glassblog

Monday, August 15, 2016

If you missed the excellent blog on tradeshows by Ron Crowl of Fenetech last week, I strongly suggest you check it out. I thought in the very quick and creative way he wrote it, he got the message across on the importance of tradeshows. It’s something that I have been harping on for a while and will continue to do so. If you are not attending these events, with the next big one in the U.S. being GlassBuild America, you are really doing yourself a disservice personally and professionally. 

One key part of GlassBuild that you do no want to miss is the Glazing Executives Forum. I was thrilled to see that Sapa jumped on board this past week as a sponsor. They have done so in the past, so to see them back was exciting. I truly appreciate and respect the way they support the industry with events like this and their internal educational pieces as well. Props obviously also must go to the others that are sponsoring: YKK (loyal sponsor of this for several years), Tremco, Ergo Robotics, Roto Frank, and Novagard Solutions. As an industry guy, thank you for doing your part for our world.

Elsewhere…

  • I know I have been going overboard on the econ numbers lately, but here’s a great story to share on some of the metrics not watched as closely as well as some specific looks at markets and trends. Worth the read.
  • This may be an old piece but thanks to old friend Scott Goodman of AGC for sending along. The suspended pool in London. Does anyone know, has this been built yet?
  • Congrats to Richard Wilson of AGNORA for being a finalist in the EY Entrepreneur of the Year contest going on in Ontario. AGNORA surely has done some innovative things that are being recognized. Plus I love when our industry has people noticed in overall award categories and not just industry centric. Makes us all look good. Best of luck, Richard!
  • And while we’re on the path of congrats, a hearty one to the McClatchey family of SAF. They just celebrated their 70th year in business. Every interaction I have ever had with this company is always positive, plus they are another company that seemingly is always exhibiting and supporting every show. Congrats, gang!
  • I have to talk Olympics and just how enjoyable the first week was. Some incredible performances and stories. Katie Ledecky is off the charts. Anthony Ervin, winning a gold 16 YEARS after doing it the first time and at the "ancient" age of 35 was awesome. Maya DiRado wowed me. And the two Simones. Manuel and Biles were historical difference makers. Last but not least, Michael Phelps. Wow. And no way do I think he’s actually retiring after this Olympiad either. The second week of these games will surely have a long way to go to catch the excitement of the first!
  • Last this week, the annual “Old Farmers Almanac” Forecast is now out for this winter. Remember it has an 80 percent accuracy rate. This blurb from Country Living Magazine sums it up:

Every region of the U.S. will be hit with a different type of terrible. The Northeast and Midwest can expect "colder than normal" temperatures and precipitation is supposed to be "above normal." If you're in the Pacific Northwest, you can expect a lot of rain and chilly weather. And in the Intermountain and Appalachian regions, where ski enthusiasts would actually like cold temperatures and lots of snow, it's set to largely be warmer and less snowy than usual.

The story did note the South would have a very mild winter. So good for all of you who live there. As for the rest of us, here’s rooting for this forecast to be wrong!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 15, 2016

Like me, I’m sure you’ve described to others your profession in the ‘glass industry’ with the requisite blank stares and polite head nods that ensue from the listener. We need to rethink our description. In reality, I would argue you are part of a dynamic and exciting industry that exemplifies American values and success. 

Each day, I have the pleasure of reading about the myriad ideas our industry is actively pursuing. Some of these ideas will be proven successful, and as a result better the lives of the end user, the new hire at the successful company, or future innovations that are a subsequent result. The ongoing success of the architectural glass business has always depended on developing higher and higher performing materials, all born from your ideas.

Reading through various historical accounts of glass making, I’m struck by three broad innovation trends, which involve improvements in glass chemistry, production and systems. Chemistry improvements in glass include the addition of lead oxide to make glass more attractive and easier to work with, while production improvements include the invention of methods for producing plate glass and eventually float glass, to name a few.

At the same time, our industry has excelled at pioneering ever better systems to use our products to create functional and beautiful architecture--think curtain walls, point-supported glazing and other systems that combine high-performing components into beneficial assemblies that stretch the possibilities of building design and performance.

The systems innovation tradition continues today with new systems coming to market, including more aesthetic options for fire-rated glass assemblies. The availability of butt-glazed, exterior silicone glazed curtain walls, or fire-rated glass floors are a tremendous leap forward from the 100-square-inch panel of wired glass of only a few decades ago.

Most importantly, these industry ideas and innovations come from people of all backgrounds and walks of life, freely pursuing their own vision of betterment. This is especially true in America, and more specifically, one that our glass industry and people exemplify well. Your ideas, innovation and improvement are what make this wonderful country tick for all of us: thank you!

