we were just in the United States,” says Jim Tibesar, sales manager. “Now we’re in Canada, South America, China and Europe. We recently started working with a customer in Barbados.” Tibesar led the tour, along with Paul VanKempen, general manager; Michael Schmidt, IG sales specialist; and Jessica Erdman, marketing manager.

The company has made investments in its own machinery, including the purchase of an advanced bridge mill machine. And, Erdman has made investments in its product line to serve advancements in the industry, such as its secondary sealant applicator for triple-glazed IGUs, and its machinery products for solar. Below is a video from Erdman demonstrating its Solar Frame Assembly Station.

Devlin is senior editor for Glass Magazine. Write her at kdevlin@glass.org.

Monday, July 16, 2012

When I saw the news come across GlassMagazine.com about a robot that could help inspect glass on Toronto condos, I immediately clicked on it. I assume you are aware of the whole “glass falling from the condo” issue in Toronto (and elsewhere, but mostly Toronto). Now with this news, there could be a whole new angle. The robot SAM could scan the building and find the areas of need and distress. If this robot actually  works--and I am sure there are experts out there who believe it won’t--it could be a major player in the downtown high-rise markets for skittish developers worried about glass falling out. I still believe at the end of the day all balcony material should go to laminated, but that would only be new buildings. The thousands of current structures are here to stay, and now maybe we can get a glimpse into the future.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of glass breakage, I saw the story a few weeks back that glass at the new World Trade Center was damaged after being struck by a load of steel moved by a huge gust of wind. Thankfully, no one was hurt, and all is still supposedly on schedule. If true, I have to assume that the glass was made in the U.S. and did not consist of materials that came from overseas. I would have been curious to see how badly it would have turned out if it had been the overseas stuff. It could’ve been a great lesson for the Port Authority. Then again, they could probably care less.
  • This week’s note on GlassBuild America focuses on the networking aspect. Plain and simple: no other event brings the amount of people--quality, connected people--to one place like the show does. Add in the awesome reception (always the night of the first day of the show) sponsored by the fine folks at Quanex, and you have the recipe to not only network to the best of your ability but have a great night too. GBA is less than 60 days away!
  • Gotta say that last week’s post surely had legs. This blog was the first place that the info on Serious Energy appeared, including the ousting of Kevin Surace. Soon after, a San Francisco paper followed suit, as did others. Then the video of the week on the amazing 3D printing ended up as a front-section story in USA Today. And yes, I am sure it was all coincidence, but it sure was nice to be ahead of the curve!
  • Are you all as conflicted as me on who to vote for in the Glass Magazine Awards? Some amazing candidates! A massive congratulations is due to everyone nominated and the great companies that employ them.
  • Last this week… This link brings big news: The end of the world is not coming on December 21, 2012, as the Mayans supposedly predicted. New evidence and research is showing that 12/21/12 was just the end of the Mayan calendar. So, we have to still keep working…

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Every day, business owners/managers face tough situations. Maybe a competitor hires one of your key people. An employee rolls a company vehicle down an embankment, totaling the vehicle and knocking down an electricity pole. Or, you leave costs out of an estimate and realize the job will incur a loss. Sound familiar? What is your initial reaction? I suspect we fear the worst will happen.

People believe the extremes are the truth. The extreme causes us to fear. Our fear is of the unknown, not the known. Once we have knowledge, we begin to deal with fear. When we act based upon knowledge, we begin to defeat fear. When we complete the action, we defeat fear and build confidence.

Positive realism is analyzing what is the worst that will happen and what is the best that will happen. The final result will be somewhere between the extremes.

Will we lose business because the salesperson went to a competitor? Possibly. Can the salesperson be replaced? Probably. Replace the salesperson and mitigate the damage.

Will the accident cause our insurance premium to rise? Probably. Can the vehicle be replaced? Yes. Is the employee alright? Thankfully, yes. Buy a more fuel-efficient replacement vehicle, and lower long-term costs.

Will a loss on this job bankrupt the company? Probably not. When we complete the job, even at a loss, will our customer be satisfied? Probably. Is there a way we can reduce the loss and possibly break even or create a small profit? Possibly. Will we have a chance to recoup some of the loss with this customer in the future? Yes.

In each of these cases, I knew how to handle the situation. I did not go to the extreme and dwell on the worst case scenario. However, just having knowledge is not enough. I acted on my knowledge and my fear of the outcome evaporated.

Two rules: Knowledge overcomes fear. Action cures fear. 

The author is president of Evans Glass Co., and chairman-elect of the National Glass Association. Write him at bevans@evansglasscompany.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

I hope everyone had a good holiday. Though having the holiday on a Wednesday made for a seriously disjointed work week!

