Decorative glass products wow attendees at glasstec

Sahely Mukerji
October 24, 2008
COMMERCIAL, FABRICATION : MEETINGS AND EVENTS

In addition to decorative glass booths that look like pieces of art, stunning decorative glass panels—painted, acid-etched, silk-screened, sand-blasted and more--surround the glass technology symposium area at glasstec, Dusseldorf, Germany. Exhibits in the area include a glass bridge, a glass table with a Porsche sitting on it; a glass bench with circular bottom prints; LED displays; and various other striking shiners.

Among the head-turning booths are: Cricursa. Made of low-iron, extra clear bubble glass with colored interlayers the booth has standard framing. “None of the panels in this booth are rectangular or have four sides,” said Joan Tarrus, director, Cricursa, Spain. “They all have clean, soft acid-etch treatment.” The booth signifies what the company can do, he said. “Our product is concepts,” he said. “We back the best architects of the world, challenge applications and offer customized architectural solutions and technology.” The company introduced Crimar, glass bonded to marble, at the show.

Dekormat, Spain, has another beautiful booth. Resembling a house made of various colorful and engraved panels, the booth stands out in the hall. The company produces ceramic painted glass that can be tempered or laminated, said Maria Trigueros, representative. “We can do any color and any design in 3 millimeter to 10 mm thickness and 2550-mm-by-3210-mm measurement,” she said. “Colored glass is selling a lot in Europe. Backsplash and glass worktops are popular. The popular colors are black, white, red, burgundy, green and metals.” The company introduced Dia y Noche glass for facades at the show. Made of low-iron glass, the product can be tempered and has ceramic dots on both sides, white on one and black on the other. So one can’t see through from the outside but can see out from the inside, she said.

OmniDecor of Italy has a booth with decorative glass on three sides. The company is developing a new DecorFlou collection by a Turkish designer, Defner Koz, said Domenico Tanera. Two of the five lines of the new collection, Fuzzy and Laurel, were displayed at the booth. The design is acid-etched, comes in 4 millimeter to 12 millimeter thicknesses and 79 inches by 126 inches in size, he said. “In Italy, patterns from the 1960s are coming back,” he said. “Acid-etching is popular. Black, white, brown and bronze are the popular colors. In the U.S., low-iron, extra clear glass is popular.”

Edgetech I.G. of Cambridge, Ohio, has a sample fanlight from the Sheikh Zayed Mosque, Abu Dhabi, UAE, at the entrance of its booth. The sample, 70 percent of the size of the original fanlight of a sliding door at the mosque driven by four motors, is made of glass mosaic and UV curing adhesive.

Decorative glass is constantly evolving, said John Faour, president, Faour Glass, Tampa, Fla., who was walking the floors. The size of the decorative glass panels coming out these days impressed him. “The capability to produce [decorative] glass as large as 50 feet is novel,” he said. The other aspect that struck him is the reduction of metal components. “The seele bridge display, for instance, has no metal fittings. The floor and the side panels are bonded together.”

The show started Oct. 21 and will end tomorrow.