So the next time someone asks you what you do for a living, you could easily say “I’m an inventor, entrepreneur or innovator making this world a better place.” But then again, saying you’re in the ‘glass industry’ already accomplishes all three. Let’s keep the great ideas coming.

Jeff Razwick is the president of Technical Glass Products, a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. He writes frequently about the design and specification of glazing for institutional and commercial buildings, and is a past chair of the Glass Association of North America’s Fire-Rated Glazing Council. He can be reached at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors. 

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

I know it seems I am constantly talking about forecasts and economic conditions, and it’s probably because I am. Basically I get asked a few times a week about the economy, about the different projections online, and about the different data points, so I like sharing it here. This week had more of the same because several stories came out with reviews of both the first six months of 2016 and more recent month-to-month reporting. The story tones were mixed, mostly because the data was. 

On the positive side, the AIA released a mid-year update, and while noting several roadblocks current and possible, the report was very confident in a positive finish to 2016 and an entire 2017. 

On the flip side, Dodge had their midyear piece and was not as confident, focusing more on the fact that we had fantastic growth and it’s slowing down a bit from that.  Add to that the release that construction spending went down for a third straight month, and you could start sensing concern. The analysts I follow and trust are still very much in the positive camp and actually expect some of these reports to be revised up after further review. A good, quick piece from Bloomberg spells some of it out. Plus we are actually still ahead of 2015 by 6 percent. Basically we are quibbling over how much growth and not just staying positive. In addition, the mid-year consensus has growth predicted to finish at almost 6 percent this year AND next.

Still, the memories of 2009 and 2010 are amazingly fresh in many of our minds and the time it took to really get cranking again seemed to be forever. So whenever we have these blips on the radar, it does cause some angst. Bottom line for me right now is we’re in a good place. Let’s keep rolling but continue to monitor the trends.

One item that can and will have an effect, but is still unknown, is the U.S. Presidential election. In normal cycles a Presidential election has an effect of some type. For those of us living in the U.S., this cycle is as far from normal as you can get. So that is surely an item to always have in the back of your head.

Elsewhere…

  • I am surely one who tries to support anything sustainable, but I have a question for those of you experts out there. I am online ordering tickets for a few upcoming ballgames. The site notes in order to “stay green” that paper tickets are unavailable. OK that makes sense.  ut then they note, mobile and electronic entry are not available so you need to “print your tickets at home.” So my question is, how are we being more sustainable if I print the tickets vs. the venue printing?  
  • Fun picture-laden piece that came via the great Twitter feed of Viracon’s Garret Henson (@Viracon_Garret) on fritted glass. I love looking at the buildings and usage of glass, but I will say the article is a bit shortsighted. There are many more options than they listed or focused on to meet these aesthetic goals, and I would’ve liked to have seen them mentioned. Despite that glaring omission, I love when glass is shown off like this. I just may have to do my own splashy photo piece showing the options!
  • On that note of great looking glass, I really enjoyed the blog post from Moon Shadow's Kris Iverson last week on the Glassblog. Clear, concise and helpful piece, and yet another reminder that communication rules.
  • Last this week, The Olympics are underway. If you can remember, this was the one that the U.S. badly wanted for Chicago. The effort fell short back in 2009 when the games were awarded, but can you imagine IF Chicago would’ve won? With the security shown at four-day events like political conventions, I could only imagine the mess Chicago would’ve been during this. Oh, and with an Olympiad that close, I would’ve done everything to go, too… I know my pal Tom O’Malley of Clover Architectural with his Chicago connections would’ve taken great care of me!

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

This past weekend I had the opportunity to attend my 35th high school reunion. Since graduating in 1981, my 75 classmates and I have managed to come together every five years—truly a testament to the bonds of our friendship. 

During the evening, we learned whose parents have passed on, whose children have married and had babies of their own, whose jobs have changed, and who has retired. There was plenty of reminiscing, catching up and pulling up images of children and grandchildren on smartphones, while again marveling at this ingenious creation that was unheard of 35 years ago. 

And then it was over. 

Reunions are a time to look back at the past, to rummage through the dusty corners of our minds for memories, and to discover and hopefully capture some small pieces of our youth. Though “a good time was had by all,” I left this gathering of friends feeling at once nostalgic and happy, yet somehow a bit sad. 

