glassblog

Monday, October 14, 2019

Technology continuously advances to improve energy efficiency, to enhance occupant safety and to make new building practices like modular construction possible. Although the basic methods for installing fenestration systems have remained consistent, many installation methods have also changed with the use of new technology.

Proper installation of fenestration is one of the simplest, yet often overlooked ways to guarantee the highest performance of a building over its lifetime. It is important that as new technologies are introduced, contractors and installers alike continue to stay up to date on the latest installation methods.

It is uncommon to hear about a properly installed wall system “failing.” When problems do arise, it can often be traced back to incorrect installation. As you know, re-work can be expensive, time consuming and frustrating.

Take these simple steps to reduce re-work and ensure proper installation:

  • Download the most current installation instructions and read them.
  • Supply the installer with a copy of the installation instructions.
  • Download an installation checklist specific to the system being installed.
  • When installing a system for the first time, contact the manufacturer to see if they offer on-site training.
  • Call the company representative to clarify anything that is not clear.
  • Install all components no matter how minor they appear. They were designed for a particular purpose and not installing may cause the system to not control air, water, or dead/windload correctly.

Installation is a big piece of the puzzle in ensuring a project’s success. Proper installation can avoid issues both simple and complex. By paying attention to the installation and advising installers from the start, we can ensure the highest levels of performance over the life of a building.

Steve Schohan is a marketing and communications manager at YKK AP America, where he develops marketing strategies and leads research efforts on emerging markets and trends, with an emphasis on driving industry product evolution and innovation.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors. 

Monday, October 14, 2019

For this week’s post, a different approach…

In October of 2005 I decided to get into the world of blogging. My first main post started with:

What I think is the first ever BLOG related to the glass and aluminum industry is now alive! If someone else has one, then by all means I apologize.

We have a good industry, but we face huge hurdles.

I started this as a way to get information out to the masses in a non-traditional way. I hope that I can spark debate and eventually help the industry win the battles it faces.

If you would’ve told me 14 years ago that I would still be blogging and how different my professional career turned out, well, I would’ve told you that you’re crazy. But here we are blogging away, and so thank you to all of you who have followed me through the years. I truly appreciate it.

Back in 2005 our industry was quite different—a lot of major brands that were powerhouses then don’t exist now. Technology was getting better and better but nowhere like today and we surely weren’t much of a global industry then with regards to source and supply. Standing here in 2019 we are in a much better place in so many ways and that is something that I am personally and professionally grateful for.

As I think everyone who knows me knows, I do love the glass industry and I love what we do and how we do it. It wasn’t always like that—I had zero desire to be in the business growing up or all the way through college and early into my professional life. (My family has been in the glass business since 1898). But, my brother once told me that glass is in my blood—so blame goes to him that I am here—and he was right. 

My mission for this blog hasn’t changed much since 2005. I still want to get info out and get people fired up, and I still believe this is therapeutic for me in that I can get things off my chest. Obviously I am not as rough and militant as I was years ago, but I think mellowing was the right call for many reasons. Though I know there are old school readers of this that would love for me to revert back, sorry can’t do that! 

So, where I am going with all of this? Well, it’s a look back but this is also a plea to all who read this to continue to push for the betterment of the industry. Get involved and stay involved. Get to the shows and conferences. Educate and communicate. And push our products to the forefront of the building product world. Many of you already do this, and do it extremely well, but if you don’t, I’m asking you look at 2020 as the chance to really make that difference.

I have 14 years of this in the books, this is post No. 770, and I’m going to keep pushing until I hopefully hit 1,000 at least. Thank you again for joining me on this ride. Next week we’ll get back to the traditional industry scuttlebutt and we’ll finish 2019 strong! 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. 

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors. 

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

The glass industry gathered in Milan, Italy, last week for Vitrum 2019, the international glass machinery trade show, held Oct. 1-4. Check out photos from the show. 

Monday, October 7, 2019

I have covered this before, but it’s worth mentioning again. I often I hear from people that ask “How can I get more involved in the industry?” Well, if you want to be active and make a difference, first step is to make sure you are a member of National Glass Association and then pay attention to the call for actions. To give you a flavor, this is a portion of one from last week and these are huge subjects that need attention. Step up and get involved!

Advocacy Committee

Advocacy Response Team
Become equipped to advocate for glass and glazing at the legislative and regulatory levels; more information to follow.

Fabricating Committee

Fire-rated Glazing capabilities
This task group will review the existing text within the Glazing Manual in order to update the description to include the cross-functional uses of fire-rated glazing for purposes such as energy performance or protective glazing.

Vacuum Insulating Glazing

The existing task group initiated a survey at Fall Conference to guide the development on a resource educating the industry on VIG products and capabilities.

Evaluating Post-Finishing of Heat-Treated Glass Edges

Task group will develop and test control samples to destruction in order to develop recommended guidelines for post-finishing. 

If interested in volunteering, contact Sara Neiswanger at NGA, or if you have questions just drop me a line.

Elsewhere…

  • Also from the NGA world, the latest nominees for the board of directors were announced and two of my all-time favorites were on the slate. Ron Crowl of Fenetech and Jim Stathopoulos of Ajay Glass are on the ballot and simply tremendous people. Brilliant businessmen, class acts, and they truly care about this industry. I hope they win so they can be added to the board and continue to advance our industry. 
  • Positive news from Harmon with naming of Troy Johnson as president starting in March of 2020. I don’t know Troy that well—I shared a spot on the BEC planning committee last year with him and came away extremely impressed. That, along with a lot of very influential people being major fans of his is good enough for me. Congrats Troy!
  • You know I love when glass gets good mentions in the “real world” and so I was thrilled in my own stupid way when the TV show “This Is Us” had a discussion on getting windows, including the line “Double pane windows—the sexiest style of windows!” I probably would have passed out if they called them IGU’s. Anyway, nice to hear a product we all know and love in the middle of a popular TV show.
  • Right now the hottest segment going is interiors and this year the Glass Magazine Reader Photo Contest will be focused on that area, with a look at the exceptional interiors in our world. If you have pictures of innovative interior glass applications, including decorative installations, glass floors, doors, walls, stairs, partitions and more click this link and review the rules and get entered into this awesome contest. Deadline is Oct. 11.
  • Last this week: interesting debate on the possible end of the American “dream home.” Communities with the idea to push more multi-unit housing vs. allowing single family homes. This article on what is happening in Minnesota gives you a good jumping off point. There is no doubt that we have to keep evolving in many areas of our world, but this angle has people ready to battle on both sides and rightfully so—lots to take in.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. 

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.