Max Perilstein's blog

We can debate the merits of programs like LEED until we’re all blue in the face. The bottom line, though, is the performance and sustainability of the building when all is said and done. And while the various green rating systems are pivoting and making efforts to evolve their programs into ensuring long-range success, there’s one process that guarantees it: the Net Zero building.

Slowly but surely Net Zero is taking off. It's important in the glass industry, because the process rewards the glass/glazing performance and basically will force those pesky HVAC guys to size their efforts correctly. Too many times we get blamed (unfairly I must add) for the oversizing of HVAC units because there’s no trust in fenestration. With Net Zero, we’re all working together and the playing field does level. There’s a ton to this process, and it's still pretty raw, but I do believe it will be in the mainstream sooner than many think.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of sustainability, one of the great champions of the effort in our industry is Mark Silverberg of Technoform. Last week he was named to the AAMA Sustainability Steering Committee. Can’t get a better man than that to be a force in the effort!
  • The energy of the trade show/industry conference is the hottest in years. So far 2014 is showing a major uptick in attendance and excitement. A couple more regional shows are coming up to be aware of. The 27th Annual Mid Atlantic Glass Expo hits April 30th in Greenbelt, Md.  Then in Canada, the Canadian Glass Association's Glass Connections conference in Nova Scotia (would love to go, birthplace of the great Sidney Crosby) comes through on June 4-5. Both events will provide excellent learning and networking potential. And don’t forget about the granddaddy of them all, the biggest show in all of North America: GlassBuild America, in September in Vegas. That floor is filling up nicely, and it will be an incredible event not to be missed.
  • After a hiatus in doing interviews on the blog, we welcome that segment back. One area of the business that I am always fascinated by is switchable glass, specifically  liquid crystal and suspended particle products. These products are growing in usage thanks to the boom on the decorative glass side. It’s surely moving up from the “niche” category. So it was great to catch up with Anthony Branscum, director of architectural sales at Innovative Glass Corp. in New York, and talk with him about the growth of the product, some of misconceptions out there and more.

MP: What do you think is driving this positive direction and usage?

Anthony Branscum: I think it’s mainly because the products have come a long way and are now beyond the “Proof of Concept” stage. Architects around the country, and the world for that matter, are realizing the practical benefits of using these products in their designs. Perhaps more importantly, they have gained confidence that the technology will last when it gets out there. They have become educated consumers. 

MP: Speaking specifically on the liquid crystal product, there’s been talk recently in different circles about uneven performance and products failing. Do you think such talk is legitimate or is it being overblown?
 

AB: I have heard and read some of the same things you are alluding to. There’s a lot of posturing going on within the industry right now. Some suppliers of switchable glass are spending a lot of time bashing their competitors instead of talking about their own virtues. They believe it makes their product appear as if it’s “the best”, but what they’re really doing is hurting the industry at large. They’re creating a perception out there that the product won’t last.  It is simply not true.  When fabricated properly, one can expect many years of service from liquid crystal technology. Of course, there are companies that don’t produce a great product, but they are not the majority, and time will eventually run out on them.

MP: What should buyers do or look for to make sure they are dealing with the right people?

AB: They should make sure whoever they are dealing with can provide them a functioning sample. They should ask for a copy of the warranty. They should definitely ask for references and perhaps ask to see a job local to them where the glass has successfully been installed. If the vendor can’t satisfy these requests in a timely fashion, they should think twice about going too far with them. 

MP: You and your company have been in the switchable space for more than a decade. What are some of the biggest changes you have seen with the product offerings?

AB: The biggest change has been the advancement in the clarity of the LC films when they are in their clear state. The industry has come a long way in achieving better clarity. The second notable advancement would be the film widths. The product is available in wider widths than ever before. This helps satisfy most of the common architectural sizes we come across.

Read on for links and video of the week...

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

2017 is off and running, and aside from a rocky weather start in many parts of North America, it’s been pretty quiet overall. With that in mind it’s time to take a look at my fearless predictions for the coming year with regards to trends in our industry. Here goes…

More Unitized. The growth of the unitized curtain wall process will be significant. This has been a growing segment over the last few years and in 2017 it will take another step forward. And this is a trend that is not going to burn out thanks to significant labor shortages in the field. In addition, more and more unitized systems are performing at incredible levels energy wise, making them extra attractive to building owners and designers.