Nevertheless, just as I looked forward to my class reunion, I am now looking forward to tradeshow season. But I know I won’t leave with anything but a light heart and a head full of ideas. Tradeshows are a gathering where folks with something in common come together on a yearly basis, but for altogether different reasons and with altogether different outcomes. Though the same exchanges occur among attendees, one leaves with more than just an ache for the past and promises to “keep in touch.” 

Tradeshows inspire, excite and engage those who attend. There is a takeaway, a prize at the end that you can put to use to make your operations more efficient and profitable, and of value to your employees. Best of all, there occurs the exchange of ideas among friends who share a passion for what they do. Yes, there are presentations and demonstrations that ultimately lead to transformations, but above all else are the conversations among attendees, both veterans and those new to the show.

At a tradeshow, there’s little time to look back at the past. The goal is to look toward the future. No one is there to capture anything but ideas. No one leaves without becoming inspired. And for the duration of the show, relationships are forged—truly a testament to the bonds of collegiality.

Ron Crowl is president and CEO of FeneTech Inc. Contact him at ron.crowl@fenetech.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 1, 2016

This week we’ll start with something other than glass, but something many people in the glass and glazing industry really got behind and supported--the Ice Bucket Challenge. News broke that the money raised from the Ice Bucket Challenge two years ago led to a major breakthrough in the research of the ALS disease. You all deserve a pat on the back.  

The money raised during that time--a staggering 220 million--funded the biggest study ever. And during that study, researchers identified a gene that has given them a jump start on a possible cure and therapy. Obviously, a long way to go on this one, but it is positive news and something so many of us can say we had a part in. The Ice Bucket Challenge really was like no other event I can remember in bringing people together and allowing them to have their moment of fun for all to see--all while raising money and now succeeding in helping fight this disease. To all of you out there who read this and did it, congrats and thank you!

Elsewhere…

  • The latest edition of Glass Magazine is out and as always some “must see” items are in there. First and foremost, it’s the 2016 Glass Magazine Awards issue,so surely worth checking out the best of the best and those who were talented enough to win the most prestigious recognition our industry has.  The main takeaway from this award issue is that we have great companies who innovate at so many levels. This is one surely to be proud of.
  • Also catch the continuation of the “succession” series and a nice piece on the class-act Mammen family as they take a new step with their company. 
  • The ad of the month? Security Lock Distributors wins it with the “Technical Assistance” play. The ad was smart and bold and made me stop and read. I don’t know this company well at all, so it shows the ad was effective in catching my eye. So whoever there worked on this one, congrats on a job well done!
  • One of the award winners in the magazine was the new Minnesota Vikings stadium that opens this month. This week I ran across an article that I thought did a good job running down the timeline of the building of this structure and the various issues. Take a look, and especially see the comment section as a local architect surely did not agree with the article--at all. 
  • For my Denver readers, I came across this piece breaking down the redevelopment of the old Stapleton airport area. Sounds like things are progressing. So does Denver have the roadmap for other municipalities to follow in the future? I guess only time will tell, but nice to see the moves to redevelop the area are in motion. Especially since I currently live in an area (Metro Detroit) that has struggled mightily to do the same. 
  • Last this week, normally this sort of story would go in my “Links” section, but I had to put here because it’s just too hard to believe. Used cooking oil is a hot resource in Chicago. I’m floored by this one

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 1, 2016

There are many challenges that arise while working with custom, decorative glass. Each project has its own unique attributes and the challenges are always different. However, there is a small, yet very significant challenge we face with every one of our projects, before the work even begins: understanding glass.

The one constant issue is understanding different types of glass and their unique properties. Not all glass will work on all projects. We know this, but educating customers on types of glass and why they need certain glasses for a specific project is something we run into daily.  

On top of that, you have to consider glass processing—should the glass be tempered, have polished edges, hole or shape cutouts; does it need to be insulted or laminated, have an energy-efficient coating? All of these things can change how we go about creating the final piece depending on the process we are using.

To make it clear, here at Moon Shadow Glass, we walk through each project with each client.

 

  • Do you really need a low-E piece of glass for a transit windscreen? Probably not since it’s open on all sides.
  • You should jump up to low-iron glass if you’re going to do a full color direct printed job so you don’t get the greenish tint from standard clear glass.
  • If the final piece is capture on all sides you don’t really need polished edges. But if the edges are exposed, it probably is best to have polished or ground edges.
  • Hole placement on annealed glass can be quite different than hole placement on tempered glass. You might have to rework your design to fit those needs.

 

These are just the most common challenges we run into, but there are many more and it all varies from project to project. It makes our job easier, and our customers’ happier when we take the time to walk through each customer’s needs and explain why small decisions can make a huge difference in the final product. 

