Max Perilstein's blog

We can debate the merits of programs like LEED until we’re all blue in the face. The bottom line, though, is the performance and sustainability of the building when all is said and done. And while the various green rating systems are pivoting and making efforts to evolve their programs into ensuring long-range success, there’s one process that guarantees it: the Net Zero building.

Slowly but surely Net Zero is taking off. It's important in the glass industry, because the process rewards the glass/glazing performance and basically will force those pesky HVAC guys to size their efforts correctly. Too many times we get blamed (unfairly I must add) for the oversizing of HVAC units because there’s no trust in fenestration. With Net Zero, we’re all working together and the playing field does level. There’s a ton to this process, and it's still pretty raw, but I do believe it will be in the mainstream sooner than many think.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of sustainability, one of the great champions of the effort in our industry is Mark Silverberg of Technoform. Last week he was named to the AAMA Sustainability Steering Committee. Can’t get a better man than that to be a force in the effort!
  • The energy of the trade show/industry conference is the hottest in years. So far 2014 is showing a major uptick in attendance and excitement. A couple more regional shows are coming up to be aware of. The 27th Annual Mid Atlantic Glass Expo hits April 30th in Greenbelt, Md.  Then in Canada, the Canadian Glass Association's Glass Connections conference in Nova Scotia (would love to go, birthplace of the great Sidney Crosby) comes through on June 4-5. Both events will provide excellent learning and networking potential. And don’t forget about the granddaddy of them all, the biggest show in all of North America: GlassBuild America, in September in Vegas. That floor is filling up nicely, and it will be an incredible event not to be missed.
  • After a hiatus in doing interviews on the blog, we welcome that segment back. One area of the business that I am always fascinated by is switchable glass, specifically  liquid crystal and suspended particle products. These products are growing in usage thanks to the boom on the decorative glass side. It’s surely moving up from the “niche” category. So it was great to catch up with Anthony Branscum, director of architectural sales at Innovative Glass Corp. in New York, and talk with him about the growth of the product, some of misconceptions out there and more.

MP: What do you think is driving this positive direction and usage?

Anthony Branscum: I think it’s mainly because the products have come a long way and are now beyond the “Proof of Concept” stage. Architects around the country, and the world for that matter, are realizing the practical benefits of using these products in their designs. Perhaps more importantly, they have gained confidence that the technology will last when it gets out there. They have become educated consumers. 

MP: Speaking specifically on the liquid crystal product, there’s been talk recently in different circles about uneven performance and products failing. Do you think such talk is legitimate or is it being overblown?
 

AB: I have heard and read some of the same things you are alluding to. There’s a lot of posturing going on within the industry right now. Some suppliers of switchable glass are spending a lot of time bashing their competitors instead of talking about their own virtues. They believe it makes their product appear as if it’s “the best”, but what they’re really doing is hurting the industry at large. They’re creating a perception out there that the product won’t last.  It is simply not true.  When fabricated properly, one can expect many years of service from liquid crystal technology. Of course, there are companies that don’t produce a great product, but they are not the majority, and time will eventually run out on them.

MP: What should buyers do or look for to make sure they are dealing with the right people?

AB: They should make sure whoever they are dealing with can provide them a functioning sample. They should ask for a copy of the warranty. They should definitely ask for references and perhaps ask to see a job local to them where the glass has successfully been installed. If the vendor can’t satisfy these requests in a timely fashion, they should think twice about going too far with them. 

MP: You and your company have been in the switchable space for more than a decade. What are some of the biggest changes you have seen with the product offerings?

AB: The biggest change has been the advancement in the clarity of the LC films when they are in their clear state. The industry has come a long way in achieving better clarity. The second notable advancement would be the film widths. The product is available in wider widths than ever before. This helps satisfy most of the common architectural sizes we come across.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Every year, one or two of the most important events in our industry are held in Las Vegas. (Remember: GlassBuild America-October-Vegas). It’s important because so much of our product is used there, and in a lot of cases, its higher end using more sophisticated materials. With that in mind, I keep tabs on that city and this week I ran into news about discussions happening there to get a light rail system and expand the monorail. If either happens, it could make getting around the area easier and more efficient. Especially the long-promised light rail from the airport to the strip. As someone who has waited in crazy cab lines at the airport, the ability to possibly cut that out would be very welcomed. All of this is still in planning stages, but it bears watching. These changes don’t have a direct effect on our industry, but the more work that happens in Vegas, no matter the style, usually the better for us.