Net Zero. Even with the political winds shifting in the United States, the desire and charge to still build with energy efficiency and sustainability is very strong. Building to a Net Zero performance is actually accomplishing more than if you went through some “green” rating system, and more and more people are realizing that. 

Security. Again. As I noted last week, this was on my list for 2016 and I am putting it back on for 2017. It’s unfortunate that as a world we have to think this way, but it’s reality. I am seeing more security product options available hitting different application needs, and that too makes this an area to follow.

Deals and Acquisitions. Considering that at least two major deals that I expected to hit at the end of 2016 haven’t happened yet, this could be an easy prediction for me when they hit this year. But even aside from that, there are still a lot of people looking to buy and sell right now as well as companies looking to diversify through acquisition. All of that makes it ripe for a big deal year.

New Social Push.  A fun one to end it. At this point mostly everyone is familiar with the basic social outlets like Facebook and Twitter. Some people love them and some not. (Example: I loved following Matt Hale of Global Glass on Facebook as he flew to and worked around China this week.) However, the freshest outlets going right now are podcasts, Periscope and Facebook live. These take communication to the next level. As I noted a few weeks ago, John Wheaton has done a great job pushing his Periscope approach, and kudos to the folks at GCI Consultants who launched a podcast program. I have always harped on communication, and these new outlets are just another way to educate, inform and promote.

So there you go… It’s shaping up to be a great year overall and I am looking forward to everything that happens in our industry and covering it here!

Elsewhere…

We had three big industry personnel moves to start the year, featuring three of the most talented people in our world. 

  • First, Dr. Helen Sanders joined Technoform. I have written about Helen a lot over the years. She’s been a brilliant representative of our industry at the code and trade level, and a massive credit to the dynamic glass segment. She’ll continue to do great things at Technoform. I need to note that even with Helen leaving Sage, they are still in fantastic shape talent wise and I am confident they will continue to be an industry leader and supporter. 
  • Next was my pal Scott Goodman joining Aldora. Scott is a relentless sales professional and my respect for him is deep. He’s a great hire and he will be a force to be reckoned with in his territory. 
  • Last, a major coup for the folks at Guardian with the tremendous addition of Darijo Babic. Anyone who knows Darijo likes him and absolutely respects his skill and passion for his work. He represents our industry very well at the architectural level and will do fantastic things for Guardian in that regard. 

Congratulations to all three of you and to your new companies for bringing you on.

  • Obviously, later this week in the United States, we will start a new adventure. I will be most curious on what happens with the healthcare system. Right now that may be the most frustrating thing going. But we’ll see how that and all else goes as we begin with a new administration.
  • Last this week, I am pushing off the Glass Magazine review to next post. I know my audience, and if I start flying past 700+ words, I’ll lose you…. So we’ll hit that and much more next time!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Hope everyone had a great holiday season and you are ready to roll into a very exciting year ahead! But before we look forward into 2017, it’s time to look back at 2016 and see how everything shook out with regards to my predictions at the front of the year. I made five predictions and I don’t believe I was far off…

1. Go big or go home. I predicted that the trend of going bigger was not ending anytime soon. With Guardian and Vitro putting in jumbo coaters (and Viracon which announced last year) and more oversize coming from all parts of the world, I’d say this was dead on. 

2. Security focused. I talked about the need for security glazing. It did not take off like I thought it would, but by no means do I think this area was a dud. I’d give myself half credit here, and quite frankly I think I may put this on the 2017 list, too. 

3. Greenfielding is back and new players emerge. The new players emerging were surely a trend in 2016, but only a few greenfields, and I was shocked that very few established fabricators did it. Plus none of the bigger folks from overseas jumped in yet with facilities in North America. They may still do it by acquisition or wait until the American dollar value changes. This is a failed call by me at this point.

4. Codes and certifications. No major issues on the code side thanks to a mellow year, but also tremendous work by those who represent us at that level. (Visit my MVP articles to see those names.) However, the certification side did get its feet down, and the work and advancement from groups like the NACC cannot be denied.

5. More focus on birds. This was on the list in 2015 as well and the focus without a doubt continued to grow. While there are still too many new buildings being built without bird protection in mind, many more are. With more products than ever available, I believe this is an area of concern that will continue to be addressed and the usage of the right design and products utilized.