Kris Iverson is marketing and creative director for Moon Shadow Glass. Contact him at 503/669-6154.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, July 25, 2016

Now that we have had a few days to let the PPG-Vitro deal sink in, I think the underrated item in this deal is that Vitro is not exactly a newbie when it comes to glass. They have been producing glass since 1909. So there’s history there for sure. I say this because the focus was on PPG getting out of glass after more than a century, and it may have been different if a young upstart company bought them. 

Another item that had people buzzing is what happens to the current PPG workforce. I can tell you that in a deal like this people are a crucial part of it. Vitro now inherits some serious talent and they surely will want to take advantage of that. Believe me, if they don’t, competitors will. On the branding side, I mentioned on a previous post that the tried and true names will be staying. That is a big move as we’ve seen acquisitions in the past where familiar names were blown out, and so were the specs that were attached to them for years. 

At this point, there will be a few months while the particulars get settled and the deal becomes official. We’ll keep an eye on it all, but I think for the most part we won’t see any dramatic change to the way business is done in our industry based on this. I do, however, see the logjam starting to loosen on other deals. While we are in a serious rumor overload right now, I do think more action is coming in the second half of this year. And there are a few with potential to be bigger than this and also have an affect on the industry, too. Stay tuned.

Elsewhere…

  • Last note for now on the Vitro-PPG deal and it’s an angle I bring up with all major deals: will the new entity still support the industry the way the old did? PPG is at every show and always willing to help. In addition, their education pieces are fantastic. Hope that continues!
  • Another note from the acquisition side, I’m surprised that the Dow and Dupont deal has not had more coverage. A lot of speculation there on what comes next specifically regarding Dow Corning. Will bear watching as well.
  • The monthly release of the Architectural Billings Index hit right as all of this came up. So it flew under the radar some. June marked the fifth straight positive month though the score trended down a bit to 52.6 from May’s 53.1. New projects also fell some to 58.6 after a scorching 60.1 in May. Basically this along with some other forecasting metrics keeps the industry on pace for a positive start to 2017.
  • Via the Twitter feed of Ted Bleecker, a great column on the economy and the metrics with it. So while I trumpet the above success of the ABI, I guess I too may be falling into that trap. Good food for thought here. And the author of this piece, Alex Carrick, is also a good Twitter follow.
  • Last this week, one convention done, one to go. Stepping away from the actual event and looking at the costs, these two events will tally more than 140 million to put on. That number just blows my mind. Yes, it’s helpful for the economy: that 140 million goes to tons of trades and companies involved with it. But it also just seems like an insane waste of resources. And my misery will just grow worse with a BILLION dollars expected to be spent on the election in November. 

 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

A rumor had been floating out there for a while about two major glass companies. In fact rumors surrounding both companies are almost like a cottage industry. Now the “rumor” has hit the main stream news. I am talking about PPG and Vitro—more specifically, about PPG selling its flat glass division to Vitro. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette acquired an independent auditors report and then released a story late last Friday night. Obviously this does not mean a sale is imminent. We don’t know exactly what sort of report it was, as the story doesn’t dig into specifics. But the fact the Post-Gazette ran with this story is very interesting. It now brings this backroom discussion to the public. We’ll see if this marriage happens or if something else swerves in its way. In any case this will be one to watch.

Elsewhere…

  • We are halfway through the year, so let’s do some looking back and some peering ahead. 2016 got underway with some early weather issues and dropping oil prices. Both of those items were especially unkind to the great state of Texas. Bird friendly glazing continued to be in the news and growing in the minds of designers, building owners and consumers. Hopefully it will find more usage as well. Also in the first half of the year, another successful industry gathering at BEC, ending an incredible run of success by Jon Kimberlain of Dow Corning in the lead of that event. From an overall economic side, both residential and nonresidential starts and put-in-place are running ahead of forecasts and the analysts are bullish. The ABI and DMI also looked solid during Q1 and 2.