GlassBuild America is about two months away, and judging from the suppliers lining up to attend the show, it’s going to be a terrific event. In this world in which we live, information and knowledge leads to power, and the Vegas display offers a “powerful” opportunity.

As a supporter of the show, obviously I am biased. But take that away and look at some of the people and products that will be on display, and you will see where I am going with this. The technology and innovation being readied are difference-makers, and the people that attend GlassBuild America will benefit. Those who stay home will be steps behind. So, starting with this week’s post, I’ll make one note a week here on the blog about GlassBuild America, just because I believe it’s THAT important. And I’m also sure you’ll be hearing tons more about the show in the next 30-45 days. But, take a few minutes, review the current trade show floor, and go book your flights and hotels, as the prices are pretty economical. It’s worth it folks, plain and simple.

Elsewhere…

  • Quietly, it looks like Kevin Surace is now gone officially from Serious Materials. Surace surely made a heck of an impression in his short time in the industry. He was a memorable keynote speaker at the Glazing Executives Forum last year and was never shy with an opinion or new approach. He was a lightning rod for sure. My favorite was when Surace blogged that the window industry needed to shed 50 percent of its capacity. Pretty bizarre since you know we’d all like half our competitors to just “give up,” and his company actually was adding capacity, including grabbing plants for publicity more than production. All that said, you now have to wonder what happens next there. Especially, will the famous Chicago plant (the sit-in plant, where Surace rode to the rescue) be sold to the employees, as they want? Going to be interesting…
  • Hot enough for everyone? Hopefully, my friends in the DC/Virginia area are starting to get back to normal after the brutal storms. Mother Nature has not been kind.
  • There were some sneaky good tweets by Mark Silverberg of Technoform during the Facades Tectonics Conference last week. He linked to a few good pieces, and he passed on a great line from conference speaker Mic Patterson of Enclos: “We must innovate our way to sustainability in the building sector.” Right on guys! Oh and to clarify, I say “sneaky” because Mark is like the “EF Hutton” of Tweeters… when he tweets, people listen! (At least I do)
  • Speaking of good tweets, Glass Magazine’s Katy Devlin kept everyone up to date on what sounded like a great WDMA meeting in Minnesota. The highlights, once again, were the advanced technology (see that theme again!) that are an absolute must for our industry to thrive.
  • Was introduced to one of the brains behind Swarf Buster this past week. I had heard of them and seen them mentioned on blogs and on LinkedIn, but honestly I never knew what/who they were. So it was pretty cool to actually get some knowledge. Turns out to be a fascinating product too, as I never knew about “swarfs,” and its effect on glass fabrication. (Swarfs are the dust and leftover particles that end up bonding together to gunk up glass fabrication equipment like polishers). You learn something new every day. I hope to see them at the show!
  • Last this week is this comical story from New Jersey about the New York Giants and Jets filing a lawsuit to stand in the way of some redevelopment in the area around their stadium. The teams are worried about the traffic it will cause during their game days. Uh, can we get any more short sighted? Football teams play once per week. So, sure, let’s stand in its way right? Unreal.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Tough times persist for those in the construction industry, with the Associated General Contractors of America reporting 27 states and Washington, D.C., lost construction jobs in May, more than at any point since June 2011.

And while the glass industry continues to experience job losses of its own--within the past two years, at least six contract glaziers have closed their doors--there is some encouraging news on the employment front. 

According to Glass Magazine's Top 50 Glaziers annual survey, glaziers began adding to their workforces in 2011, with 62 percent of respondents reporting an increase in employees from 2010. This is in stark contrast to the previous year, when the majority of respondents reported a decrease in their workforce. 

It might be too early to label this an "upward trend," and the Top 50 Glazier statistics do not include employment figures for those firms that went out of business. But, it does mark the second year in a row in which employment stats among the Top 50 Glaziers moved in a positive direction, and that's a start.

Chase is editorial director of Glass Magazine, GlassMagazine.com and e-glass weekly. Write her at jchase@glass.org.

Monday, June 25, 2012

I am starting off with a non-industry topic this week because it really shook me up. It is the insanely depressing video of a 68-year-old bus monitor being verbally abused by the middle school-aged kids on her bus. The whole entire scene was hard to watch and stomach. Quite frankly, it scares me as a father and worries me that my children are headed into a world with these kids as their “peers.” Meanwhile, the video has gone viral, and many people are stepping up to show appreciation for the woman who took this abuse. But it has also brought out even more crazies sending death threats to anyone associated with the school. So this thing continues to mushroom, and I guess we know where these kids get it.