Overall not that bad—surely better than my sports predictions (sorry Panther and Bengal fans!). Next week I will have my predictions for 2017.

Elsewhere…

  • The new year has begun, and somewhat shockingly to me, a few of the deals that I was told would be done by year-end still are not complete. So I guess we’ll see if the first quarter breaks anything loose on that front. 
  • The Sotawall/Apogee deal that closed right after my last blog of 2016 is a good one for both sides and surely is a great addition to the already powerful Apogee group of companies.
  • The November Architectural Billings Index hit positive levels again with 50.6. That is basically unchanged from the previous month. The interesting news was that new project inquiries were up sharply to 59.5. That’s an area to watch, as with a new presidential administration this would be the first area to see any change, positive or negative.
  • Congrats to good friend and excellent rep Margaret Brune. She continues to land excellent clients, most recently curtain wall manufacturer FreMarq Innovations. Good match of talent there and good to see!
  • Last this week, the coolest buildings of 2016 according to the folks at Construct Connect. Four of the five are on North American soil, which I am not sure has happened a lot in recent years. Take a look and if you had anything to do with these amazing structures, drop me a line! Would love to give you proper credit for being involved in something so “cool.”
  • Next week, predictions for 2017, Glass Magazine issue review, a great video and more!

 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Last week I announced the group of candidates that came close but ultimately did not win the 2016 Industry MVP. As I noted then, so many great people and companies are worthy, and picking one is truly a challenge. For the winner this year, I went with a person that I have seen first hand making a difference in our world. This person is active at the trade group level, taking a leadership role and bringing a passionate approach to it.  his person also uses his voice online to educate the industry on issues and situations that we all really need to pay attention to. In fact he took one of my pet causes and has brought tons of attention to the holes there and did it in a classy but forceful way. Plus our winner is just flat out a good person and I have been a fan of his for years.

So without any further build up, the winner of the 2016 Industry MVP is Chuck Knickerbocker of Technical Glass Products. Chuck will probably want to kill me for heaping all this praise, but it is deserved! Also props must go to Chuck’s employer, TGP. They obviously see the great value in having Chuck out and active in the industry. Ao a thank you and a nod to the management and team there. Congratulations, Chuck- keep up the good work at GANA, your blog, and hammering on NFRC and the other issues that concern our world daily.

Elsewhere…

  • While I am in the handing out good news mode, major kudos to Bendheim on the release of its updated website. The new site is fantastic. Loaded with info and details. Building websites is not easy. Populating them with great resources is a massive challenge. Congrats to the folks at Bendheim for the excellent work!
  • Following up on the AIA story and their membership “uprising” over the post-election press release. The Media Relations Director of AIA resigned last week, and according to sources in published reports, it was because the AIA ignored his direction in the whole process. Like I noted when this happened, this was a massive PR failure on many levels and continues to be one as negative press is still active. As one commenter online noted, “Sometimes it's worthwhile to listen to your PR expert.” 
  • I recently saw the new movie “Dr. Strange,” and one glass-related item stood out for me. In many of the stunts, it looked to me like it was good old annealed glass being broken out instead of the usual tempered. This movie had a ton of computer-generated graphics, so maybe that was it, but it was jarring to see large annealed shards breaking in scenes with human interaction.
  • In my first post of 2017, I will review what we experienced in 2016 and hit on the trends expected in the New Year. One trend will be advanced social media, like Periscope. The great John Wheaton is making a major effort with that platform and the episodes I have been lucky enough to catch have been interesting and thought provoking. More on this and others in a future post, but follow John at @johnlwheaton1 on Twitter and you’ll get the notifications of his next Periscope. 
  • This will be the last scheduled post for 2016. Obviously that may change, as there are at least two major industry transactions that may take place before year end, so if and when they do break, I’ll make some comments on Twitter and here. I truly enjoy the communication with all of you and I thank you for your support. I believe 2017 will be an excellent year and I am excited to experience it. (Well all but the part of my daughter going to college in 2017. I am NOT excited about that…) In any case I would like to take this time to wish all of my readers a HAPPY and HEALTHY holiday season and year ahead. Take care and enjoy!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

It’s time to talk Industry MVP, but a few items before I start with the 2016 process. In my last post on this, I screwed up. I forgot a past winner, which was C.R. Laurence in 2014. I’m getting old and after 11 years of weekly posts, I’m not as sharp as I used to be! 

