CBSA says there's no evidence of injurious dumping of unitized wall modules from China in Canadian market

Glass Magazine
October 2, 2012
COMMERCIAL, FABRICATION : BUSINESS

The Canada Border Services Agency terminated its investigation into the alleged dumping and subsidizing of certain unitized wall modules from China, saying "the evidence does not disclose a reasonable indication that the dumping and subsidizing of the subject goods have caused injury or retardation or are threatening to cause injury," in a September 17 release.

The agency began the investigation this July, following a complaint filed by Allan Window Technologies, Ferguson Neudorf Glass Inc., Flynn Canada Ltd., Inland Glass & Aluminum Ltd., Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope, Sota Glazing Inc., Starline Architectural Windows Ltd. and Toro Aluminum. The companies alleged that the dumping and subsidizing of these goods were harming Canadian production by causing lost sales, price erosion, price suppression, reduced profitability, loss of market share, reduced employment and underutilization of capacity, according to a CBSA release.

In the United States, the U.S. International Trade Commission instituted antidumping and countervailing duties on aluminum extrusion products from China in April 2011. The action followed a Department of Commerce investigation that determined 29 Chinese companies dumped some $500 million worth of extruded aluminum products into the U.S. market in 2010. While the tariffs apply to Chinese aluminum extrusions, they do not apply to finished merchandise containing these aluminum extrusions, which in the case of the glazing industry, could include products such as unitized curtain wall or assembled shower doors. Read more about the U.S. antidumping and countervailing duties, and their effect on the industry, here.