Elsewhere…

Lots of links with education and insight this week…

 

  • For those of you who have to use Google to advertise, the changes they recently made are a new challenge to getting the word out. Good rundown over at Window and Door by Welton Hong here. Also check out the poll. I am stunned at the results where half of the respondents do not use Google for advertising. Why stunned? Because the audience of that blog is made up of window folks and while many are manufacturers, many also are dealers. And if you are selling to the public and not in Google, you are missing out. 
  • While you are out reading different links, I suggest checking out the latest from John Wheaton. Really good piece on the back and forth that goes on in getting a customer. All of us have been there--on one side or another--I enjoyed the way John wrote it, made me feel like a fly on the wall in the room as the conversations took place. 
  • Speaking of blogs, when I first read this one from Ron Crowl, I e-mailed to tell him how much I liked it. The takeaway is excellent and I am sure to share this with my kids as well; good life lesson. 
  • I do enjoy PPG’s Glass Education Center. Tremendous resource. I was on the “Top Design Considerations” page and it was a great primer. I especially love that they listed “Safety” first. That is so huge and something we all as an industry have to keep pounding on, in every aspect of the business. Safety has to come first! Anyway, great info overall throughout that site. 
  • Last this week, fantastic read on the architectural design of Prince’s home and headquarters in Minnesota. So not only was Prince a legend from an entertainment standpoint, he also did some cutting edge things from an architectural angle. Also, I have to guess with so many great industry players in the state of Minnesota, someone reading this blog had to have worked on this project. If you did, let me know. I would love to hear your experience. 

 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

This past week we had two major construction-related indexes release reports that featured some interesting takeaways. First from the general contractor level, the results were not very rosy and somewhat surprising. The Associated Builders and Contractors Construction Confidence Index is a study/survey that takes six months into account and looks at the business in a few different areas: Sales, Profit Margin and Staffing. In the latest CCI, tracking the last six months of 2015, all three indicators were down. I can see staffing as a challenge, but I have to admit that Sales and Profit being off is a shock. And those of you dealing with GCs each day probably agree. Now the numbers are obviously much better than they were in 2012, but still interesting to see that the end of 2015 was not a major success for this side of the world, at least according to the index.  

Meanwhile the monthly Architectural Billings Index was released and it ticked up again coming in at 51.9. New project inquiries were down slightly, but they are still in a very healthy territory and regionally only the Midwest did not crack the break-even mark of 50, finishing slightly under at 49.8. So overall the ABI continues to be a source of positivity as we keep our eyes glued to 2017. Second quarter usually sees a boost in new project inquiries, so we’ll see if that indicator starts moving that way or not.

Elsewhere…

  • Environmental Product Declarations is an area I am admittedly weak on. So I have been trying to educate myself and I came across this excellent article that provided solid insight. 
  • If you somehow missed the great blog post by Kris Iverson on last week’s e-glass weekly, here’s the link. Hiring is so incredibly hard; so any additional help is always appreciated.
  • Via Facebook I saw the news on changes at Vos Glass in Western Michigan. Vos is one of those very respected brands and I am a big fan of Linda Vos-Graham who ran the company until now with a new team taking over. I hope Linda is able to stay involved (if she wants) in the industry. Her smarts and perspective were huge parts of events like the Glazing Executives Forum.
  • We are about a month from the next event that many in the industry will participate in one way or another. The 2016 AIA show is in Philadelphia this year and given its location and timing (better in May than in June), I have a feeling it could be very busy. The fact it’s busy is not usually a guarantee for the exhibitors of a good show though since the event is so vast and education is still the priority, but the potential is there. 
  • Last this week, Prince passed away. I’m a fan, have listened to his music for years.  What I did not expect was how many people were HUGE fans and the outpouring of love and respect for him. It was Michael Jackson-like, including wall-to-wall coverage on the cable news channels. Tough run for music superstars with David Bowie and now Prince passing away in such a short time.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

From time to time I hit some personal items on this blog. The start of this post will be one of them, so if you are here for the industry-related scuttlebutt, please skip down to the next section. Otherwise, thank you for hearing me out. Fifteen years ago this past week, my father passed away. He was a great and patient man. An inspiration in that he decided to “bet on himself” and start anew, by breaking away and starting his own glass business in the 70s. Not exactly the greatest economy to do so, but he did and did it well. He recognized the talent of people around him and put them in a position to succeed. Efforts by my brother, sister and many others who were there at the start were huge and the company grew. That team he built, led to more and more over the years as people connected to that original network branched out and now the impact from that foundation is felt throughout the industry today. That makes me proud. I was too young to be in that business at the start, but I consider myself one of the branches of that tree though. I wish he could still be here to see how we all are doing, but that was not meant to be. In any case, I do think about him all the time and miss him dearly. He may be gone, but never forgotten.