Before I unveil the runners up for this year, I want to recall all of the previous winners and runners up. The reason being is pretty much all of these people and companies are still very active and important in our world. And I am also trying not to repeat anyone, though it’s getting tough as some of the past runners up could be MVP most years. So for the future I may have to rethink. Anyway, let’s look back before we go forward.

2013

Winner: Tracy Rogers

Runners up:

  • Tom Culp
  • Mark Silverberg
  • Ed Zaucha
  • Mic Patterson
  • Oliver Stepe
  • Dr. Helen Sanders
  • Scott Thomsen

2014

Winner: C.R. Laurence

Runners up:

  • John Wheaton
  • Rick Wright
  • Tom O’Malley
  • Bernard Lax

2015

Winner: Jon Kimberlain

Runners up:

  • Garret Henson
  • Walker Glass
  • Dip Tech
  • Kris Vockler

On to 2016. This group of people and companies stepped up, represented their organizations and the industry with class and passion. My judging parameters as always:

  • Overall influence on the industry in 2016 
  • Technology/Innovation
  • Industry Support/Education
  • My opinion and knowledge of them and what they do. In the end, it’s my call and I own it. 

Mike Albert, S Albert Glass

Not only has Mike’s company been a long-time fixture in the glass and glazing world, but also he’s been a leading force at the National Glass Association as a board member and most recently Chairman. The NGA is surging now, and Mike absolutely had a hand in that and his overall care and passion for the industry are always on display.

The team of Thom Zaremba and Urmilla Jokhu-Sowell

I’m going with this duo, though it’s normally a trio with Dr. Tom Culp as the third. But Tom was a runner up in 2013, so he’s on the list already. Simply said, what Thom and Urmilla do for this industry is so crucial and so important I am not sure I can give it enough emphasis. They represent our industry at code levels all over the world and navigate some choppy waters. It’s hard to do the “right” thing when there may be competing levels of “right,’ yet these two do it and do it well and with respect. Without question, they have helped raise the level of respect our industry gets from other industries thanks to their professional and classy manner.

Sapa

The only company to make the list this year. I love that they take an aggressive approach to education with their Architectural Profile Academy and Shapes. Al website. Smart to teach and grow the audience the right way and these things take time and resources, so kudos to them for that. Plus a nod to Mark Spencer of Sapa who is a positive fixture at every event and one that carries the company mission out perfectly.

All listed above are worthy to win this year, but there was one person who rose above to win it and next week on my final post of the year, I’ll reveal who that is.

That’s it for this week. Next week, not only will I have the winner but also a look at a great new website from a classic industry company, annealed glass in the movies, more AIA/Trump press release fall out and much more!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

I'm back at it for the final stretch of the year and the hits keep coming,leading off with a lot coming from Guardian. The main news that hit right before the holiday: a subsidiary of Koch Industries purchased the remaining 55.5 percent of the company to now own it in full. This is a positive piece of news given that Koch stuck their feet in the water a few years ago with the initial purchase and liked it enough to go all in. This bodes well for how our industry is viewed and the potential going forward. And speaking of the future, Guardian announced the addition of a new jumbo coater. That also is big news in that the commitment to continue to grow and support our industry is there. And without a doubt, the trend of jumbo sizes is one that is growing. (I would love to get that stat on average IG size that I mentioned a few weeks ago; it has to be growing!) So congrats to all involved at Guardian; very exciting and positive times there right now for sure.

Elsewhere…

 

  • And staying on the trail of positivity, the latest ABI did bounce back into positive territory. So the two-month down trend has stopped. The results continue to look like 2017 and into 2018 will be solid, but not spectacular. And as far as I am concerned, solid works. 
  • If you want some additional economic insight for the United States and Canada, check this out from Alex Carrick, chief economist of Construct Connection. Good and interesting stuff as always. 
  • This has been out there some, but I finally ran into it. Drones and construction. I’m blown away that it’s the construction world that is the main user of drone technology. This article stated that drones would change the way construction is done. Wow. 
  • Zero Net Energy consumption or the Net Zero Building continues to gain steam. This past week Santa Monica, California adopted an ordinance pushing it. The glass and glazing industry does have wonderful and effective products to support these efforts, so this is something I hope we see growing more and more. Not to mention, it is good for the world in the long run, too!
  • Last this week, a Japanese scientist has carried out clinical trials that show if you eat ice cream for breakfast you are smarter and more effective with your day and work. He had subjects eat ice cream right after they woke up and then tested from there. Sadly I had to give up ice cream a few years ago so I can’t try this, but really amazing to think that this could work. Could it be mix of cold and sugar snapping the brain to action? 

