glassblog

Monday, April 9, 2018

If the June 2014 issue of Sports Illustrated ever landed on your desk, chances are good you either laughed or said “yea, right” when you read the cover story about the Houston Astros: “An Unprecedented Look at How a Franchise is Going Beyond Moneyball to Build the Game’s Next Big Thing…Your 2017 World Series Champs.” The Astros’ performance drought had been well advertised.  I’m not a baseball guy, and even I knew they were bad.

How could this team make the World Series, let alone win it?

The answer lay with the approach. When Jeff Luhnow came on board as the Houston Astros’ general manager in 2011, he knew fans expected a quick turning of the ship. A record close to .500 seemed attainable, and would allow them to watch a fair amount of wins. But, Luhnow and analyst Sig Mejdal decided to focus on the long-term win instead of a more immediate and respectable record. They avoided expensive free agents, put more resources into their farm system, traded away some of their most mature assets, and developed a controversial analytics-based approach to drafting players.

The initial cost for the duo’s approach was high. The Astros lost game after game, some of which received local TV ratings of 0.0. By 2013, their record of 51-111 was the worst in franchise history and tied for the majors’ worst in a decade. But in 2017, their strategy paid off. The Houston Astros won the World Series.

Thinking beyond the immediate win isn’t easy, not in baseball or in the glass industry. To get the job done, we are often focused on landing the next project or getting the next shipment out on time. There are always pressing matters competing for our attention. Looking beyond these urgent needs to reevaluate internal processes, reconfigure programs, shift employee roles and make other beneficial changes takes time and resources. Since the initial investment is high and we are already busy, we don’t take action. But, like the Astros, the pay-off for strategic, long-term adjustments can far outweigh the initial cost.

A recent example at TGP took place during the build out of some of our machining programs. To effectively build out the new program, we had to shift engineering resources normally used for shop drawings and reallocate them to machining for a one-month period.

It was a major effort to manage these resources. Did we experience short-term discomfort during this period? Yes. But, the net-gain is expected to be huge. To put it into perspective, it would have taken two engineers and one programmer over a year and a half at one day per week to complete the same amount of work that our team was able to test, verify and program during that one-month timeframe. It also left our team in a great situation for those specific machining programs going forward. Perhaps more importantly, it reminded me of the value of thinking beyond the here and now, of experiencing a little discomfort for a bigger gain.

So, my question for you is this: are you thinking beyond the immediate win?  

David Vermeulen is the national sales manager for Technical Glass Products (TGP), a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. TGP works closely with architects, designers and other building professionals, providing them with the state-of-the-art products, service and support to maximize design aesthetics and safety in commercial and institutional buildings around the world. Contact him at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, April 9, 2018

I am always studying trends and directions that our world will go into, and when I come across lists that interest me I love to share them here. This week I ran into a great piece on the TMD Studio blog that broke down the future of design and architecture. Of course, I had some comments on the list of trends.

Check them out.

  • Collaboration. There is no doubt that this area is growing, and the article did not mention integrated project delivery, which is absolutely a growing movement.

  • VR and Immersive Architecture. VR and AR are both items that benefit design teams. As that technology grows, so will the usage. Residential glass shops are already seeing value, but costs are still very high to use.

  • BIM. Is this the future? Isn’t it here and hasn’t it been here for a while? The article does do a good job of explaining the situation here.

  • Parametric Architecture. This is intense and deep; too much for my little brain.

  • Robots and 3D printers. To me this is the best bet for massive usage in the future. I believe we will see more robotics in our world in many different areas.

  • Internet of Spaces. I have heard of Internet of Things, but I can’t say I remember this concept and when I read more I just don’t see it… yet.

  • Vertical Cities. Isn’t New York a pro at this at this point?

  • Sustainability. It is listed as a trend, but I think it’s beyond a “trend” and more an accepted practice for most. 