Elsewhere…

  • Nice pub for the industry and SageGlass with a quick Q&A in the New York Times in the Vocations section. 
  • Very interesting article here on a 1,600-year-old glass kiln discovered in Israel. The best part of it for me was that they mention how even back in ancient times there were cost differences for glass based on supplier. The price lists were on stone tablets… amazing. 
  • A great Twitter follow is Glassworks Inc. (@Glassworks_Inc) as there’s usually an excellent article or picture to take in. This past week was no exception with a super link to an article on “Architectural Embellishment,” and that story was spot on. For the architect the question is: you have the freedom to design whatever you want, but should you? 
  • I got the new Glass Magazine this week and kudos again to Katy Devlin and company for a fantastic issue. Tremendous reads cover to cover and the list of top fabricators never disappoints. In addition, the piece on interiors was very informative. A lot more to think about with that application than I think many expect.   And the continuation on “Exit Planning & Succession” series was strong. Good stuff.
  • And in that issue, my “ad of the month” award goes to Dorma. I liked the layout of their piece, very sharp and eye catching. Right amount of text and thumbnails of product really worked here.
  • Last this week, the NHL playoffs kicked off, as did the NBA. So here are my picks in both. Again, apologies to the fan bases I choose, as I am rarely right…  In the NHL I am taking the San Jose Sharks to beat the New York Rangers. Yes, I know picking the Rangers means I am picking against my Penguins…. In the NBA, this year will be amazing to watch. I am excited that my Detroit Pistons are back in the post-season for the first time in years, but they have no chance, unless they convince Guardian’s Chris Dolan to come out of retirement and rain down lots of three pointers on the Cavs. I don't  think LeBron can guard Megatron Dolan. I would love to see the Spurs win because of my friends in San Antonio, the awesome Luna family. But I think it’s the Warriors world and while they will be tested, in the end, I think they pull it off in a finals rematch vs. the Cavs.

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

If you read my blog with any regularity you know one of my favorite things to do is recognize the quality people in our industry. So when a company makes a move to promote super people like what happened this week, it’s even better to talk about. YKK announced promotions to Oliver Stepe and Mike Turner and I am thrilled for them. Both are excellent guys, talented to the core, and have a commitment to the industry. That last part means a lot to me personally. This industry is made better thanks to efforts of people like Oliver and Mike and they represent us very well. Congrats guys, the recognition is truly much deserved!

Elsewhere…

  • I am thrilled that I will be attending glasstec in Germany this fall.  Especially now that I have done the show once, I feel like I have a better appreciation for the enormity of it.  To make it even better, glasstec announced its focus this week, “Glass Industry 4.0,” with a heavy emphasis on technology. I simply can’t wait to see what that is all about, learn, and grow. The 3+ weeks that feature glasstec and GlassBuild America surely will be exhilarating and exhausting, but oh, so good! 
  • The architectural community is in mourning after the loss of Zaha Hadid. She was an absolute legend in that world and her passing have hit many hard. Her designs will surely be her legacy. There was an excellent remembrance in the New York Times by one of her employees Tegan Bukowski, capturing the qualities that made Ms. Hadid the incredible architect she was. 
  • Looking at the initial designs of the redevelopment of the Inglewood, California site where the St. Louis Rams are re-locating looks very ambitious. If this concept can become reality it surely will be a place to see. I am guessing that a lot will change before ground gets moved, but if it comes off the way this article shows, sign me up for a visit! 
  • Twitter reminder: if you are a on the service and not following John Wheaton (@JohnLWheaton1) you need to do so. He always provides interesting insight and on occasion good project questions and quizzes including one this past week. The last one he did I had no clue on, so it was fun to sit back and watch him converse with another excellent Twitter follow (Garett Henson @Viracon_Garret) on the details. In the end I learned, which is a benefit of good follows on social media.
  • Do you ever wonder what will happen to your online profile when you pass away? Right now, it looks like nothing. Long, but semi-interesting article here on the situation, specifically on Facebook. Personally I see it on LinkedIn and Twitter a lot and no doubt it throws you when someone who has passed comes up in your feed or as a recommended follow. 
  • Programming note: no blog post next week. I will be back in this space the week of April 18th unless news breaks ahead that. 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Last week I wrote about a window job in Hawaii that I had significant concerns about. I was thrilled to hear from many people with additional thoughts on the project and I wanted to cover a few of them this week as a follow up. 