 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

The interesting news this week comes from the AIA and its membership. The AIA put out a formal statement commenting on the recent U.S. election, and there’s been some backlash online from it. With the intensity on both sides of the election, I have a feeling we’re only at the start of this specific adventure. There’s tons of politics here I can get into, but I’m not doing that. I’ll only weigh in from a PR standpoint and my take there is I have no idea why the AIA would make a statement WHEN they did. The timing absolutely made no sense; there was no urgency or call for their opinion at that time, and they were obviously not prepared for the statement to go viral within the community like it has. So lessons here are: 1) you have to know your customer base or your membership and 2) you have to have a sense of timing. And it’s surely looking like in this case the AIA did neither. What happens next in the AIA world will bear some watching.

Elsewhere… 

  • After GlassBuild America I got a call with a great question I could not answer: Do we as an industry know what our average opening size is? And has that opening size changed at all in the last few years or is it expected to change going forward? The angle here is there’s this major push for oversize. Everyone seemingly is addressing it one way or another, so the trend is there. But, I can’t find or figure out what averages are. So if you have some insight on yesterday, today and tomorrow with regards to the average opening size, please drop me a line.
  • The November issue of Glass Magazine is out and once again quite a bit of excellent content to take in. The issue is dedicated to the “Top Metal Companies,” so some interesting profiles both on companies and projects. Also I liked the quick pieces from industry heavyweights Joe Erb of Quanex and Chris Giovannielli of Kawneer. Plus the Q&A with Michael Spellman from IGE is a must read.
  • The ad of the month award was a tough one with many strong candidates. People ask me how I choose this. First thing I do is flip through the magazine without stopping to read. I see if any ad jumps at me to make me stop. I then note the ads that do and then review and decide. And I do try to rotate the honors as some companies could win every month. So this time around the nod goes to DormaKaba. I liked the ad; caught my eye with a simple title. And, I will admit, I had no idea this was an actual company of Dorma and Kaba, so I learned something too!
  • Great resource that I was reminded about via email blast (and on those e mails: if done right, very effective) from Vitro. The “Search Products” tool that breaks down products, performance and aesthetics. Very helpful! 
  • The new Apple headquarter campus is coming along. This week, new drone footage was released and it’s worth the watch. Right now the site is ugly with dirt everywhere, but once they fill that in with the proposed green spaces, the building and environment should be absolutely awesome. 
  • Last this week, just a programming note. No blog next week (Nov. 22), though if news breaks I will post something and also have comments on Twitter. Otherwise I’ll be back in this space for the last week of November. Happy Thanksgiving to my friends in the United States!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

The major news from the past week was the deal between J.E. Berkowitz and Consolidated Glass Holdings. This was one of the major rumors that was circulating at GlassBuild, and it came to fruition. It’s a great deal for CGH, with the very high profile of Berkowitz and its long track record of success. This is a game changer for them. Plus I am sure it was a great deal for Arthur Berkowitz and his family, as I can’t imagine he’d agree to anything less than the best. And as for those other rumors? I think a few are very real and will be happening in the near future. So hold on tight; there’s a lot more to go.

Elsewhere…

  • Last week I mentioned the Dodge Outlook results, and I have had some time to dig through those results as well as some other points of information out there. Here are some tidbits…

Residential growth is positive: single-family housing especially is ticking up 7 percent in 2016 and 9 percent is forecast for 2017. In fact, residential had its best year since 2005. Why that matters is when residential starts to tumble, that’s when the warning signs start to show up on the commercial side. So far, the coast is clear.

Surprisingly non-residential building did have an off year in 2016; not sure we felt it in the industry given where we are in the chain, and also the previous bounce backs carrying on from the past years. On this one, there are many industry folks who believe we run a good couple of years behind this metric. So potentially this could mean we’ll have some weak spots in 2017, but the forecast going forward is strong, expected up 6 percent with spending up 8 percent. So if we dip, it may not be sustained.

Last, the most positive data point for our world? A look back. When reviewed, the amount of infrastructure projects started in 2015 were more than any time in history, and the analysis says it will generate spending through 2017 and deep into 2018. 

