Max Perilstein's blog

We can debate the merits of programs like LEED until we’re all blue in the face. The bottom line, though, is the performance and sustainability of the building when all is said and done. And while the various green rating systems are pivoting and making efforts to evolve their programs into ensuring long-range success, there’s one process that guarantees it: the Net Zero building.

Slowly but surely Net Zero is taking off. It's important in the glass industry, because the process rewards the glass/glazing performance and basically will force those pesky HVAC guys to size their efforts correctly. Too many times we get blamed (unfairly I must add) for the oversizing of HVAC units because there’s no trust in fenestration. With Net Zero, we’re all working together and the playing field does level. There’s a ton to this process, and it's still pretty raw, but I do believe it will be in the mainstream sooner than many think.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of sustainability, one of the great champions of the effort in our industry is Mark Silverberg of Technoform. Last week he was named to the AAMA Sustainability Steering Committee. Can’t get a better man than that to be a force in the effort!
  • The energy of the trade show/industry conference is the hottest in years. So far 2014 is showing a major uptick in attendance and excitement. A couple more regional shows are coming up to be aware of. The 27th Annual Mid Atlantic Glass Expo hits April 30th in Greenbelt, Md.  Then in Canada, the Canadian Glass Association's Glass Connections conference in Nova Scotia (would love to go, birthplace of the great Sidney Crosby) comes through on June 4-5. Both events will provide excellent learning and networking potential. And don’t forget about the granddaddy of them all, the biggest show in all of North America: GlassBuild America, in September in Vegas. That floor is filling up nicely, and it will be an incredible event not to be missed.
  • After a hiatus in doing interviews on the blog, we welcome that segment back. One area of the business that I am always fascinated by is switchable glass, specifically  liquid crystal and suspended particle products. These products are growing in usage thanks to the boom on the decorative glass side. It’s surely moving up from the “niche” category. So it was great to catch up with Anthony Branscum, director of architectural sales at Innovative Glass Corp. in New York, and talk with him about the growth of the product, some of misconceptions out there and more.

MP: What do you think is driving this positive direction and usage?

Anthony Branscum: I think it’s mainly because the products have come a long way and are now beyond the “Proof of Concept” stage. Architects around the country, and the world for that matter, are realizing the practical benefits of using these products in their designs. Perhaps more importantly, they have gained confidence that the technology will last when it gets out there. They have become educated consumers. 

MP: Speaking specifically on the liquid crystal product, there’s been talk recently in different circles about uneven performance and products failing. Do you think such talk is legitimate or is it being overblown?
 

AB: I have heard and read some of the same things you are alluding to. There’s a lot of posturing going on within the industry right now. Some suppliers of switchable glass are spending a lot of time bashing their competitors instead of talking about their own virtues. They believe it makes their product appear as if it’s “the best”, but what they’re really doing is hurting the industry at large. They’re creating a perception out there that the product won’t last.  It is simply not true.  When fabricated properly, one can expect many years of service from liquid crystal technology. Of course, there are companies that don’t produce a great product, but they are not the majority, and time will eventually run out on them.

MP: What should buyers do or look for to make sure they are dealing with the right people?

AB: They should make sure whoever they are dealing with can provide them a functioning sample. They should ask for a copy of the warranty. They should definitely ask for references and perhaps ask to see a job local to them where the glass has successfully been installed. If the vendor can’t satisfy these requests in a timely fashion, they should think twice about going too far with them. 

MP: You and your company have been in the switchable space for more than a decade. What are some of the biggest changes you have seen with the product offerings?