First off, I was told that the windows were not floor to ceiling. They are floor level but only go up 30 inches. So that obviously makes a difference in the scenario of an adult walking through it. Even with that I am still not a fan of the design and still don’t believe it’s logical. The opening still can be very dangerous for a child or a pet. How that’s not a bigger issue is surprising to me. Plus, as I mentioned last week, not having a safety screen makes it an opening for debris to fall and cause damage on the street below. I guess this make up is common, though it really makes no sense to me. If you want fresh air, it seems to me that there’s got to be other ways. The other avenue that a few brought up was energy loss. That’s a healthy opening to allow air in: how does this effect the energy usage? I am not sure. I’d assume the climate in Hawaii may be OK for this as the AC may not need to run at night if you can get air flow from the window openings. Anyway, it’s been a fascinating ride and I’ll continue to monitor.

Elsewhere…

  • The Architectural Billings Index popped back into positive territory for February. I had a feeling that was going to be the case. The real positive takeaway was that the AIA feels March and April will be strong, so here’s the thing to watch: most expect 2016 to be a good year. The put-in-place spend is already there. 2017 is something we just don’t know. This forecast (because it hits our industry a year out) is one of those indicators that could give us a clue, so the next few months are important in relation to the start of the 2017 cycle. 
  • If you have not seen the incredible video from Guardian Industries on how float glass is made, do yourself a favor and check it out. Well done, and a great tool for showing those in the industry who have never been to a float how it works. Kudos to the team at Guardian responsible for this one! 
  • Time is running out for you to get your nominations in for the prestigious Glass Magazine Awards. April 8 is the cutoff. So many great projects and products in our industry; I love this stuff! 
  • Time for another list. Forbes did a rundown of the Top 10 most traffic-clogged cities, so I know I have had this subject before because it always intrigues me. This one is missing a doozy location in my opinion... Here’s the countdown.

10. Honolulu: Wow I may move HQ of this blog to Hawaii since that area keeps coming up! You know, to be closer to the news and action, of course!

9. Atlanta: It’s bad, but not top 10 bad for me. Those who live there may disagree

8. Chicago: Absolutely brutal.

7. Boston: When it rains, this is top 3.

6. Seattle: Traffic is a mess because of the layout of the city.

5. New York City: Is this true or reputation?

4. Houston: Been there, taken side streets to avoid the backups, only to be more miserable.

3. San Francisco: All of the public transport doesn’t help?

2. Washington, D.C.: No question, deserved.

1. Los Angeles: Is this like NYC? Reputation over reality?

Who’s missing? Dallas/Ft. Worth. That is a top 5 traffic nightmare city for me. Between construction and rush hour and those crazy GPS-destroying on and off ramps, how this is not in the top 10 is amazing to me.

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Hawaii is experiencing a building boom and with it comes adventures. One such issue popped on my radar this week with an almost-completed residential skyscraper using a window in an application that, to me, is downright scary. At the Ritz Carlton Residences on Waikiki Beach, the windows go floor to ceiling, but they project out (window opens out, not up) at the bottom (floor level) at least 4 inches. That may seem harmless in print, but looking at it in reality makes no sense at all (just check out the picture). The opening is surely large enough for almost anything to fall through and be a dangerous projectile for those on the ground. In fact, at least one cell phone has already fallen through. 

But the bigger safety issue to me is the human factor. While a child or an adult can’t fall through a 4-inch opening, the fact that the window opens outward momentum from a human can potentially push them right through. It's amazingm but this design meets code because there is a 3-inch lip at the floor in front of the window. Because it meets code, the city planners say their hands are tied. Thankfully there’s now a push locally from home inspectors (props to Wayne Blackburn of Inspect Homes for leading the charge) and others to get this issue addressed. For me it’s a common sense thing: I just can’t grasp why a designer would choose this style of window for this application and why no one is thinking of the liability that will certainly come. I am not a big window guy; maybe this design is common, but I’ve never seen it in an application like this. I’ll keep following the process, as this structure is due to officially open in April. 