Obviously these are forecasts and they can and do change. And a certain election in the United States will have an effect, just no clue on what that effect will be!

  • Just a heads up for those of you who deal with submittals for LEED. Note that the LEED v4 is now in effect. No new jobs can be registered under the previous standard of LEED 2009. If the jobs have already been registered, but not started, they can proceed and finish with that previous standard. So you’ll still see it, but otherwise get yourself familiar with LEED v4 as it's now here to stay. Guardian has a great online resource. They do a nice job of explaining the two standards, the changeover and then details. Good stuff.
  • Speaking of good stuff, great blog post from Pete DeGorter last week. Love that he took the time to do it and document with pictures. Nice work there.
  • Ever wonder how the mega sky scraper is built? Really well done and informative piece here. I just love the thought process that goes into it. 
  • It’s that time of year again to have our Industry MVP award. Once again, lots of great candidates out there. So this will not be an easy choice that is for sure. As always, I am open to suggestions so send them my way. What makes the MVP? Someone who works hard for the industry, communicates well, is involved at the trade level, and is always looking to advance our cause. That could be on the technical, education or innovation side. So who will join Tracy Rogers and Jon Kimberlain as winners?  I’ll be listing the runners up on my post the week of 12/11 with the winner honored the week of 12/18 on my last blog of 2016.
  • Last this week, this Friday is Veteran's Day in the United States. Please take a moment to appreciate what the women and men of the military have done (and still do daily) to protect our way of life. They are the true heroes. Thank you.

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

One of the bigger stories that came out of GlassBuild America was the co-locating of the GANA Fall Conference with GlassBuild in 2017. The Fall Conference brings some crucial technical pieces to the forefront, along with other important industry news and updates. Having it now integrated with the largest tradeshow in North America will surely open it up to more people who had never attended before, those that used to attend but scheduling prevented them from doing so, or additional members from a single company when normally a company would only send one person.  Moves like this are very good for the industry. We have so much out there education wise, but I think only a small percentage of people are taking advantage of it. Hopefully with a wider base things like this and the newly re-launched MyGlassClass.com will reach the larger audience and we can continue to grow and prosper as an industry!

Elsewhere…

 

  • Speaking of education and growth, one group who I admire is the Efficient Window Collaborative. I have written about them a few times here and I am fan. Recently they launched an updated website, and it is absolutely fantastic. Please check it out at http://www.efficientwindows.org and remember this too is a great training tool for your folks and resource for your customers. Kudos to Kerry Haglund and team for a job well done.
  • Also on the website resource side, Mark Spencer of SAPA turned me on to www.Shapes.Al and it is a really interesting and helpful resource for all things aluminum. They took an interesting approach with writing more feature-like pieces than technical articles. Lots of content and worth visiting.
  • The industry lost another long-time player last week with the passing of Tom Petersen. Tom spent 46 years in the glazing world and was extremely well known and respected in the Missouri/Kansas region. He will certainly be missed and condolences to his family and friends. 
  • Anyone else suffering with healthcare costs? My monthly costs will now be 110 percent more per month than they were three years ago. It really is an issue that has gotten lost in the absolute mess of the U.S. election.
  • As you may have seen, the Architectural Billings Index did decline again last month making it now into a mini-trend of two downers in a row. The analysts think the election may have some bearing on that; I guess we’ll see. Overall though the metrics out there are solid as Dodge did their annual outlook conference and from the reports I have seen, they are still bullish on 2017/2018. I have been gathering those reports and will have some additional takes on that in next week's post. 
  • Last this week, amazingly this blog just celebrated its 11th anniversary. Every time I note a milestone, I seriously get more blown away that I’m still plugging along and this thing is still alive. Anyway, I thank you for following along and putting up with me every week. It still is my therapy, and while my content has surely changed (I’m much more kind), I hope you can find at least a nugget or two worthwhile each week. Thanks again for reading; I truly appreciate it!

 

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

GlassBuild America 2016 is now in the books and it truly did not disappoint. The combination of a great economic climate and a well-organized tradeshow made for three incredible days for our industry. There’s a lot to cover, so here goes.

First, this show once again proved that these events work. The networking is huge and the education crucial. Missing it is simply not an option. One of the overall takeaways was that people are either expanding their equipment needs, upgrading them or both. The action at all of the machinery booths was impressive. And keep in mind, the Las Vegas show is not really known for its equipment set up--that’s the Atlanta one--so this really was a big happening. 

