From the Fabricator: MVP Season Begins

It’s that time of year that we start to look back, and for me that includes determining my annual glass industry MVP. In one month, with my last post for 2018, I will make the announcement of the runners up and the award winner. I have been recognizing people for this honor since 2013 (list of winners below), and it’s one of the most rewarding things I do. All the people that I name go above and beyond for this industry and represent our interests extremely well. 2018 has once again made it extremely challenging to choose a winner. Since I have been doing this, I have recognized 40 people, all of whom made major impacts. I am excited to point out five more next month. If you have someone (or a company) that you think deserves consideration, please drop me a line. Our past winners:

2013: Tracy Rogers

2014: C.R. Laurence

2015: Jon Kimberlain

2016: Chuck Knickerbocker

2017: Joe Erb

2018: To be announced in December

Elsewhere…

  • Reminders

  • I am behind, so my latest Glass Magazine review is for the “Robot Revolution” October issue. Obviously the recent glasstec event—and GlassBuild America before that—was a major showcase for robots and automation, so this issue from Glass Magazine was very timely and helpful. In-depth articles on maintenance, robots, and technology advancements were strong as was Marco Terry’s excellent piece on when to grow a business. Good stuff as always! My favorite ad of the month actually goes to GlassBuild America for their piece recognizing all of the sponsors at the show. All of these companies not only advanced their brand by sponsoring, but they also did right by the industry by supporting the effort. It was great to see them all listed on one page.

  • I have covered previously the race to be the host city for Amazon’s HQ2. That contest is over and apparently the winners were Long Island, New York and Arlington, Virginia. This was stunning given cost of living, traffic, etc. in those areas. Those choices have not gone over well publicly, as some of the tenets that everyone expected from Amazon when it started the search were not considered in the end. 

    Will Oremus, tech columnist at Slate, summed it up well with this tweet:

    “I know I'm late to this, but the reason Amazon's HQ2 was a farce is not just that they picked two cities. It's that they raised the hopes of cities across the country that could really use an infusion of economic vitality, then picked the two that need it least of all.”

    That really nails it. Why have 300 communities do this when this is where you end up? In any case, Amazon also now has detailed planning information on every city in the United States, deep intel really, that I am sure they will utilize to keep growing. From a business side, it was brilliant. From a human side, it left me cold. 

  • Check out the design of this building. I sure hope when it comes to the engineering someone really smart like John Wheaton is involved, because looking at this blows my mind.

  • Last this week, note there is no blog from me next week as we head into the Thanksgiving holiday. As I have noted here many times, Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday and I can’t wait to enjoy it yet again. But even more so this year: we need to give thanks for what we have and take heed that it does not last forever. Life can be short, time absolutely flies, so next week, when you gather with your friends and family, take it all in a little deeper. Thank you.

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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