Elsewhere…

  • Great news on an honor being bestowed on one of the best our industry has. Julie Schimmelpenningh of Eastman is receiving the Award of Merit from ASTM International. This is the highest award an individual can get, and it so deserved. The time, effort and care Julie puts into representing her company and our industry is incredible. It is awesome she is being recognized for those efforts. Congrats, Julie!
  • One of the commercials during March Madness basketball was for a business insurance company called CinFin, also known as Cincinnati Financial. The commercial featured a glass facility--looked like a fabricator actually. So who was it? Which company got featured? If it’s you, don’t be shy and let me know. And way to go on getting featured in the commercial; hopefully you got a break on rates.
  • Really excited about the news on the expansion of GlassBuild America. I really love that things are progressing in our industry so well that the show can grow. The event this year is later than normal, October 19-21 in Las Vegas, and it will be the perfect place and time to wind down 2016 and budget, prep, and plan for 2017. Can’t wait. 
  • Last this week, would you hire a photographer for your vacation as noted in this story? It’s becoming a bit of trend where people are hiring professionals to document everything on their trips. The reason I find this at all interesting is in the digital and smart phone era, picture taking has taken off, and everyone thinks they’re a pro now. I guess not “everyone” is after all.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

A lot of things drive me crazy. Those of you who know me, know that I surely have my quirks. One thing that gets me going is when I see an empty building or strip mall, with a brand new structure being built on the site right next to it or in front of it. It’s insane when we build new commercial spots when we have empty or underused ones in virtually the same place. So I was quite pleased this week when I saw the story of shoe and clothing company Under Armour remodeling an old Sam’s Club building into a major office space for themselves. This article should be shared with city and municipal planners everywhere. Before you approve that new retail structure 500 feet away from a perfectly good unused one, think about how great this turned out. I know people prefer “new,” but we as a society really need to improve the existing for many reasons.

Elsewhere…

 

  • Good news on the Dodge Momentum Index with a positive gain in February. The next release of the other metric I follow regularly, the Architectural Billings Index is set for March 23.
  • The e-mail virus scams are continuing to plague consumers and businesses and the latest one is having great success with its approach, so beware. The e-mail will come in and it will say something along the lines of “Invoice attached.” Since we are all usually on our toes with regards to bills, clicking that link or attachment is almost second nature. However these e-mails have become a carrier for a nasty computer virus. So if you are not used to getting invoices via e mail or do not recognize who is sending it to you, please do not open.
  • Congrats to my friend Devorah Serkin for her new gig at GGI. Devorah is an extremely talented person and it was a pleasure getting to work with her in her past life at Dip-Tech. She will do great things at GGI for sure. 
  • Just wanted to pass on congrats on a position I care a great deal about: the chair of GANA BEC. Jon Kimberlain of Dow Corning has completed his term and he did a fantastic job. I have noted Jon’s impact here previously and that surely will not be forgotten. Stepping in as the new Chair is Gus Trupiano of AGC. This is an excellent selection for the role. Gus is a tremendous man who will bring a new voice and vision to the position and keep the division & industry moving forward. This is excellent news for all who are involved in that world!
  • Last this week, I am so pumped the best show on TV returns this week: “The Americans” is back and I simply can’t wait. Awesome stuff. If you have not caught the show, start from the beginning. It truly is a treasure, and if you do watch it, buckle in; I have a feeling this is going to be a very interesting year!

 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

One of the subjects that came up at the GANA Annual Conference last week was bird-friendly glazing. I have mentioned that effort here a few times and recently I had the opportunity to talk with a few people very connected to that world, specifically the folks involved in getting an ASTM standard created for testing. It’s been an extremely interesting learning experience for me as I knew about the products but had little idea on how the testing worked. I was able to ask a few questions to the co-chair of this ASTM committee working on this standard, Dr. Christine Sheppard of the American Bird Conservancy, to get some insight on the process.

Max: How far along is the ASTM committee so far in this effort to develop the standard and what are some of the challenges?

Dr. Sheppard: We have a great committee, and a large one, with experts from diverse parts of the glass industry, as well as architects, ornithologists and conservation biologists. We posted a first draft of the protocol and got a lot of good comments. Stefan Knust, my co-chair, has just posted the protocol, summaries of the comments and other materials, in preparation for scheduling our first conference call.

