Max Perilstein's blog

We can debate the merits of programs like LEED until we’re all blue in the face. The bottom line, though, is the performance and sustainability of the building when all is said and done. And while the various green rating systems are pivoting and making efforts to evolve their programs into ensuring long-range success, there’s one process that guarantees it: the Net Zero building.

Slowly but surely Net Zero is taking off. It's important in the glass industry, because the process rewards the glass/glazing performance and basically will force those pesky HVAC guys to size their efforts correctly. Too many times we get blamed (unfairly I must add) for the oversizing of HVAC units because there’s no trust in fenestration. With Net Zero, we’re all working together and the playing field does level. There’s a ton to this process, and it's still pretty raw, but I do believe it will be in the mainstream sooner than many think.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of sustainability, one of the great champions of the effort in our industry is Mark Silverberg of Technoform. Last week he was named to the AAMA Sustainability Steering Committee. Can’t get a better man than that to be a force in the effort!
  • The energy of the trade show/industry conference is the hottest in years. So far 2014 is showing a major uptick in attendance and excitement. A couple more regional shows are coming up to be aware of. The 27th Annual Mid Atlantic Glass Expo hits April 30th in Greenbelt, Md.  Then in Canada, the Canadian Glass Association's Glass Connections conference in Nova Scotia (would love to go, birthplace of the great Sidney Crosby) comes through on June 4-5. Both events will provide excellent learning and networking potential. And don’t forget about the granddaddy of them all, the biggest show in all of North America: GlassBuild America, in September in Vegas. That floor is filling up nicely, and it will be an incredible event not to be missed.
  • After a hiatus in doing interviews on the blog, we welcome that segment back. One area of the business that I am always fascinated by is switchable glass, specifically  liquid crystal and suspended particle products. These products are growing in usage thanks to the boom on the decorative glass side. It’s surely moving up from the “niche” category. So it was great to catch up with Anthony Branscum, director of architectural sales at Innovative Glass Corp. in New York, and talk with him about the growth of the product, some of misconceptions out there and more.

MP: What do you think is driving this positive direction and usage?

Anthony Branscum: I think it’s mainly because the products have come a long way and are now beyond the “Proof of Concept” stage. Architects around the country, and the world for that matter, are realizing the practical benefits of using these products in their designs. Perhaps more importantly, they have gained confidence that the technology will last when it gets out there. They have become educated consumers. 

MP: Speaking specifically on the liquid crystal product, there’s been talk recently in different circles about uneven performance and products failing. Do you think such talk is legitimate or is it being overblown?
 

AB: I have heard and read some of the same things you are alluding to. There’s a lot of posturing going on within the industry right now. Some suppliers of switchable glass are spending a lot of time bashing their competitors instead of talking about their own virtues. They believe it makes their product appear as if it’s “the best”, but what they’re really doing is hurting the industry at large. They’re creating a perception out there that the product won’t last.  It is simply not true.  When fabricated properly, one can expect many years of service from liquid crystal technology. Of course, there are companies that don’t produce a great product, but they are not the majority, and time will eventually run out on them.

MP: What should buyers do or look for to make sure they are dealing with the right people?

AB: They should make sure whoever they are dealing with can provide them a functioning sample. They should ask for a copy of the warranty. They should definitely ask for references and perhaps ask to see a job local to them where the glass has successfully been installed. If the vendor can’t satisfy these requests in a timely fashion, they should think twice about going too far with them. 

MP: You and your company have been in the switchable space for more than a decade. What are some of the biggest changes you have seen with the product offerings?

AB: The biggest change has been the advancement in the clarity of the LC films when they are in their clear state. The industry has come a long way in achieving better clarity. The second notable advancement would be the film widths. The product is available in wider widths than ever before. This helps satisfy most of the common architectural sizes we come across.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

This week a really interesting debate popped up over the usage of glass on the interiors of a new elementary school in Boulder, Colorado. The issue at hand was that the design is calling for a very open floor plan (which as we know is very popular these days in business structures), and some believe that would potentially put the children at extra risk if there were a school attack. I struggle with this on many levels. 