AB: The biggest change has been the advancement in the clarity of the LC films when they are in their clear state. The industry has come a long way in achieving better clarity. The second notable advancement would be the film widths. The product is available in wider widths than ever before. This helps satisfy most of the common architectural sizes we come across.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Some interesting news broke this week initially via the Twitter feed of John Wheaton. John linked to a press release that was posted a couple weeks previous about Underwriters Laboratory (UL) getting involved in testing and certifying the building envelope. This is pretty significant news because UL is simply a giant in the world (they’re everywhere really), and having them now a part of this industry will surely make some waves. At this point, it’s obviously too early to tell if the addition of UL to the landscape will be positive or negative. However, those of us who worked with UL on the solar side of things know they are tough and challenging to say the least. This one bears watching, folks…

Elsewhere…
And a few more notes on certification or testing and the like…

  • Since the NFRC announcement of a commercial program reboot and my blog, I’ve heard from a few people about their frustrations with the current program and its software bugs. The folks at NFRC surely have a hill to climb on this one as it sounds like more than just collaboration is needed to fix the program.
  • A few weeks ago I wrote about the glazier certification movement, NACC, and noted that the first certified companies were due in July. Well the first four to make it through the process have been certified, and from what I understand several others sit in the queue awaiting final approvals. This is a big movement for the industry; it has the potential to at least give credit to those organizations that are doing business the right way. I believe you will see more on this in the coming weeks and months.

Now for the non-certification pieces of the week…

  • Can those of you who live in the states with full service gas stations (New Jersey, Oregon) explain to me why? It is just so bizarre for me to pull up to a station and have someone swipe my card and pump my gas. I’m amazed that some states still even have it.
  • I really enjoyed this article by Bryan Bush about the value of GlassBuild America. Bryan is currently the chairman of the board of the NGA and a very successful businessman in his role at City Glass in Omaha, Nebraska. He knows what value is and I think gets the message across nicely here.
  • Last this week, can you believe it is August? This year seems to be flying at a record pace. Fall is now so close you can see it, especially with football starting up within the next 30 days or so. I know many parts of the country are going through serious heat waves, but I for one am not ready to return to the subarctic temps that we get in winter. So world… time… slow down some, eh?

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Every once in a while a bunch of subjects come up that interest me, and I think would interest all of you. So in no particular order, here’s a batch from this week that may get you going.

  • I noted last week to watch the Architectural Billings Index, and if you follow me on Twitter you would know its incredible number: a 55.7! That is the highest rating since 2007. I know we all sometimes doubt these numbers, but my goodness that’s an exciting one to see.
  • I saw a great article via the Twitter feed of Kawneer’s Donnie Hunter. It’s about how architects are not overly enthusiastic about specifying new products. I like the insight it shows and quite frankly presents a heck of a challenge to product manufacturers in trying to get their materials out there. Good, quick, and interesting read. Thank you Donnie.
  • So two big mergers in the healthcare world, and rates are also going up for 2016. I think no matter what system or plan is out there (Old way vs. Affordable Care Act), and what side of the political aisle you are on, this will continue to be a nightmare for everyone involved.
  • Do you have 200 million dollars laying around? If so, you too can build an experimental “ghost city” to test new technologies. This is fascinating. I guess if the real world won’t incorporate it first, this is the next best idea.
  • How in the world “The Americans” does not get an Emmy nomination for best drama is beyond me. That show is beyond excellent.
  • I often note industry websites that impress me, and this week I point to Galaxy Glass and Stone. Eugene Negrin and company have a fantastic site. Love the use of pictures and creative layout. Well done!
  • There is now research that it “pays to be green” when it comes to building. Obviously this study will be used by many in this business, and probably by the folks at USGBC who potentially hurt the process, but that’s another story for another time.
  • Because of all of the controversy on the Confederate flag, I find myself looking for more info and insight on the Civil War. Anyone have a good documentary or book to recommend?
  • Last this week, the buzz I am hearing about GlassBuild America is really blowing me away. More and more people are planning to attend and in my research of the show floor, I’m thoroughly impressed by some of the products and services that will be on display. For the innovation/diversification angle, this event will surely provide tons of it.


Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

When the news dropped that Jim Benney was leaving NFRC, I was curious if there would be another part to the puzzle. Sure enough there was, with news that the NFRC was renewing their commitment to the commercial fenestration industry with a certified rating system. There’s a ton I can go into, especially since I have been banging this drum for 10 years or so. But I’ll just say a few main things…

First and foremost, the industry needs a quality rating system. We’ve never been against a system, just past proposals. We need a logical system that makes sense and provides the results and details that everyone involved depends on. It’s a part of the commercial landscape more and more. And, we need a program that is not what’s best or easiest (or biggest money maker) for the test labs or councils, but one that’s best for the products involved and industry at large. (For some time, the commercial and residential industries were included in the same category.) In any case, ease of use and logic was something we hammered on for years during the process. So it’s going to be interesting to see what this new collaboration will be.  Will it be a true collaboration? I have my doubts. Regardless, I will have an open mind, because it is something that is needed.

Second, when did the “partners” listed become actual partners in the process? Three major organizations in our industry are now back in the process. I have to assume it was news to them. All will do what is right for the industry I believe, but I also found it odd that NFRC did not mention a few other players that had involvement back in the day, including the National Glass Association. I bring this up because how do you get true collaboration without all of the main players?

Finally, personally I feel vindicated in the fact that I warned (along with many others, of course) that the current program would not work, and it sure looks like we were right. I took (and still take in some areas) a ton of abuse over my role in this effort, but in the end my goal has and will always be to look out for the best interests of our industry.

Elsewhere…

  • OK from one worry to another. To my friends in the Pacific Northwest, I sure as heck hope this article on an earthquake hitting your part of the world is wrong. Really frightening read…
  • Interesting news via the Dodge Momentum Index. It trended down in June and has been relatively flat all year. This has been flying in the face of other indexes and also just the overall business climate. Especially the current put-in-place spending, which has been tremendous and has a future-facing component to it. The new ABI is due out this coming Wednesday the 22nd, so we’ll see what they say on the process.
  • Last this week, which of you awesome glaziers, fabricators, manufacturers and suppliers will be working on the world's largest “NetZero Plus” retrofit building in Los Angeles? The Electrical Training Institute in LA will be 142,000 square feet and is being promoted as the largest NetZero Plus building in the United States. They’re calling it the “intelligent building of the future” so I surely can’t wait to see what glass and glazing products are involved here.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Good economic news keeps coming our way. Construction spending in May broke the trillion-dollar mark, giving us the third straight trillion-dollar spend and the sixth month in a row that there’s been growth. May was very strong, as the last month with a better mark was way back in the glory days of October 2008. That of course was pretty much the last good month we had before the slide came. As we sit now, however, the “slide” doesn’t look apparent. Though concerns about the dollar, world unrest, and the financial health of Puerto Rico and Greece surely sit as a reminder that things can change quickly.

Elsewhere…

  • Saw an interesting study on the fact that larger office buildings are taking more advantage of green building practices than smaller. So I am curious. Why do you think that is? Scale? Cost? Ego? I just find it surprising because the study shows that less than 5 percent of US office buildings smaller than 100,000 square feet are qualified as green. I guess I can also question the study because smaller offices may be green or even more "green" than any standard, but choose to save money and not be certified. But I just find the big vs. small angle interesting.
  • I pretty much prop the great work from Glass Magazine every month, but this latest issue is different. This content is off-the-charts incredible. Great columns, great insights and amazing projects to look at with the Glass Magazine Awards section. And once again, in what is becoming my favorite section, the “Here’s an Idea…” piece was stellar with a look at AGNORA’s health and fitness efforts. Great work.
  • And while I’m being biased towards this excellent magazine, I should add that my ad of the month is the one for GlassBuild America. Loved the format and layout of it featuring a question/answer set up. Go check it out; it gets you thinking, and those who “get it” will be on the floor at the show ensuring they don’t end up like companies in the Question.
  • How cool was the US Women’s Soccer team winning the World Cup? I loved it. I don’t watch sports like I used to, so this was a really enjoyable one to take in. And a 5-2 soccer game? That just never happens in that sport.
  • I just started to watch the new mini-series on CNN called “The Seventies” and it’s tremendous. The first episode was about TV and they spent quite a bit of time on the shows of that era. Most notably “All in the Family.” After watching clips of that, it dawned on me that show, which was so groundbreaking, could never happen today. It’s pretty mind boggling if you think about it. Anyway, if you want excellent one-hour looks back at that decade, check it out.