If you are an architectural geek, the whole article is very interesting, though in some areas it’s deeper than I like to go. Still, it is worth the discussion of where we are now and where we are going.

Elsewhere…

  • Speaking of items that fall under “trends,” there’s been a push for timber as a curtain wall framing product. It’s evidently popular in Europe. However, a job in Oregon that was going with wood all over the project instead of conventional products had a rough go recently. This could surely slow momentum.

  • Last week, I hit on the awesome map that Glass Magazine included in its latest issue, and it reminded me of the site WorldofGlassMap.com. Tremendous site and if you are a member of the NGA, it is free with your membership. 

  • Hearing rumblings of a couple of mid-size glass company acquisitions in the industry, one on the eastern side of the country and one on the west. I think we will see a few more of these sorts of deals over the next two years with the way the industry landscape is lining up. I don't see the major monster deals happening, though. See I just did it. Watch, some massive deal will be announced tomorrow! In any case, with the economy showing some extra volatility, it could move people off the fence and into “sell” mode.

  • Last this week, the musical artist Zedd did all of the design for his gigantic home and he used tons of glass throughout. As an industry we really do make, fabricate and install an awesome product. Take a look at what he did, and obviously not only does he have musical skills but he is not a bad designer either!

Read on for links and video of the week…

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, April 2, 2018

My company has been a sponsor for the Women in Design & Construction event, a leadership conference for women—of all roles, fields and career stages—within the construction industry. My experience at these conferences made me reflect more on women in the workplace. With women making up 57 percent of the labor force, according to the Department of Labor’s website, it is pretty clear that women are here to stay. And, a recent study published in the Harvard Business Review showed that “as more women joined the workforce, they helped make cities more productive and increased wages” for both men and women (between 1980 and 2010).

How can the glass industry attract and retain the most promising female workers?

I wanted to explore this from the perspective of an emerging female professional in our industry, so I reached out to Sabrina Kanaley, an architectural representative from Crawford-Tracey Corp. While pursuing a degree in Information Technology, she used her semester breaks to intern at Crawford-Tracey.

“I walked through the door with absolutely zero concept and understanding of glass, glazing and construction,” she says. “I dove right in, absorbing all the knowledge I could and along the way I realized I was developing a passion for this industry and this job.”

After graduating from college, she returned to Crawford-Tracey because of this passion, which is apparent from her explanation of her job role.

“Though I’m an architectural rep, I’ve really got my hands in many ‘cookie jars.’ I work closely with the president of CTC in our design assist department. We collaborate with our engineering and drafting team to put together project specific system details and takeoffs, which we then provide to architects and GCs interested in utilizing our system as their basis of design. I also work closely with our director of sales and estimating and I frequently estimate projects that I’ve worked on since the schematic design phase.”

As someone fairly new and developing a real passion for her work, Sabrina’s perspective on what would  incentivize her to stay and grow in this industry is interesting.

“Truly, I would like to see not only myself, but more women in roles of leadership and management. Gender needs to stop being a decision factor. Work ethic, qualifications, education and performance need to be recognized and rewarded accordingly.”

When asked what the glass industry can do to attract more women, she said, “networking is a must. The glass industry needs to make itself known. Partner with universities, be present during career days and offer intern programs for college students. Start making more of an effort, be bold and show women that there is a place for them in this industry; give them a reason to be interested!”

Sabrina’s story is not unique. There are many talented and hardworking women in our industry who thrive in their roles when given the opportunity. It is up to us as an industry to encourage women to choose the glass industry—and decide to stay.