First, the protection of the children needs to happen from the exterior entrances. Once someone with evil intent enters any structure, any layout could be exploited. There have been great strides with exterior protective systems, specifically for schools (Childgard via Global Security Glazing is one I am familiar with), and more designers are laying out the entrances of schools with attacks in mind. Another issue is the “living in fear” factor. Shouldn’t we want the best possible educational environment for our children? So if this is it, then we should not penalize them by forcing the kids into thoughtless, boring shelter-like structures. If we want to keep them safe, we need to do it in other ways. The glass on the interior can be beefed up to offer extra protection, but obviously if someone gets through the doors and wants to do harm, nothing will stop them. Regardless, I hope this school moves forward and does what it needs to in meeting the educational and safety needs of its students. By the way, this story should give pause to the glass industry that our product is once again looked at as the weak link in the building. That, too, is not good.

Elsewhere…

  • A hearty congrats to old friend Scott Hoover after he signed on with Solaria as their vice president of Sales, Building Solutions for North America. I was not at all familiar with Solaria, but after digging into it I am excited for Scott and for what this company will bring to the industry space. As everyone who reads this knows I am a big supporter of advanced technology, so I’ll surely be rooting for success here. 
  • Speaking of things I have been hitting on, the North American Contractor Certification organization released a new Program Procedure Guide. This new document is helpful in understanding the process and requirements for this important industry program. Check it out. 
  • Fun visual of the week? Tweets from Brian Savage of Viracon. He tweeted the following pictures before a blizzard rolled in and then halfway through the blizzard: 

And you know those Minnesota people are tough, blizzard rolls in and they still work their entire shifts- no rushing home for them!

  • Friend of the blog and all-around good guy Joe Carlos of Triview Glass sent me a wild link. This story on a Burger King having all of its windows broken is one to check out. After I watched it, my thoughts were surely that a glass company needing some business was behind it!
  • Next week I’ll have my Super Bowl commercial thoughts. I am sure you can’t wait for that! 
  • Last this week, my favorite airport rankings brought a lot of discussion and other options. A major thank you to everyone who reached out via Twitter, comments, and e-mail. Some of the airports that came up in the various discussions:

Raleigh-Durham. I do like this airport, agree for a mid sized one its good.

Minnesota-St. Paul. A few hit me on this and it probably should be in the top discussion.  It’s gigantic but it does have tons of amenities/option and I totally forgot about that. 

Flint. Flown out of there many times- easy airport to work through, though food options are a bit light for me.

Portland, OR. For me it’s decent- nice open concourse but not top 5 worthy.

San Jose, CA. I have never been through there, I assume it has to be better than going through SFO or Oakland if you are going to that region.

John Wayne-Orange County, CA. Been awhile since I have flown through there.

Denver. I have never been a fan; to me it’s always cramped, and not great options.  Plus for some reason I always lose the rental car battle there- in the winter, all that’s ever available are rear wheel drive cars.  In the summer, giant SUVs. 

Hopefully I’ll hit some new and different airports this year and we’ll look at this again in 2017.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.
E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

I pride myself on always trying to learn something new each day. The Internet surely helps with that, as do friends and colleagues sending me notes and info to review. So when I ran upon a story talking about “Perovskite cells” and improved glass performance, I immediately jumped in. Evidently these are similar to photovoltaic cells that can harvest the sun's energy and turn it into electricity, but more efficiently and effectively. I have always been a proponent of doing all we can to maximize our space on the building to make glass more useful and intelligent, so this appears to be another source. However, like the past solar products, this looks like it's not exactly mainstream yet. Anyway, for my solar friends out there, if you have some insight on these cells and technology, please drop me a note. I’d love to learn more and also share here.

Elsewhere…

  • Once again, the latest edition of Glass Magazine is outstanding. Excellent article on trends in transport (crucial these days), as well as a good read on engaging the millennial workforce. Whole issue was super, though. Check it out!
  • My ad of the month in that issue was a tough call. Former winners like GGI and CRL came through again, but I like to notice folks here who have not gotten the credit yet. So with that in mind, this month the honor goes to Ergo Robotic Solutions. Jerry Nudi and company had what I feel was an eye-catching ad with a good memorable message. 
  • Since it was a very slow week in the glass and glazing world, this is the perfect time--as promised previously--to unveil my top five airports. I know several industry road warriors read this blog and so I’m curious if I hit all the right notes here. What I considered was: ease of getting around, food and bathroom options, places to sit and charge equipment, and just overall feel. I did not include security process because that can be a day-to-day adventure anymore. Also, this only includes airports I have visited. So someday when I get to visit the living-legend Lyle Shimazu and fly into Honolulu International, that could change things. So here goes…