The diversity of products on the floor was strong. One glazing company owner told me of a story about seeing a process at GlassBuild that solved a major product need he had, and he had no idea the process existed until he saw it at the show. That was awesome. Also, software options for every aspect of our industry really took a step forward this year, in my opinion. 

Overall attitude of the attendees was positive and the exhibitors really raised their game this year with even more booths that were eye catching and smart. More on that below. If there were any concerns it was the upcoming election, the circus that it is, and the potential negative effect on the economy, but that was it. 

Last on this, the rumor mill was surely churning. Some massive moves will most likely be busting open in the next several weeks, though with our industry, you just never know. But that added some more spice to it all.

As I do every year, here are some thoughts on what I liked, who I saw, who I missed and more…

  • I liked the LAMATEK approach with their booth a ton. They went with the “voting” theme, and it was smart and creative. I also liked Smart Builder offering free cups of coffee. Speaking of beverages, so many exhibits had beverage service and party-like atmospheres, who needed an expensive Vegas club? I thought the Vitro/PPG booth was outstanding. Rob Struble continues to be one of the sharpest guys in our industry. And I have to give props to everyone who did a great job being social on Twitter, but special recognition to FeneTech and their program. Really fun stuff there and kudos to Ron Crowl and team. And once again, the team from Salem Distributing rocked the best shirts. That’s becoming old news, but a special mention to Paul Knadler of Arizona Shower Doors who had a shirt the same color as my crazy media vest. That one was something to see!
  • From the people side, I saw so many people that I had not seen in years. My past lives were all intersecting constantly. The most fun was seeing Mike and Joyce Cully of United Plate Glass. Unless I am crazy, the last time I saw them is when they came to my wedding… in 1994! That was cool and neither of them has aged a day. Also seeing past coworkers like Tom Olson, Joe Marini, Jeff Kirby, Wardi Bisharat, Mike Dishmon, Kevin Heim, and of course the great Dave Michaeli (you know the should-be NFL hall of famer if his knees held up) was incredibly cool. Amazingly they were all nice to me too after all these years. Speaking of nice, it's hard to top people like Stanley Yee of Dow Corning and Urmilla Sowell of GANA; just good folks for sure.
  • It was a miracle to see Michael Frett of MyGlassTruck.com after he had the most adventurous trip to Vegas. The story is so amazing; it needs to be saved for another post!
  • I always enjoy running into folks like Tom O’Malley and getting updates on his world. Good to hear that Clover Architectural is doing super out there. Tom Herron of NFRC is a gentleman, and I give him tons of credit for putting up with me always whining, complaining, etc. I rarely get to see the folks from Glass 3 Enterprises, but when I do it’s always a pleasure. Good to see Paul DeGray who probably hopes I never pick the Rangers to win anything ever again. And speaking of sports, I am happy for guys like Mark Silverberg whose Indians are in the World Series. Catching up with Mark was overdue and quite important to me. 
  • Meeting new people at these events is also a high for me, and this time there are two of note. Bill Pollock of Northwest Glass in Montana chased me down and introduced himself. That was incredibly nice. Also new for me was Tony Montez of Montez Glass. What an impressive guy and fun to catch up on the world of glazing in Northern California. Though, Tony noted he’s never read my blog, so that means I need to work on adding audience in the west, obviously! 
  • I also love other marketing and PR folks that are crazy talented. Getting to see my good friend Rich Porayko doing his thing at the highest level was a pleasure. Shawn Donovan is always ahead of the curve, so getting to just chat with him for a few minutes was tremendous. Heather West is one of the best in her craft, so catching up with her is meaningful to me in hopes that her talent may rub off on me some day! 
  • I missed a ton of people since the show was so busy. People that I wanted to see and chat with like the great Shelly Farmer of SC Railing and of course good pal Garret Henson of Viracon. Hopefully next time I’ll get to run into you guys. I would’ve also liked to have seen rep extraordinaire Margaret Brune but missed her too as well as the folks from Gardner Glass Products. I got to see old pal Jim Ventre for a split second, but not long enough to catch up that is for sure.

Now we put this one into the books and look forward to the next. Time to keep moving our business and industry forward!

Read on for links and video of the week... 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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