Diana San Diego is vice president of marketing for Safti First. Contact her at dianas@safti.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Every month I review the latest Glass Magazine and I am always excited to learn something new. As always, the knowledge growth was there, but the amount of insight in this latest edition is stunning. The March issue is the annual Top Glass Fabricators edition and it’s loaded from start to finish. The first major takeaway is that it comes with a pull-out map of the 2018 Top Glass Fabricators. It is old school and awesome and I am sure now hanging in glass shops and glazing operations throughout North America. Next is the rundown and detail of the Top Glass Fabricators. I always enjoy the project profiles that come with it. I mentioned last week the fabulous Vitrum Glass Group job and that was joined by several other amazing pieces of fabrication. Add in the details of some of the poll questions and you get excellent visibility into the world of the fabricator. In addition, this issue had outstanding pieces on buying a tempering furnace from a finance point of view, an incredible interview with Jeff Razwick of TGP on his deal with Allegion, and a nice piece on glass in health care. And selfishly, I was pretty excited to be included in a superb piece by Olivia Parker on best booth practices for trade shows. Overall, a tremendous issue. Please make sure you check it out!

Elsewhere…

  • Ad of the month was a tough one yet again. Lots of companies really raising their game with creative pieces, but the winner was Consolidated Glass Holdings and its “line card” ad that was included in the issue in a special way: it was on thicker stock that was attached to another page, so that immediately caught my eye. And then the info on there was very in-depth. Nice work, and congrats to Angela Beach at CGH to make that all happen!

  • While I am talking about good detail and insight, I need to give credit to Rob Struble and the team at Vitro on their email blasts. Their “Vitro Glass Insider” consistently delivers quick and helpful education. I know we all get tons of emails, and it’s tough to stand out, but they do with this approach.

  • It looks like the AIA show is following the lead of Greenbuild by pushing celebrity approaches and concert settings with the news that DJ and musician Questlove will be featured at their opening party. If you watch the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, Questlove is his musical leader and is pretty well-known in the musical space. Whether this helps the always-frustrating issue of a lack of architects on the floor and in your booth remains to be seen…

  • For my friends in eastern Canada, are you attending Top Glass later this month? Looks like a solid day of education and information. Two guys that I am a big fan of will be on stage. Cody Thomas of Glass Renu will be there talking on glass restoration and Chris Fronsoe of ICD Coatings will be breaking down the spandrel world. So those sessions and others will make it a good one overall.

  • Last this week, it is now baseball season and while I don’t follow the day-to-day happenings as close as I used to, I still enjoy the sport and it always signals the beginning of an awesome sporting stretch. Baseball opening, NHL and NBA playoffs, NFL Draft, College Spring Football, The Masters, and the Indy 500. Lots of great distractions from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Oh, and just for the heck of it, for baseball I’m going Yankees to win it all. That lineup is pretty awesome.

Read on for links and video of the week…

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, March 26, 2018

Window Safety Week, held next week, is observed to heighten the awareness of what parents and caregivers should do to help keep their family and visitors safer from the risks of window falls or injuries in their home, as well as how they can use their windows for emergency escape and rescue purposes.

While everyone in our industry knows that window safety is important year-round, this is a great opportunity to think about how your company can promote safety and to get crucial information out to your customers. There are many tools and resources available to you and your company to educate your customers about what it means to practice window safety.

The Window Safety Task Force developed the 2018 Window Safety Week Tool Kit to help get companies started. The tools and tips in the kit are for use not only during Window Safety Week, but all year. It contains materials to promote window safety awareness in your own company, including an email template for company employees, as well as tips regarding window safety to share with employees and customers.

Other elements in the kit that help company’s spread the word to customers are an article for your company newsletter or announcement, and social media information and sample posts. It’s also geared to share with family, friends, community, club or service organizations, and the local media with information on why Window Safety Week is so important and even a sample letter-to-the-editor. To help teach children about window safety, an activity book is available from the task force, as well as additional information for parents and caregivers.

Though Window Safety Week, observed annually every first full week in April, is an important reminder, window safety education should be ongoing. Readers can download the company kit here to help spread the word about Window Safety Week or visit AAMA’s Window Safety page for more information.