Read on for the video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

A bit of an odd week as a couple of emotional things occurred. First the news of the passing of long-time industry rep Pat McIntosh really threw me for a loop. Pat was an excellent man, always friendly and dedicated, and always smiling when I saw him. He will truly be missed. My condolences to Pat’s family and friends.

Also, right before the holiday, the NFRC announced that CEO Jim Benney left the organization. As many of you know, I’ve battled the NFRC for more than 10 years and many times drove Jim up the wall--even debated him once in Boston at a trade show. Despite me being a true pain in the rear, Jim always treated me well and always kept a cool and calm composure. I am not sure where Jim will end up next, but I wish him only the best. It's interesting that in the same week the USGBC had their CEO resign as well. Could Jim be headed there?! Crazier things have happened…

Elsewhere…

  • My last post on the issue of birds and glass was one of my most popular posts ever. Obviously this is an issue that is more intense than I realized. I heard from so many diverse people, both in and out of the industry, and got tremendous leads and insights on the process. The best part was people really wanting to be a part of a solution, and that was nice. In the meantime I plan on staying on this and learning more (and sharing here of course) from some of the new friends I just made.
  • Congrats to my friends at GGI on the launch of their new website. What a fantastic piece of work there.
  • Also congrats go out to my old co-worker and friend Scott Goodman on his new gig with AGC. Good to see him land there and probably get to work with another old friend Matt Ferguson. That would be a fun road trip to be on if those two make calls together.
  • I have to stress that if you are on Twitter and you are not following Glass Magazine, you need to stop what you are doing right now and do so. For every big event the live tweeting is so great and so informative. This week was the AAMA conference and once again I felt like I was there. Great to get the flavor and no other feed comes close to the live content that Glass Magazine’s provides.
  • Last this week, if you watched and liked the show “The Men Who Built America” then you will probably like the new one out called “American Genius.” Same sort of historical look at the men and women who made their marks on many facets of our lives. Some episodes better than others (the Steve Jobs vs. Bill Gates one was not great), but still worth the watch if you enjoy history and the analysis of it.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

I had a feeling the issue of bird protective glazing was going to be a big one this year, and it surely has been. And now with the latest news from Duke University, our industry has to be even more prepared to deal with some of the blowback. Before I get into the last part, I will admit that I struggled last year with the process and intentions on some of the bird-related issues surrounding the Minnesota football stadium. In the end, I surely misread the situation and the objectives of the people involved who wanted consideration for the bird population that will be affected by the structure. So it’s been a learning experience for sure.

Now fast forward to this past week and to where our industry now has to be prepared. At Duke University, one of the “green” buildings on campus is being blamed for the 85 bird deaths during three migration periods in the last year. There are many ways I can go with this story, but I’ll just say this: There are options for bird-friendly glazing. And it’s time for the focus to go from the glass being an issue to the glass being a solution. The owner/architect needs to be on some of the hooks here. The materials are there, and the designer needs to take into account bird migration paths and design accordingly. While you’ll see in the linked article that glass is listed as the bad guy, I sincerely hope that we as an industry can stand up and note that it simply shouldn’t be all on us.