#5. Boston-Logan. Yes maybe I am crazy with this one but I always had good experiences and think highly of this place.  Once I leave the airport and hit the roads and traffic, that’s another story…
#4. Madison, WI. There’s a lot of smaller airports that people seem to love.  Madison though is the best of that bunch.  Clean, bright, easy to get around, comfortable and creative seating. 
#3. Seattle, WA. This one probably depends on what terminal you fly out of.  The A/B sides are nice, with everything you can imagine and an amazing view through an incredible curtain wall.  The S terminal leaves you wanting.  But in the end the layout is simple and comfortable, plus the view is worth it.
#2. Detroit, MI. Sure it’s a homer pick.  I’m there as much as I am at my house some times, but as airports go this place is strong.  Easy layout.  Clean.  Tons of food choices including the always awesome Chick-fil-A.  Tons of seating and charging stations.
#1. San Diego, CA. Excellent layout, many food choices, clean and bright.  Nice people too.  Plus when you go there you are pumped that you are going to one of the nicer places in this world, and when you leave you are usually relaxed. 
Just missing the list: Charlottesville, VA (tiny airport but an outside deck to watch planes come and go is very cool) and Cincinnati, OH.

  • Last this week, it is Super Bowl time and despite my absolute dislike for NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, I will watch the game. Though at this point I enjoy the commercials more than the game. I really wanted New England to win it so Goodell would have to hand the trophy to Tom Brady, but that did not work out. So who wins the big game? I’m going with Carolina, so get ready Denver fans, a title is coming your way!

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.
E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Mother Nature flexed her muscles for the first time in 2016 with the massive snowstorm crushing a healthy portion of the eastern United States. Storms like these can sometimes have an effect on the economic performance of the industry depending on how long the event lasts and the cities it hits. We’ll see next month when the Architectural Billings Index and Dodge Momentum Index come out. Both metrics came in positive for the month of December, which was obviously good news. On the ABI, two main takeaways: first, the overall 2015 was pretty much equal with 2014’s performance, which should lock in a solid 2016 actual performance for the industry; second, the new projects inquiry number was very high, giving some confidence to the rosy predictions for 2017. But, that was all done before we had the correction to the stock market, so aside from seeing if there’s any storm-related declines, watching to see if positivity on the new project inquiry side will be key.

Elsewhere…

  • Another fear is the cratering cost of oil. If you read this blog (thank you), you know I usually mention gas prices—especially when they seem abnormally high or whenever prices get raised for the flimsiest reasons. (Like someone at a refinery having the flu!) However, we’re now on the opposite side of the spectrum with prices too low. Yes, it’s amazing to fill up so cheaply, but it’s actually economically unhealthy by a lot. So there’s got to be a happy medium, and for whatever reason we rarely can get to it.  By the way, I saw a graphic that really threw me: a bucket of chicken from KFC right now costs more than a barrel of oil. Never thought that comparison would ever happen!
  • Interesting move by PPG corporate as they are getting rid of voicemail systems. From an article in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review:

Instead of being prompted to leave a message when no one at PPG picks up, a recording informs callers that the person they are trying to reach is unavailable and that they should call back later or “try an alternative method to correspond.”

Wow. I'm at that point where I remember when voicemails were first introduced; now they are obsolete. Anyway, this new move is on the landline corporate office only as far as I know. And I have to assume those with cell phones will always have voicemail working.