Angela Dickson is marketing and communications director for the American Architectural Manufacturers Association. Contact her at adickson@aamanet.org.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, March 26, 2018

While the volatility on the financial markets continues, I am still constantly monitoring the different indexes that track construction-related activities. I am also talking with folks every day about the “real time” feel for the marketplace. 

On the index side, the latest Architectural Billings Index continues to show positivity. With a score of 52, the index was on the plus side led by very strong efforts from the West and Midwest territories. The Dodge Momentum Index also showed plus numbers for last month, but just barely, registering only a ½ percent gain on the previous report. Still, while the numbers overall are in the right place some analysts are starting to fret that growth on the commercial side is showing some weaknesses. That is something to watch. Keep in mind, spending forecasts for commercial have been showing gains through 2020, so there is still quite a bit of optimism.

As for the “real time” feel, that has been on the pessimistic side for the most part. The market had some soft spots in February that I believe most figured would go away in March but have not. For current work, the horrendous weather in the Northeast has to be playing a part for that region. Backlogs for fourth quarter and first quarter 2019 are not where many want them to be either, so that is adding to the angst. I think since we all lived through those insane days of the previous recession, our fear mechanism is set to trigger faster than normal. Obviously, we’ll continue to watch and communicate.

Elsewhere…

  • I have written many times on Amazon. I am truly intrigued by that organization. Bloomberg recently took a pretty detailed look at Amazon and it’s absolutely worth the read. 

  • Speaking of Amazon, in the latest Glass Magazine (full review coming next week) there’s a profile on one of its new buildings in Seattle that was fabricated by Vitrum Glass Group. The building is a show stopper. Kudos to the team at Vitrum for a job well done as well as the folks at Walker Glass, Kuraray, Glass Coatings and Concepts, Vitro, and Walters and Wolf who all took part in this incredible project. Awesome work by all! Also, kudos to Viracon on the tower facade glass on the towers there. Nice job.

  • I find myself constantly interested in the “Internet of Things,” also known as IoT. Katy Devlin and Glass Magazine have had some excellent stories on it, and Ron Crowl and his team at Fenetech have been leaders in working to educate the industry and seeing where this movement can go. There is no doubt that more automation and IoT will be in modern glass fabrication plants. It’s just probably going to take a while. As for the mainstream side of IoT, there was an excellent piece on Full Measure News this past weekend that is worth the watch as well. 

  • By the way, I am a fan of Full Measure News. It comes out every Sunday with three or four stories and it’s really well done. In a world of some “interesting” news sites, this one has been pretty solid, in my opinion.

  • Last this week, I have written on modular building and how it’s growing. Now we have the news of an actual factory in Chicago to do modular only. Interesting read and also the comment at the end asking how the building permitting process will work is one that has me curious, too.

Read on for links and video of the week…

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, March 19, 2018

It's time to submit your company for consideration in Glass Magazine’s annual Top 50 Glaziers program. The June 2018 issue of Glass Magazine will feature the highest-earning contract glaziers of 2017.

The Top 50 Glaziers report recognizes leading North American glazing firms based on annual sales, and will include glazier profiles, industry statistics, project spotlights and more.

We want to feature the glass industry's achievements. In order for us to provide the most accurate and up-to-date information, we rely on direct submissions from the industry. If your company should be included in the Top 50 Glaziers report, please complete the nomination form. The submission deadline is March 30, 2018.

Please contact me with any questions or comments.

Norah Dick is the assistant editor of Glass Magazine. Contact her at ndick@glass.org.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Last week, my mega blog on the BEC missed a few nuggets, so I wanted to clean that up here. There were some additional pieces that I found newsworthy. As always, Dr. Tom Culp provides an update with extreme value as does Urmilla Jokhu-Sowell. First amongst the many nuggets from Tom was discussion on where the energy codes will go next. He listed four bullet points that I found relevant:

  • More high performance thermal breaks

  • More fourth surface low-emissivity, or triple glazing

  • More warm-edge spacers

  • Lower SHGC triple silvers in the south

For some of us, the thought of these things is exciting, and for some of us the thought is nauseating. For those sick to their stomachs, it’s coming, but you have a bit of time, so you may want to prepare. One thought I had is I wonder if moves like this will grow the vacuum insulating glass side in the commercial industry? Regardless, these are items to have on the radar.