    Now looking ahead, will oil prices stay low or start to grow? The bi-annual glasstec in Germany hits in September, and I’ll be curious on where the vibe is there, especially given the whole “Brexit” adventure in play. GlassBuild America goes a month later than usual this year and is bigger than ever, with bigger floor space, more exhibitors, and tremendous innovation and networking to be had. That’s in October. I still expect other acquisition news to hit (aside from mentioned above), though being a major sellers’ market, there may be some delay in any of that happening with valuations a lot higher than folks would like to pay. Of course, no looking ahead can happen without the one thing that most likely will be life changing. The 2016 Presidential election. No words can probably describe that one accurately. Anyway it should be an interesting run to 2016. Buckle up! 
  • Speaking of GlassBuild, just a reminder about the Glazing Executives Forum. Two great keynotes (George Hedley and Ken Simonson) and “Solution Sessions” are lined up that will be well worth your time. Learn more and join the growing registration list. 
  • The winners of the Glass Magazine photo contest are out, and I loved the winner—a picture of glass after going through a two hour fire test. It's just an awesome shot overall. This contest was a fun one, and I expect it grow and be even better in the future. Our industry has a ton of great looking and innovative pieces. Let’s keep pounding our chests and show it off!  
  • I’m a bit late on this, but congrats to Bobby Hartong and his family, his partner and my brother Steve, and everyone at WA Wilson in West Virginia on their 175th Anniversary! Yes, 175 years. It's an amazing accomplishment and could not have happened to nicer folks too. That party in 25 years for the 200th will be a wild one. 
  • If you have the slightest interest in the growing 3D printing world, this link is for you. A ton of great insight and resources in one place thanks to Benesch Law and my good pal and industry supporter Rick Kalson. 
  • Last this week, here is an interesting article on the Las Vegas building market and how the tall residential towers are not in the future plans. I wonder if this same fate awaits Toronto? Eventually there’s just too much.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Material selections and light play an important role in architectural design. These elements are essential to making a human connection to our built environments, helping to shape our emotional wellbeing. With the generation of progressive ideas for new uses of materials, an entire space can be transformed.

Art glass can do this in many ways. It can allow us to experience the exterior and interior in tandem, while various lighting conditions can change the perceived experience of the glass and its reflection on the space around us, and it’s a material that gives a look of luxury with its glimmering surfaces and depth that no other material can offer.

The possibilities with art glass are endless. Enhance a storefront window, create a curtain wall for your business or loft, add vibrancy to your residential windows, or simply make a statement with the boldness of a fine art piece.

Aside from all the creative reasons to utilize art glass in your project, there are practical reasons, too. Utilizing art glass is an easy-to-maintain option to enhance your space. Art glass is a strong, safe and energy-efficient way to personalize your space and create a sense of identity and style.

  1. Art glass provides a sense of place that is unique. 
  2. For a business or institution, art glass conveys a permanent grounded and established expressive presence rather than a temporary fleeting existence. 
  3. Art glass can be a beacon or landmark identity. 
  4. Along with being non-toxic like all glass, art glass can be specified to contribute to gaining LEED points, including Platinum designation. 
  5. Glass artwork can be designed and specified to meet safety codes.

 

Nancy Gong is owner and director of Gong Glass Works, an art studio that focuses on the design and fabrication of contemporary architectural art glass. Gong serves on the Board for the American Glass Guild, is AGG’s 2017 Conference and Program Chair, is a member of the Glass Art Society and Stained Glass Association of America, and an Allied Member of the American Institute of Architects Rochester. She can be reached at Nancy@nancygong.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Do you see value in professional development? Most people would answer yes, but how many would follow through? During the housing downturn, many expenses that didn't directly correlate to a revenue line item were put on hold. However, the industry is now doing better than it has in many, many years. So, how do you stand out from the competition to ensure you're at the top of your customers' lists?

According to the latest AAMA market study, the U.S. total non-residential vision area in 2015 increased 5 percent compared to 2014 and 10 percent compared to 2013. The excuse of lean times is over. Those who invest in their employees, invest in their business overall. Knowledge is king! When customers ask a question, they want to know they can count on you for an immediate, accurate answer.

Even Congress sees the value of education. The House Education and the Workforce Committee has introduced draft Perkins Reauthorization legislation and is expected to debate, mark up and vote on that legislation before the House adjourns in mid-July. Let's all pause here. Our government is acknowledging a gap. If both sides of Congress can come together on the issue of education, surely we can all agree that it is one worthy of action.

The conversation below from Joe Erb's blog on investing in professional development sums up how our industry should view education. 

CFO asks CEO: What happens if we invest in developing our people and they leave?

CEO: What happens if we don't, and they stay?

Joe certainly put words into action by becoming one of the first FenestrationAssociate certified professionals, acknowledging that knowledge is power. In a highly competitive market with well-educated customers, it’s important for industry professionals to maintain a broad knowledge base. I challenge you to evaluate how to strategically strive toward professional development. The effects on your culture and customers will be worth the investment.

Angela Dickson is marketing manager for AAMA. Contact her at adickson@aamanet.org

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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