  • From time to time when someone launches a new website or I come across one I have not previously seen, I mention it here. This time around, props to the folks at MyGlassTruck for their excellent upgraded site. I never thought you could make a glass rack truck look like a super model, but they did. Beautiful visual and informative site.  Congrats to Rustin Cassaway, Michael Frett and the team there for a job well done.
  • Very interesting story here on mold at the Winnipeg IGA Stadium. You read this and you seriously have to wonder if the designers had any idea where this stadium was going OR if they even knew what they were doing. Then again, you also wonder did the proper materials get value engineered out? In any case, just a baffling situation that won’t be easy to fix. 
  • Just a heads up, we are one month away from GANA BEC. Should be a good conference with some interesting speakers. For me, I look forward to hearing the “Innovation in the Industry” piece from Kai-Uwe Bergmann from BIG Architectural. Love that insight. Plus, baseball legend Johnny Bench is speaking, and being an old school sports guy, that should be neat.
  • Last this week, if you are an NBA fan and you have not had the opportunity to see Steph Curry of the Golden State Warriors in person yet, do yourself a favor and try and catch him. Truly an amazing player with the sweetest, and smoothest shot I have ever seen. 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Whenever someone new joins our industry I usually tell them that they are here for life. For whatever reason, glass and glazing has an amazing pull to keep folks around, albeit in different jobs for different companies, but still, same industry. Now there’s been some exceptions, incredible people like Tony Clark and Scott Surma were able to pull themselves away from this world and do extremely well in other industry realms. But in the end, the pull here is real. Why do I bring this up? Because an excellent blog post by Glass Magazine’s Bethany Stough was dead on. If you are not in this industry you care about the new or remodeled buildings differently. Basically when you are an outsider and that new store or doctor’s office opens, you are happy about the new options or the convenience. But when you are in this industry, you are focused on what glass did they choose, what metal system, who supplied it, who sourced it and more. Only those of us in the industry can understand the feeling and NEED to bend down in front of total strangers to look for a logo on tempered glass, or a spacer marking on an insulated storefront. So Bethany, great piece, welcome back (and CONGRATS!), and I’m pretty sure you are here in this industry for the long run.

Elsewhere…

  • The industry lost an absolute icon last week with the passing of Ed Berkowitz. Ed was a great person, class act and excellent businessman. His impact on the industry will always be felt because he positively influenced so many and his son Arthur has carried on the class approach that the Berkowitz family has had for generations. I count myself as fortunate to have been able to chat with Ed on a couple of occasions. He truly will be missed. Continued thoughts and condolences to his family, friends and company.
  • Pretty brutal week on the stock market and fears of a recession are out there. The initial feeling for many is this is part of a “correction” and things will settle. If you attended the Glazing Executive Forum at GlassBuild America this past fall you would’ve heard economist Jeff Dietrich talk about the coming corrective actions to the market. So at this point I am going with that… and I am making every effort to not look at the stock market numbers.
  • At this point, I am assuming no one in this industry won Powerball? For my fellow road warriors I felt like I had a moment almost as good as winning Powerball this week. I had an empty seat next to me on a long flight. That never happens… 
  • And speaking of flying, I was not aware that there’s now a new “class” of seats being sold. Welcome to “last class,” which will be a step below coach and really no frills. So the experience of flight is already difficult, tiring, frustrating, etc… and now we’ve somehow found a way to make it worse. Yikes. However I did find one article that made some points about how this could be a good thing… so there’s that. 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

The new year is off and running so it’s time for me to take a jump into the deep end and present to you my fearless predictions for 2016! This was a very difficult list to compile as things are more fluid in our industry than ever, and you have the frustrating stock market issues hanging out there, which could derail some positivity. But that said, here goes…

 

  1. Go Big or Go Home. This was always what I would call a mini trend. Architects have been known to desire to go as big as they can (opening wise) and for years they would push the envelope in North America as far as they could. Sometimes they would get what they want, sometimes not. Now that game is changing. Between the growth and push by folks like AGNORA and the recent oversize upgrades by Viracon, the approach of going bigger on sizes is a reality. Add in the foreign influence that always is willing and able to provide oversize material, and you have a full-fledged trend on your hands. 2016 will see a lot of this.
  2. Security Focused. No question we live in a scary world right now. I don’t think there’s ever been a time that we’ve all had to worry about security the way we have to now. Glass is a big part in the protection effort. Security glass is now more available than ever and being used in more applications than just federal buildings and high-risk areas. Schools are getting specific security-based glass applications and more and more businesses are choosing these options for their workers comfort and safety.
  3. Greenfielding is back and new players emerge. I think 2016 will see a few greenfield locations from established fabricators. There’s some very ripe markets that can use more fabricators and I have a feeling that you will see new plants pop up in 2016 with familiar names. Meanwhile, there’s quite a few players overseas looking to come to North America to set up shop, and I have a feeling they may choose to greenfield instead of buying someone established, though I am not totally convinced of that. But I do think you will see new players in North America in 2016 in one form or fashion.
  4. Codes and Certifications. I think the NACC takes off; it's too important for the industry not to. I also think individual certifications of installers also grow. We as an industry need to have that to show that we have the craftsmen and workmanship that is expected. On the code side, it’s been pretty quiet, so something tells me there’s going to be an issue coming up. It makes me think of a horror movie--just when things get really calm is when the monster jumps out with a chainsaw. Thankfully I am confident that folks like Dr. Tom Culp will be there to protect us…
  5. More focus on birds. Yes, I know this was on my 2015 list, but this is simply both a growth area and a meaningful process to protect wildlife. With more companies getting into the field, and more designers realizing what is happening, this grows in stature again. 