Urmilla’s presentation did break down what’s happening on the technical side of NGA/GANA, and with the merged group some things will certainly change. But what will not is the desire to make sure the items that affect our industry the most will be addressed. I am excited to see how Urmilla and the technical side evolve and advance with the new set up.

Elsewhere….

  • I did run into Courtney Little of Ace Glass at BEC, but didn’t find out until after that he was just elected president of American Subcontractors Association. Courtney will be a great force there and he’s always been a tremendous person for insight for our industry. Congrats Courtney, and I hope to still see you at glass events even with your new responsibilities. 

  • Saw an interesting article this week that was promoting the “Tesla of Housing.” Basically, this was compared to the groundbreaking of Tesla vehicles and features a contractor specifically focused on advancing the energy efficiency in the housing market. The approach noted is basically Passive House, which is not new but still very good and important. Resistance in the United States has always been pretty strong, since we love our “McMansions,” so we’ll see if this developer can break that trend.

  • I do love the show Flip or Flop on HGTV, though I do believe the pricing that they assign to things is usually woefully low. Especially on shower enclosures. (Please, anyone who’s worked on that show with glass weigh in.) I find it very interesting to get into the minds of the players. And another show in that genre is “Fixer Upper” and from time to time Dustin Anderson of Anderson Glass plays a role. In the new episode that aired last Tuesday, Dustin had to fabricate a huge glass wall and install it on the third floor of an apartment building. The wall was weight bearing as well and Dustin and his team had to move materials up the old-fashioned way—through the stairwells! Overall, it was interesting to watch the players view what Dustin and his team did with amazement. Glass and glazing is so cool and so many don’t realize it. Kudos to Dustin for showing off what we do to the masses.

  • Last this week, my favorite show The Americans returns for its final season on March 28. Lots of loose ends to tie up and I simply can’t wait!

Read on for links and video of the week…

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Last week, more than 500 attendees gathered in Las Vegas for the 2018 Building Envelope Contractors Conference, the annual event targeted at providing in-demand industry education for glazing contractors. The conference, held March 4-6, drew leaders from across the industry—from glazing firms to glass fabricators to equipment suppliers and more. Glass Magazine interviewed a range of attendees about the health of the industry, the biggest challenge facing companies, the recent combination of the National Glass Association and the Glass Association of North America, and more.

Katy Devlin is editor in chief of Glass Magazine. Contact her at kdevlin@glass.org.

Monday, March 12, 2018

Another great BEC Conference is now in the books, and once again it was a major winner. Like the many I have attended previously, I left very fired up about what I learned and who I got to meet and spend time with. This year the attendee numbers were strong, with more than 500 there who were active, either in the conference area or in the mini trade show spot. This was the first year since those crazy pre-recession days that the numbers were that impressive. 

To recap, here’s what stuck out for me. 

Presentations 

  • The opening panel that featured leaders from the design, manufacturing, installation and contracting world was off the charts. It could have easily taken up the entire morning session, especially with quite a few questions that were still waiting in the queue. Lesson learned on the planning end: something that good needs more time. 

  • Tom Jackson, president of Steel Encounters, did an absolutely fantastic job on the world of employee relations, culture, and finding and retaining the workforce. He had one stat that I discussed with a lot of attendees and so I need to share here…

    “95% of job candidates believe culture is more important than compensation.”

    That still blows me away, but also shows I am old fashioned. The keynote (thanks to Guardian Glass and an inspired choice by Chris Dolan) addressed this topic. The speaker, Jeff Havens, provided an incredibly energetic and entertaining approach to generational differences in the workplace. And, my gosh, I am now officially old. 

