Great Glazing: The Woolwich School

The basics: Maine's Woolwich School recently underwent a $16.2 million renovation to provide for larger, daylit classroom spaces. Daylighting studies have shown that high levels of daylight in schools increase attendance and achievement rates, reduce fatigue and improve health, according to a release from Unicel Architectural. To maximize daylighting while avoiding issues of glare and heat gain, the building features a number of sun-control products. The daylighting solution included a cafeteria curtain wall, windows, sunshades, and a three-floor classroom curtain wall, complete with insulating glass units with integrated cord-free louvers and an exterior sunshading solution.

The players: Architect, Lewis + Malm; general contractor,  Ledgewood Construction; glazing contractor,  Oakes & Parkhurst; curtain wall, integrated louver and sunshade supplier, Unicel Architectural
 
The glass and systems: The cafeteria incorporates 36 Vision Control units with 10-millimeter low-emissivity glass on both sides of a 2.5-inch airspace, glazed into Unicel’s clear anodized curtain wall. Windows include 24 Vision Control units with 6 mm low-E glass on both sides of a 2-inch airspace, glazed into operable sashes. The building also features 90 Vision Control units with 6 mm low-E glass on both sides of a 2-inch airspace, glazed into Unicel’s clear anodized three-story classroom curtain wall. Monitors automatically turn off electrical lights when enough sunlight has permeated interior spaces to conserve energy. The building has 36 exterior outrigger sunshades, extending 3 feet beyond the face of the building, spanning all three floors. Each is composed of 4-inch louvers angled at 45 degrees.