As always these are my opinions and thoughts and I always welcome yours, privately or publicly. So feel free to reach out.

Elsewhere…

  • Those of you who know me know I love lists and info. And I have to say that the infographics being put out by the folks at SaveOnEnergy.com are amazing. Here’s one they posted about EnergyStar, with who’s getting certified and where. It’s an incredible setup and worth your time.  
  • During the holidays, my family got me a FitBit. Really neat little apparatus that can tell me that I never sleep at night and need to take a ton more steps. But seriously though, it’s a cool piece and I am into it. But a question for any of you who got one recently: was it absolutely impossible for you to get it out of the packaging? I’ve never experienced anything like trying to get that thing loose. 
  • Last this week, the movie “13 Hours” comes out this coming Friday. The book was absolutely fantastic. Will Hollywood ruin the movie? I hope not, but I always get a feeling that it will happen. If the great Steven Spielberg can ruin a book (like he did with “Munich”), than it can happen anywhere.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Happy New Year, and welcome to 2016. It should be a very interesting year in both our industry and world with so much happening, including a Presidential election that looks to be like nothing we’ve ever seen before.

But before we move forward, it’s time to take a glance back at the predictions I made for 2015.

 

  •  Prediction: Instead of one big acquisition in our industry, I am predicting several smaller ones, maybe along the lines of five or six this year. I do think one sale will be someone who no one expected would sell.

    Result: I was half right. One sale no one would expect would surely be C.R. Laurence Co. to Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope. But the level of smaller sales did not happen. And, surely the CRL one was bigger than big.
  • Prediction: The “Bird Safe” revolution for glass will grow with more and more architects starting to ask for it.

    Result: Nailed it. It’s a growing area, and thanks to products that launched in this segment from Walker Glass and Pleotint Suntuitive, that process will continue.
  • Prediction: With North America now loaded with more digital printers for glass than ever, 2015 will be the year where its usage in several industry segments takes off.

    Result: The term “take off” was not accurate. The usage grew and did it at a solid pace, but not as off the charts as I expected. It’s still an area to monitor.
  • Prediction: At least two major companies return to participate heavily in GlassBuild America. With the show being a premier attraction, some companies who have skipped will realize they can’t miss it again.

    Result: The show was incredible, and the return of many impact companies and players to the floor and education was exciting. From what I can see, 2016 (in Las Vegas in October) will be even better.
  • Prediction: The glass shortage will have an effect, but the transportation issues will be even worse. These are items that the industry will have to be very creative and proactive to deal with.

    Result: Getting trucks was a challenge, and the companies who heeded the advice of being proactive and using communication had an easier time navigating a challenging landscape. These issues are not going away either.

 Overall: Not bad. Better than my football predictions… I’ll have my 2016 predictions next week!

Elsewhere…

  • We lost a good industry person and good man over the holidays. Tony Oliver passed away in December. I worked with Tony at Arch and he was a tremendous man. He was a sales guy, but surely not the typical one. Fun, unique, cool guy. Condolences to his friends and family.
  • I covered the Section 179 issue during the year. Before the end of the year, we got great news that the 179 deduction was officially raised to $500,000 and also made permanent. This is tremendous news for business and for many in our industry who supported this effort, especially David Dillmeier of Dillmeier Enterprises who brought this to my attention.
  • I assume many of you may flew somewhere during the holidays, and there are the road warriors in our industry that fly a lot. I think all of us can put together a list of best and worst airports. Recently such a list was created, and I can agree with some of the worst.

    Here are the bottom five:

 5- Northwest Regional Arkansas- Fayetteville- I have never flown in and out of here—the only one on this list I haven’t visited.

 4- O’Hare- Chicago- Absolutely. I try and avoid this airport with everything in my being.

 3- Dulles- Washington, D.C.- You know I’ve never had an issue here. It’s not a great airport but I think there’s many worse. Hope I didn’t jinx myself. I also may be biased since I love all the glass used here.

