From the Fabricator: Start of the MVP Process

As I mentioned on my last post, it is Glass Industry MVP Season. The first step is looking back at the past before noting who will be recognized this year. I have been acknowledging people as leaders in one form or another since 2007, but the formal declaration of MVP started in 2013. The past winners are:

  • 2013: Tracy Rogers

  • 2014: C.R. Laurence

  • 2015: Jon Kimberlain

  • 2016: Chuck Knickerbocker

Each year there are usually five to seven runners-up and, as you can tell from above, an individual or a company can be the winner. The race so far in 2017 has been incredibly difficult. There are so many remarkable people who work hard for their companies and also give back to the industry. And there are some companies as a whole that collectively care a ton about making our space a better place. Choosing gets more and more challenging every year. Overall, I have recognized a total of 35 people since 2007, and five are no longer in the industry, including, sadly, the late great Greg Carney. So, who’s on tap for this year? It’s coming soon.

Elsewhere…

I’m light on glass industry-related stuff this week, so in some other areas that interest me…

  • In this world of ugly news and despicable human behavior there are some truly first class people. One of them is Marine Veteran Rob Jones. Rob lost both of his legs in Afghanistan in 2010, but that has not stopped him from doing what I would consider superhuman tasks to raise awareness and money for veterans’ causes. The most recent was running (with prosthetics) 31 marathons in 31 cities in 31 days. A lot of us travel a ton in this industry and just doing several cities a week can wear you down. Now can you imagine running a marathon at each? The guy is amazing. This article is one of many that gives some insight to Rob, who I have been so fortunate to meet thanks to his work with veteran charity the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes, which actually has a glass industry connection as it’s run by former NGA VP David Walker. Check it out and be thankful we still have great people in our universe.

  • Back to another list, this time the Top 10 Most “Sprawling” Cities according to the website Smart Growth America. Quite frankly I was stunned by some of these cities that made the list, as according to the study too much growth is not good. Honestly, I am not sure if I understand or agree but here goes…

  1. Hickory, North Carolina
  2. Atlanta
  3. Clarksville, Tennessee-Kentucky
  4. Prescott, Arizona
  5. Nashville, Tennessee
  6. Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  7. Inland Empire, California
  8. Greenville, South Carolina
  9. Augusta, Georgia-South Carolina
  10. Kingsport, Tennessee-Virginia

The complete study is here for those of you’re interested in this sort of thing. 

  • Las Vegas launched a self-driving shuttle and on its first day it got into an accident. Evidently it was the human driver in another car that was at fault, but still I just can’t feel any trust or faith in this sort of arrangement. Too many things can go wrong and I am really amazed at the time, money and effort that are going into this technology. 

  • Last this week, is it me or is the amount of spam email going up dramatically? I go into my spam folders every other day or so to just make sure I am not missing something, and I am flat out amazed at the volume in there. Most of it is really obvious spam, but where I really feel bad is for those less sophisticated on email who probably get this junk in their main folder and fall for a scam or two. 

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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