What's your legacy?

"This could all be yours one day." In my 23 years in the glass industry, I have known many business owner parents who have said similar words to a would-be heir and have been rejected. Real or imagined, there's a sense that careers in high-tech or finance appeal more than the world of construction or manufacturing, even if it means calling your own shots once dad or mom (finally) retire.

Recently, it seems I'm hearing more prodigal son/daughter stories. Rick Dominguez, Jordon Glass Machinery, grew up seeing his father come home tired after long, sweaty days cutting and installing glass in and around Miami. "I didn't want any part of that," he recalls. So Rick pursued an accounting degree and landed at a top multinational firm in the Northeast.

As it happens, he, too, put in very long days, working up mega-corporation financials plans. But the salary did not pay out in fulfillment. When a new opportunity arose to morph the family glass business into a glass equipment import sales company, Rick came home.

On a recent visit to Jordon, several things jumped out at me. The kids' toys tucked under desks and alongside tools in the shop; the relaxed, smiling atmosphere; and the Glass Magazine float manufacturing poster hanging on the wall behind Rick's desk.

Rick's life changed when he opted to apply his financial skill set to his family-focused world of glass. Though he still works hard to grow the business, he also has time for projects that bring him greater fulfillment in life--such as applying his social media skills to host "Theology on Tap" gatherings. Scroll down to the third photo.

Inspiring? I think so, starting with how to attract top young talent into--or back to--the family glass business.

Harris is publisher of Glass Magazine. Write her at nharris@glass.org.

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