 2- LaGuardia- New York City- No question. It’s old; there’s nowhere to sit or eat; it’s expensive; and every flight is late.

 1- Newark Liberty- Newark, New Jersey- This is absolutely the right call in saying it’s the worst. Whether you are flying into or flying out of, your flight is never on time. Half of the place is usually out of order, and if you get stuck flying out of a terminal going through remodeling, enjoy that seat on the floor for three hours.

In the end I’m stunned LAX is not on this list. The same with Fort Lauderdale and Miami.

In a few weeks I am going to do my own rankings of “best” airports, and then put it out there to vote within the industry. I’m curious to see what other opinions are.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

 
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

The time has arrived to award the 2015 Industry MVP, and for the second year in a row, my choice happened to be involved in a billion dollar deal. Though this time the deal came before I named the winner, it’s nice to be associated with mega world changing events. This year’s recipient is a gentleman that I believe met every parameter that I had envisioned. He is extremely involved at the trade level, leading Glass Association of North America’s largest division and biggest event. He also sits on the board at North American Contractor Certification, the glazing certification effort that I believe is very important to the future of our industry. Our winner also has written some excellent educational articles and presented on some seriously large stages. His company is active in the industry, involved in the various shows and conferences.

With that said, our Industry MVP this year is Jon Kimberlain of Dow Corning

 To me, this is much deserved recognition of an excellent and dedicated industry player. Another key attribute? Jon is extremely likable. His personality allows him to deal with all styles of people, and as we know this industry surely runs the gamut on that.

Congratulations to Jon and to our runners up as well. I will say, every year as I do this process I find more and more amazing people, which makes this decision so much harder. But, it also excites me that we’ve got talent and skill to keep moving this industry forward.

Elsewhere…

  • The giant deal of Dow and DuPont hit this week and now we wait and see the effect it will have on our industry. The big part for us, in my opinion, is Dow Corning goes from being a 50/50 deal between Dow and Corning to a part of this deal. So, what happens then to the culture of the current company? As noted above, Dow Corning is a very active company in our world, and that changing would have a negative feel for sure. It’s a wait and see in this regard. Hopefully, like CRL showed, you can be a part of a major deal and still be active out there. Obviously the other thing to watch is the typical items in deals like this:  service, support and potential talent disruption. Does it get better, worse, stay the same? We’ll see…
  • Another good list to review, the Top Five Real Estate markets to watch in 2015, based on a report from the Urban Land Institute:

5. Atlanta. I am surprised given the amount of inventory I always assumed was out there. Evidently that must be getting snapped up, and growth is on the horizon.

4. Seattle. There’s lots of industry and growth here, and powerful corporations like Amazon and Microsoft, I am assuming.

3. Charlotte. Evidently this area is really bouncing back strong after all of the bank mergers and issues of the recession.

2. Austin. May be “weird,” but it is obviously a red-hot area to be in.

1. Dallas-Fort Worth. This area is rolling. The cost of living index is still on low side, and it’s a business friendly region. As we’ve seen in the glass industry with several players either opening and/or expanding there, it’s hot.

  • Last this week… This is the last post of 2015, unless of course something major happens. It’s been a wild year overall and one that absolutely just flew by. With my first post of 2016, I’ll look back at the year and the predictions I made for it. That should be fun. In the meantime, it is my sincere wish to all of you for the happiest of holiday seasons (Including the wrap up of Hanukah ending now) and a HEALTHY and prosperous new year! See you on the other side. Thanks for reading!

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

 
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

One of the areas of growth I have mentioned on occasion has been the interior space, spurred by the expansion of decorative options and the increased functionality of glass. But there are more reasons that this trend is hot. There’s an excellent article on GlassMagazine.com that spells it out very clearly. It breaks down the four areas of demand driving demand and it’s a must-read if you are looking at that side of the business.


