From the Fabricator: Watching for What's Next

The many industry gatherings in recent weeks lent themselves to the incubation of rumors. Being connected to the industry in the odd ways I am, I get to hear many of these. Most are of the outlandish variety, but some eventually happen. In any case, the scuttlebutt continues to grow regarding newer foreign players coming to the United States to set up fabrication plants. These rumors started a year ago during glasstec and have gained more ground throughout the year. It bears watching if the current busy market attracts new players. Plus, it poses the question about whether these newcomers will pursue greenfield opportunities or acquisitions. It’s a sellers’ market right now, so I would not be shocked if we see the former happen. My fearless prediction is you will see someone new hitting a major market in the next 6 to 9 months.

Elsewhere…

  • Thank you to everyone in the industry who signed the Section 179 petition. It was a bunch of you and good to see. The petition passed the 10K mark this week, and the effort continues to encourage Congress to look at this piece and roll it back to where it should be. 
  • I have been following the new Apple headquarters closely, and this week renderings were released for another major Apple campus building in Silicon Valley. This one is a clover leaf shaped complex that will cover 18 acres. HOK is the designer, and it will feature a lot of glass—a lot of it large and bent. Plus there’s some thought that Apple may try to push for Net Zero on this complex, which would be an amazing accomplishment. So, expectation of a heavy dose of solar is surely a possibility. 
  • Before we leave the state of California, I read a comical piece this week in the New York Times on electric cars and the battles that come with them—mainly, the areas and spaces necessary to charge them up. People are getting fired up as the cars and technology are outpacing areas to service and charge. It’s a great read and shows that sometimes disruptive technology still has a long way to go with support and consideration. Personally, I see frustration and arguments over electrical outlets all the time, particularly at the busy airports I frequent. 
  • Poll time. So, what are the most energy efficient and least energy efficient states? A new survey by WalletHub outlined the rankings by analyzing efficiency of car and home energy consumption as part of the process. (Note, the study covered the continental U.S. only).

    Most Efficient:
    1. New York (Color me stunned on this one)
    2. Vermont
    3. Minnesota (I actually figured this would be No. 1, thanks to brilliant people like Kerry Haglund being so active there)
    4. Wisconsin
    5. Utah

    Least Efficient:
    44. Arkansas
    45. Kentucky
    46. Texas
    47. Louisiana
    48. South Carolina

    So, South Carolina is the least energy efficient state according to this particular piece. I guess, aside from being a tough state to get hurricane protection codes enforced, S.C. is also tough in terms of energy.

    I am in shock after the end of the Michigan-Michigan State game. What a wild finish to a pretty intriguing football game. I love college football. Congrats to my many State fans out there, and I feel for my UofM folks.

    Last this week. For those of you with a retail arm, do yourself a favor and check out this article about Angie’s List. If you provide a service to the public, you likely have been inundated and guilted by the heavy sales pitch from these folks, and this story gives some insight on why. I have to give credit to the people behind this service. They have found a way to make some good money without the effort of producing the product. 

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications. E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.
 
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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