  • Overall, the presentations were excellent with a ton of different subjects to satisfy so much of what the modern glazing contractor or installer could need. The technical meeting, chaired by the impressive Matt Kamper of Woodbridge Glass, was interesting. I always enjoy the ins and outs of it, but the fact that NFRC was covered in detail cracked me up. I have been in the NFRC mix since 2004! And we’re still talking about the same basic things. Just incredible, really. 

Networking

  • As always, the networking makes the event. The Sunday night reception was awesome. The room was jam-packed and when the reception ended it was still busy with the hotel management trying several different moves to get people to clear out. That is always the sign of a good party. And yes, I stayed ‘til the end. (That never, ever happens if you know me.)

  • Before I run into whom I visited, I have to give props to Gus Trupiano of AGC for leading this event as the chair of the BEC division. Gus is not only an excellent and classy man, he’s also a great leader who did the industry proud once again. Kudos as well to Sara Neiswanger of GANA/NGA for her tireless work on this. She does so much behind the scenes, and does it with great care and skill.

Familiar Faces 

  • It was fun to fly on a plane loaded with industry folks. Poor Joe Erb of Quanex got stuck in the middle seat next to me for 4 1/2 hours. He deserves a medal. Plus, the team from Guardian Glass was on board and I do sincerely enjoy chatting with them any chance I get. Once in Vegas it was great to see Bill Sullivan of Brin Glass. He’s a tremendous supporter of the industry and it is appreciated. In that same boat are people like Chuck Knickerbocker of TGP and Jon Kimberlain of Dow. I love what they do and getting a few minutes with each of them is a great honor for me.  

  • The talent on display at this event is really crazy. People like Gary McQueen of J.E. Berkowitz, Rob Carlson of Tristar and Ian Patlin of Paragon are so impressive to me. And my friend Shelly Farmer of Trex Commercial never disappoints. She’s always top of her game and doing great things. It’s well-known I am a fan of the Viracon guys Garret Henson, Seth Madole and Cameron Scripture. Brilliant and good people, too. 

  • Got to chat with Chris Knitter of Oahu Metal & Glazing for the first time in a few years and same with Maure Creager and Tim Finley of Sage Glass. (Side note: Sage has the coolest business cards. Props to Derek Malmquist on that.) I only see Tracy Robbins of Walters & Wolf at this event, and I am glad I always do, good guy! Running into a former co-worker of mine Wardi Bisharat of PRL was fantastic. She rocks as always.

  • Any time I get with the great Rich Porayko is a blessing for me. I got to tell the “how I met my wife” story to Bob Burkhammer of Giroux and his wonderful wife, and I spent some quality time with Bernard Lax of Pulp, which I value a ton. 

  • The event was so huge I did not see a lot of people I wanted to see. I barely saw Tim McGee of Glass Coatings and Concepts, and I missed Tom O’Malley of Clover Architectural completely. I so badly wanted to hear how great things are going for him, as I see Clover everywhere these days! I also missed visiting with the Vitro folks and missed a few opportunities to catch up with old friend Tim Moore of Standard Bent. 

New Faces, New Things

  • I like meeting new people and learning new things, too. It was great to meet Charles Alexander, the newest addition at Walker Glass (though saying goodbye to Marc Deschamps was VERY hard for me); and meeting Joffy Thompson and John Vissari of United Plate Glass was incredible. Good, sharp guys for sure. As for new things, I learned about the new, exciting unitized product from Kurt Levan and Joel Phelps of Entekk; that was very cool. Best of luck to them.

It’s now on to the next events. For me, it’s most likely GlassBuild America, as I do not think I am attending AIA. And I am very excited about GlassBuild based on the vibes just experienced at BEC. We have a lot of positivity flowing in our industry right now, so let’s keep at it!

Read on for links and video of the week…

The author is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.

E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com. The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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