Elsewhere…

  • There’s been some nervousness with regards to the economy and some reports that 2016 may be much softer than many expect. The analysts I follow and trust do not see this. The latest metrics show a lighter start in 2016, with a robust final two thirds of the year. Where the jury is suddenly out is 2017. Initiall,y the projections were good for that year as well, but some of that sentiment is changing within all models. However, everything is so far out and so much can change that it’s too soon to tell what we will have. Bottom line is we all still have to work hard and take advantage of what’s out there. I will continue to monitor, follow and mention here as time goes on. 
  • How hard are the questions in your job interviewing process? My guess is with how scarce labor is, the first question is “Do you have a pulse?” followed by “When can you start?” But in the world of Apple, it’s a whole different ballgame. I ran into this link that listed the 10 toughest job interview questions from Apple and it’s surely off the charts. 
  • I seriously can’t believe I have just one more blog post for 2015. Where has this year gone? Remember, next week’s post will unveil the industry MVP for this year. 
  • For my friends in Los Angeles who are connected to the happenings at LAX, is there any time frame for Terminal 6 to be completed on its remodel? What a disaster area that is and has been for awhile. 
  • I am huge “Rocky” fan so I went in with some bias, but I must tell you the movie “Creed” is absolutely fantastic. Even if you are not a Rocky fan or a boxing fan, the story line and performances in this are incredible. The fact there’s some talk about Oscar nominations for this film shows you it’s way beyond the traditional Rocky fare. I know there’s a ton of good movies coming out this month, but I’d add this to the list. 
  • Is there a better young, awesome singer than Adele? 
  • Last this week, one of our own in the industry needs our thoughts and prayers. Dan Funyak of PPG (also known as the husband of PPG’s awesome Joanne Funyak) will be out for a bit as he starts treatment for prostate cancer. It was caught early and it’s primed to be beaten. So, please keep Dan, Joanne and family in mind… and also per Dan (and many other experts) please keep this in mind: 

Guys 40 and over, please take the time to get your yearly physical and prostate screenings. This will give you the best chance to catch it early like Dan did. Women, please get your appropriate screenings and exams on a yearly basis. Give yourself the best chance if something is found.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

 
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

When I was a kid, I was always curious on how life would be in the year 2000. Would there be flying cars? Would we all be living like the Jetsons? Obviously that did not happen. But this week my futurist tendencies were tweaked again with a great article on what the construction industry could look like in 30 years. It’s a great piece featuring several excellent ideas that could be in place long before 2045. In fact many of the concepts listed are being developed right now, so it’s nice to see that there’s a finish line out there for it. I for one love the robot and lifting technologies. But I also think the reconfigurable rooms has potential. I would, however, be scared to death of the driverless trucks and heavy equipment, as I am not comfortable with anything “driverless” at this point. So check out the piece and dream…

Elsewhere…

  • For all of my technical experts out there, I have a question for you to look at. This comes from one of my loyal readers, and I just don’t have the knowledge for the insight needed. Here’s the deal:

    I have a question that may be nothing, but with the weather patterns this year water/leaks have become more of an issue than years past. I know the National Weather Service has changed the criteria for severe thunderstorms, but according to the small amount of research I have done wind speeds did NOT change. According to the ASTM E1105 water tests store fronts fail at 60 mph sustained and the weather service criteria for thunderstorms is 58 mph but more and more store fronts are beginning to fail or at least more water is showing up on the interior of buildings and the installs are correct. Has this become an issue everywhere? I am reading that some people within the weather service are wanting to change wind speeds for thunderstorms to 74 mph. My question is… if this does happen how long will it take the industry to react and change their criteria for store front water testing or will the industry go to curtain wall (or pre-glazed/unitized systems) standard to offset what will become a catastrophic failure for our industry with every store front installed?

    If you have some thoughts on this drop me a note or leave it in the comments. Thank you!
  • A lot of forecasting reports have been released in recent weeks. The Architectural Billings Index continues to be solid. The Dodge Momentum Index continues to be mixed. And this week CMD did a 2016 projections webinar with the main takeaway being commercial construction growing in an average range of 5 to 10 percent. So, the positive trends are continuing, though I think we all are looking at the geopolitical landscape with some concern. At least I am.
  • Here’s the latest update on the growth of the North American Contractor Certification (NACC) program. A number of companies have completed the certification and many are now in the queue. This is an extremely important process for our industry and if you are glazing contractor, it is absolutely something you should budget for in 2016, especially with the certification need showing up in more and more specifications…
  • Last this week, I watched a pretty cool documentary recently—“Drunk, Stoned, Brilliant, Dead: The Story of National Lampoon.” It’s a really interesting work, and all I could think of is our current society is so over the top “PC” that a magazine like that would last about 2 seconds before being bludgeoned by social media mobs and so on.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.
 
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.
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