The most obvious challenge for this process is that ASTM has never had a protocol that includes live animals before. So we have to figure out what needs to be explained and what doesn’t. For example, our test involves working with specialists who safely net, handle and monitor the songbirds we fly in the tunnel.

Max: Is there anything that stands out for you with the (current glass industry) efforts or is there a long way to go? For me it just feels like more and more people are understanding the issue and respecting it- determined to help with solutions than a few years ago for sure. So I am curious if you are seeing that from your position in this process.

Dr. Sheppard: I think I’m seeing exactly what you are (and I think ABC has had a lot to do with it). There is an increasing awareness of the issue that is leading to change. There is still a long way to go – the glass that’s already out there is killing a billion birds a year –  but you don’t have to give up glass to save birds – you simply have to think about birds early in the design phase. Enough buildings have been constructed and remediated to show that considering birds doesn’t impede creativity, impair function or bust budgets.

Thank you Dr. Sheppard for your time as well as the all of the people on the committee including folks like Urmilla Jokhu-Sowell of GANA, Sylvain Denis of Walker Glass, and Dr. Neil McSporran of Pilkington for doing what you are doing here.

Elsewhere…

  • Some additional notes on Glass Magazine's WorldofGlassMap.com excitement I mentioned last week. I forgot to note with the physical edition of the magazine includes an actual full-sized map, showing the world of glass. That was awesome. I always loved when Glass Magazine did the maps in the past, so to see this feature return, I was pretty pumped. 
  • Also the ad of the month from that issue: The winner is the folks at Intermac. Loved the ad for their water jet style cutter (they had a great focused shot of the machine in action with the water splashing out). Very, very eye catching and sharp. Well done, folks. And overall, a lot of excellent ads this month. The creativity is flowing for many right now!
  • Last this week, a congrats to Alissa Schmidt of Viracon. She picked up an award from the Owatonna Business Women Group as the winner of the 2016 Young Careerist. Very cool recognition for Alissa, Viracon, and our industry, as so many times younger people don’t believe there’s a great career in the glass industry. But the opportunities are out there and I am thrilled that it’s being noticed!

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Over the last two weeks, the National Glass Association and Glass Magazine launched an amazing resource, one that I think is a must to have bookmarked for future use, especially considering the adventures of supply. The very slick website www.worldofglassmap.com can continue to help with the information and communication flow in our industry. I advise you if you have not checked it out to do so and consider a subscription to stay fully up to date. Congrats to the folks at NGA and Glass Magazine on this excellent proactive piece. 

Elsewhere…

  • Monitoring the Architectural Billings Index as always: the latest scores for January were slightly off coming in at 49.6. (50 is the break even). New product inquiries also were down from December. The good news was a nice bounce out of the northeast, and the fact that January historically has had softer numbers. I am not worried on 2016 at all at this point and will be watching the February totals on both the ABI and the Dodge Momentum Index for any signs of true weakness.
  • Speaking of 2016, Glass Magazine had a great article in the most recent edition on the potential growth in our industry. 
  • Actually that entire issue of Glass Magazine is loaded. Great articles on:

The energy code adventures in Florida

Structural Glass (which is a VERY hot product area right now)

Tips to avoid labor shortage issues- which obviously is a major deal in our world these day.

Next week I’ll hit you with my favorite ad from that issue as well…

  • I have written a few times about the difficulty our industry has finding project managers. I do think I have another position that can rival that: CAD Technician. Looking on various job boards and the need for CAD people both in our industry and out is really mind blowing. On that note, it is good to see many high schools (including where my kids attend) offering 4 years of CAD classes as this surely looks like an area the world needs. Maybe we can get schools to offer glass and glazing project management to help on that problem, too!
  • More industry meetings this week with IGMA and GANA having technical conferences in California. I am unable to attend, but will follow along online as much as possible. It’s at these conferences where much of the heavy lifting happens with regards to standards and guidelines in the glass and glazing industry. So keeping tabs on it is very important.
  • Last this week; I was reviewing a residential interior design site and looking at some of the projects that they felt were best in the past year. The one thing that stood out to me was the amount of glass that was used, specifically decorative glass used as countertops, wall cladding, and backsplashes. Decorative glass has been growing on the exterior quite a bit and being used in more and more commercial interior applications, but the residential application is looking like a very hot area and one where more and more glass can be used in place of other building products. 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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