But back to the original sin here: the vulgar treatment of the bus monitor, who by the way has been a picture of class and grace in the days following. Those kids are the future, and at 12+ years old they are way off the right path. This wasn’t some “kids being kids” sort of approach in my mind. This was off the charts. The respect level is non-existent, and that is a core value that is gone. This is lax parenting and too much of the negative ills in our society showing in full bloom. These children are the same age as my kids, and I would be devastated and mortified if my kids would take part in this. I would hope my wife and I have taught and raised them better. We can only hope that with this going on all over the world right now that a lesson can be learned.

Elsewhere…

  • If the above wasn’t depressing enough, last week in the glass and glazing world surely was. The latest Architecture Billings Index came out, and it was horrible. But worse than the numbers was the comment from Kermit Baker, AIA's chief economist: "For the second year in a row, we're seeing declines in springtime design activity after a healthy first quarter," he said. "This should be an alarm bell going off for the design and construction industry. ... The commercial/industrial sector is the only one recording gains in design activity at present. And even this sector has slowed significantly. Construction forecasters will have to reassess what conditions will look like moving forward.” That quote is worrisome, especially the end. I don’t think these construction forecasters have a clue really. Sometimes, I think they create these numbers from thin air to give me something to blog about. Anyway, we’ll see how this progresses. The first milestones to really watch are next spring. That is the stretch where the ABI was connected to when it ran positive for several months.
  • What else was bad this week? The other tracking measurement we use, the new Dodge Momentum Index, came down as well, off 1.2 percent from April. The latest construction material and construction employment reports both went down as well.  Oh, and while we’re lamenting the week, it ends with a report that we are now at the lowest rate of homeownership in 15 years.
  • And while we are at it, China warned that it was running out of its rare earth materials, a scary announcement for our glass and mirror makers, especially since I think that it’s a way for the Chinese government to revitalize its economy by limiting supply and thus raising prices. (Did I just write a sentence that said the Chinese government would promote higher prices? What is happening to me? I have no issue at all with raising prices, I do take issues with artificial shortages.) So while I seriously doubt they are running out, this “news” has the potential to disrupt our world while the posturing goes on.
  • And lets grab some salt for the wounds. We also had another glazier go bankrupt, and it won’t be the last, unfortunately. And speaking of bankruptcy, we just passed the year anniversary of Vitro America’s bankruptcy sale finalization. There’s surely a lot to say on that one, but I’ll refrain other than to say it sure has been an interesting 12 months. Hopefully, next week gets better.
  • Last this week, congrats to my good friend Manny and all of the Miami Heat fans. (And for some who hate LeBron and the Heat this could be considered part of the “bad week” mentioned above!)

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Very interesting study released by PPG Industries at the end of last week. They commissioned a study of architects, and it covered a wide range of subjects. The headline piece was that the architects surveyed expect building integrated clean energy sources to increase. However, I think that is a folly somewhat. I think most architects want to do the right thing, but in the end simply can’t because of costs, supply, sources, etc. If, however, this can happen, and architects are able to get these net zero style products in the specifications (and through the value engineering built to knock them out), we’ll surely be on a great path. Long way to go, though.

There was one other item from the study that truly stunned me too. PPG actually finished 5th in name recognition. Maybe it’s because I grew up in Pittsburgh, or maybe it’s my respect for such wonderful PPG folks like Keith Pettigrew, Jan Rogan, Glenn Miner, and so on that I always thought they would be one or two. But, in this survey they trail USG, Armstrong, Kawneer, and CertainTeed. Kawneer I could see, the others, since they are out my world, were major surprises. Nonetheless, an intriguing read.

Elsewhere....

  • Hope everyone had a great Father’s Day. A favorite part of this industry is how many fathers and sons are in it together, so this holiday really means a ton in our world.
  • Heard through the grapevine that NeoCon, the big decorative show was solid, but not spectacular. Guardian really made a heck of an impression with a big social media push that led to good crowds at their booth. No doubt those guys have really committed to using the online world to help drive business/awareness. Also from the show, I was sent pictures of the GGI booth, and it looked impressive, and otherwise was able to keep up on the rest of the goings on thanks to the excellent twitter feed of ICD Coatings’ Steve O’Hollaren (@SteveO_ICD).
  • Want to know a frustrating scammy sort of deal? I was due an upgrade on my phone, so I went in and got a new one. All was fine. Got the new phone and life was peachy. But then my bill came and I saw this $30 charge for an “upgrade fee,” something no one had told me. Evidently it’s a legit charge in their minds, but pretty dastardly and wrong if you ask me.
  • Looked like some serious work got done, as always, at the recent IGMA meetings. I love the focus on the NREL testing and thermal stress piece. To me all of the technical work done there has some serious importance in our world and everyone who isn’t attending and involved should be happy that those who are there are looking out for our best interests.
  • Last this week, thanks to friend of the blog and very happy Kings fan Joe Carlos of TriView Glass. These are giant portraits printed on grass. Not glass, but GRASS. Crazy..

Read on for links and clip of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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