Elsewhere…

  • By the way, I have to think Julie Schimmelpenningh, who brought the issue of bird protection up years and years ago at a GANA meeting to mostly giggles, has to be shaking her head right now and saying “I told you so…”
  • An interesting new market study was just released about the glass industry. According to a blurb from a study by Grand View Research Inc., the global flat glass market will register a compound annual growth rate of 7.1 percent over the next seven years. It noted “High performance flat glass will drive the market.”  Wow.
  • I am trying to raise my level of organization. I have cleaned my desk with the goal of it looking like Russ Ebeid’s. (His desk, perfectly clear; with me, it will never happen, but I will try.) I am also trying to go “Inbox Zero” with my emails. Slowly but surely I am getting there. I know a few of you are doing the “Inbox Zero” thing, so any other tips are welcomed.
  • Just wrapping up my search for someone in the industry with an Apple Watch. Tom Lee of Lee & Cates hit me up on Twitter to say he has one, so he’s the visionary! I’m looking forward to hopefully seeing him at GlassBuild America to see how it is still going. Meanwhile, I did hear through the grapevine that my good friend Kris Vockler also has one. That does not surprise me as Kris is always on the cutting edge of everything.
  • Last this week, gas prices are going back up. My guess is $4 in most places by mid July. I know that the low prices had some negative effects on the economy, but man I enjoyed it personally.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

A few months ago, I briefly mentioned a glazier certification movement, and this week after fielding some questions from interested parties, I looked into it to see what was new. Everything is still on pace. I communicated with the program managers (John Kent and Jeff Dalaba), and they shared that 14 companies have gone through the process so far, and there is a plan to release the first batch of certified glaziers in July. Find more information here.

This program could surely help companies improve themselves, but more importantly improve the industry as a whole. And as I have noted here many times (like last week on Hale Glass and their internal programs), making the industry better benefits everyone in the end.

Elsewhere….

  • Registration for GlassBuild America opened this week and expectations for the show are strong. The floor is loaded with amazing suppliers, and the amount of innovation on display will be mind blowing. Obviously I am excited, because I believe in the importance of this show (and I do work for the show, too), but this year the level of exhibits is beyond any expectation. Get registered now. If you register before June 25, you will be entered into a contest to win four tickets to the Braves/Blue Jays games at GlassBuild America night at the ballpark. Good stuff. Obviously as the show grows closer, I will have more previews and insight here.
  • Follow up from last week: Scott Surma does NOT have an Apple Watch. I am stunned. My next guesses were Dan Plotnick and Ted Bleecker, but since I did not hear from either guy, I am guessing they don’t have one either. So far, no one I know is fessing up to having one.
  • As an industry we get many bad raps. One of them is that we are not great on retrofits of historic buildings. The excuse is that the glass ruins it, because it will stand out as newer.  That has been disproven many times and now once again. This hotel project featured in “Great Glazing” proves that we can do so much. Congrats to everyone involved on this project.
  • Welcome to one the brightest and best in the industry joining those of us who blog at Glass Magazine and on e-glass weekly. As you surely saw last week, a post from John Wheaton appeared on GlassMagazine.com, and it’s great to have him on the team. I am a huge fan of John’s, and I know his posts will be incredibly popular. John is as dynamic and interesting as they come.
  • I read an article this week on solar paved roads. There are five pilot projects that are slated to happen in Idaho later this year, and it will be interesting to see if the materials used work and are at all user friendly. If this works, it should have a huge effect on society and also our overall energy usage. The only bad news is this process is surely decades away from being mainstream, but I have a feeling that is when we will need it the most.
  • Last this week, I made mention of a person I am a huge fan of during a few meetings recently. Others in the meeting immediately jumped on me for “always complimenting everyone” and asked if I actually have negative words to say about anyone. The main person asking has only known me for about 2 years, so they never saw me in my miserable, rip-on-the-world mode. I did tell them to go look at my blog in 2005 and 2006… and I actually went back and looked. My goodness was I unhinged sometimes. While I know many wish I could unload on things like I used to, I surely never would want to go back to the maniac I was then!

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

On the heels of last week's note about the down ABI, an opposite and very positive trend emerged this week. For the month of April, the seasonally adjusted annual rate of construction spending topped the $1 trillion mark for the first time since November 2008. Any time you see a stat that refers to the “first time” since pre-Great Recession, it is surely something to note. Combine this with a very positive trend on the put-in-place investment numbers, and right now things are surely moving in the right direction.

Elsewhere…

  • At the end of June, Jan Rogan of PPG is retiring, which is a huge loss. She is one of the greatest and nicest people in the industry. Anyone who has ever had the honor of dealing with Jan will miss her. I’ve been lucky enough to know Jan for most of my professional glass life and will always be grateful for her help and assistance along the way, not to mention seeing her smiling face at various trade shows. We will miss you, Jan. Enjoy retirement; you deserve it!
  • Props to the folks at IGMA on their latest bulletin on Vacuum Insulating Glass. There’s no question that VIG is something that intrigues many. The potential has been staring people in the face a long time, but getting it into a mass production scenario has always seemed to be the bugaboo. IGMA putting out this document will surely help educate the masses about this product line and give decision makers the proper insight on where and why this technology may work.
  • I’m a month behind with my normal “best ad of the month in Glass Magazine” thoughts. But actually for this month I am skipping the ad and giving kudos to the Here's an Idea... article on the very last page. The folks at Hale Glass have their own internal training program, and the article there breaks down what and why they do what they do. It’s an excellent read, and congrats to Brian Hale and everyone at Hale Glass for making themselves—and in effect the industry—better!
  • Anyone have an Apple Watch? Curious if you like/use it. Why do I have a feeling former glass industry star Scott Surma will be the one to tell me he has one…?
  • Another question while I am at it: does anyone really believe that driverless cars will make it in our world? I know several major players are experimenting with this, but I just can’t see it working at any sort of level in our society. Too many moving parts and pieces, but the big thing is liability. Especially in the United States. The liability issue curbs tons of enthusiastic and entrepreneurial approaches on a daily basis; this one would get trampled by it.
  • Last this week, a great link that anyone in the glass industry will enjoy—Hollywood making the crash through a window look “safe and easy.” All of us surely know how it really is! The link lists four other things that Hollywood makes different than reality as well. Good stuff.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Is there cause for concern after the latest Architectural Billings Index fell again this past month? The headlines surely give you pause, but when you dig into the report, it does not look as negative as you may think. The “New Projects” rating was positive again as was the “Design Contracts” index. Plus the winter weather may have left a bit of hangover when it comes to the overall performance. I not only see, but also continue to hear, too much positivity and confidence in the economic future of our industry to raise the red flag yet. Obviously this and the other indexes bear watching. But for now, I wouldn’t consider this last report anything but a blip on the radar.

Elsewhere…

  • Congrats to Tubelite on celebrating their 70th year in business. Really an incredible and impressive run through some volatile territory and times.
  • Excellent article in the new Glass Magazine on ergonomics in the workplace. It is a must read, especially when you are talking health and welfare of your plant personnel. Kudos to Lisec, AGNORA, and all others engaged in this excellent process.
  • Minnesota is home to some of the best minds in our industry. And now that state has a city that is going to really do something fascinating. Rochester, Minnesota, is working to transform itself and doing so with an ambitious 20 year, $6.5 billion renewal that will surely need a lot of glass. Fast Company magazine has the insight and it’s a great read.
  • As many know, I am a big fan of solar, and I still believe in it. But even though solar performance is growing and products are improving there’s still a massive reluctance to use it. The big utilities still stand in the way of solar growth and there are a few states that are letting that happen. It’s an unfortunate battle that is not good in the end for our environment or energy needs. It also does affect many in our industry that supply to it, though I do know much of it does come from off shore. Still a tough one in any form.
  • For those of you in my generation, a fun documentary to watch: “Atari-Game Over”  is a good one chronicling the rise and fall of Atari with regards to one game and its burial in a landfill. Technology on gaming has come so far in such a short time, and this documentary was a pretty neat walk through the 80s and the initial gaming explosion.
  • Last this week, just downloaded a new book I am looking forward to reading.  “Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry” is now in my queue and while I will never go back to a Blackberry (I love my iPhone), I have a feeling this insider tale may be one to immerse myself in and enjoy. Once done I’ll provide a review. Still finishing the current book “Becoming Steve Jobs,” which has been a solid read for sure.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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