glassblog

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

LinkedIn, the online professional networking tool, was a topic of two workshops I gave at the American Architectural Manufacturers Association 2017 National Fall Conference this week. Even if you’re not currently job-hunting, you should care about the state of your current LinkedIn profile. It’s always good to see what’s happening in your industry, how companies and roles are changing and who in your network might just be perfect for an opportunity on your radar.

If you’re looking for a new position, it’s even more important that a profile is up-to-date. A 2016 Jobvite survey found that 87 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn to vet candidates. 

You are your own brand, and you need to be your biggest advocate for that brand.

So, make sure you have a good profile picture (there are plenty of examples of bad ones), and include your volunteer work and other interests on your profile. You also need to review your LinkedIn account settings that allow users to view the profile pages of others without detection. Keep competitors from your poaching client lists.

Keep your account safe. Change your password every few months and opt into two-step verification to add an additional level of user authentication. 

With two-step verification, LinkedIn will text you a security code to enter along with your password. This is also a great suggestion for you to use with platforms like Gmail, Facebook, Twitter and other tools.

If you missed the LinkedIn workshops, an AAMA webinar covering the topic will be held December 12. This event is open to the public and registration is free. AAMA’s next social media workshop will focus on Twitter, which will take place at the AAMA Annual Conference in 2018. Hope to see you there! 

Meryl Williams is the Communications Coordinator for AAMA. She produces national and regional newsletters, writes editorial content and helps lead AAMA’s social media outreach, including the Socially Speaking blog. She has seven years of professional communications experience in both journalism and public relations. 

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors. 

Monday, October 16, 2017

This past week a very cool microsite was released featuring a ton of content from GlassBuild America. The site has 12 Express Learning presentations on it along with videos from the floor and forums. The Glazing Executives Forum video includes the economic forecast piece as well as State of the Industry and 25 years of Top 50 Glaziers. Plus, this site has the keynote address from Cam Marston. This really is an incredible treasure of information and insight. If you were at the show but couldn’t see everything, you can now catch it; and if the weather kept you away, now you can see some of what you missed. Check it out! 

Elsewhere…

  • As if we don’t have enough to worry about with supply and logistics, here’s an article on a shortage of sand. Unreal.  We’ll have to monitor this one because this could affect glass making on a global basis.

  • While I was off from blogging last week, the industry had a great addition. Lindsay and Dustin Price welcomed baby Alex Olivia to the world. A beautiful baby girl born to seriously awesome parents! I am so happy for Lindsay and Dustin and wish them the best. Enjoy it all now, you two. Blink and Alex will be off to college.

  • I was able to attend the Glass + Metal Symposium, and while there I was taken aback (positively) by a video played by Jeff Rigot of Viracon. It was a very well done piece talking about glass usage and the Viracon employee used throughout the video was none other than Cameron Scripture! I have been telling people forever that Cameron has movie-star good looks and obviously the producers of the video agreed! I really now can say I knew him before he went “Hollywood.”

  • The latest Dodge Momentum Index was down again last month, which continues a mini-negative trend on that metric. The analysts are not ready to call this a downturn in the marketplace, but it does bear watching. The market right now does have some soft spots to it for sure. I am very curious to see if this gets revised up or where next month comes in, as traditionally October in many parts of the United States is a very big month with a lot of focus on getting jobs going before the days of winter snow arrive.

  • I think any time I see a link on the new Apple Campus and it shows glass I am all in. This one stopped me in my tracks. Love seeing the way glass is used here and throughout.

  • I did see the sad news of David Stark passing away. I had a few interactions with David as he was developing products in the Vacuum IG world. He surely brought an amazing energy and passion to that space and his efforts and insights will be missed.

  • Last this week, two new mixed-use skyscrapers are coming to Miami. So a question to my friends down there: have we reached the point of massive saturation? I am stunned that these places can go up and units sold. The architecture and glass will be pretty cool on the one described and shown in this story.

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 9, 2017

Thousands of visitors gathered at Fiera Milano Rho in Milan, Italy, last week for Vitrum 2017, where more than 230 exhibitors displayed everything from cutting-edge glass machinery to innovative glass products.

A key theme of this year’s event was Industry 4.0, the next phase of industrial manufacturing that relies on automation, integration and cloud-based technology. "I've seen more than 20 companies on the show floor saying they are [pursuing] Industry 4.0,” said Miika Appelqvist, director of the tempering business unit for Glaston Finland Oy, during a presentation in the “What’s hot in glass processing” seminar at Vitrum.

Industry 4.0 is driving automation and digitalization. It is "removing things that don't add value" from your processes, Appelqvist said. "Industry 4.0 isn't in the future. It is already happening. What are you doing in your processes to get there? How will you be impacted in the future?"

In addition to pursuing Industry 4.0 goals, companies continue to promote machinery and equipment solutions that increase productivity while addressing the glass industry’s continuing labor shortage. “Customers are looking to increase production and do jobs faster, but they don’t have the people,” said Joseph Gates, head of Adelio Lattuada’s new North American business unit. “We introduced a handling robot that has been very big among our customers at the show.”

To see photos and videos from Vitrum 2017, check out the gallery below. For additional coverage, check out Glass Magazine on Twitter, @GlassMag.

Katy Devlin is editor in chief of Glass Magazine. Contact her at kdevlin@glass.org. Follow Glass Magazine on Twitter.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Each year, manufacturers release dozens of smartphone models that boast new, sleek designs and cutting-edge screen displays. But, to claim the title of best smartphone, you know as well as I do, the phone better offer more than industry-leading design specs. If a smartphone doesn’t have good battery life, fit easily into the palm of your hand, have stronger glass than last year’s model, resist water, and sport a camera that’s inching closer to a Canon, it won’t make the best-of-the-best lineup. 

Steve Jobs understood this concept when he said, “Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” As I’ve been reminded with our country’s devastating natural disasters, Steve Jobs' philosophy doesn’t just apply to smartphones and computer tech. It holds equally true in the glazing industry. 

Architects are constantly looking for glazing products that provide both form and function. They don’t like to temper their design aspirations simply because an application is required to meet strict building codes. They also won’t dispute the value of glazing products that meet hurricane-related building codes, fire and life safety requirements and product certifications.

I believe our industry has recognized the design community’s need for products that deliver on both fronts, and we’ve responded with creativity and innovation over the last decade. The trouble is, many design teams are still under the impression that protective glazing products don’t look as good as they perform. 

While there are many reasons this disconnect can occur, I believe one key contributor is architects aren’t aware of the latest protective glazing products. In the last few years alone, we’ve seen a boom in multifunctional glazing products like silicone-glazed fire-rated glazing and design-forward options that meet strict Miami-Date County and state of Florida requirements. They combine performance with style in a way not previously possible. The glazing industry is aware of the value these new products provide. Is the design community? 

Another potential cause of this disconnect is firms aren’t familiar with the level of design support that manufacturers, suppliers and glaziers can provide. When in doubt, they go with what they know works. A recent AIA survey on architect specification supports this conclusion, stating approximately 75 percent of architects reuse specs from previous projects. This doesn’t have to be the case. If glass industry professionals are involved early during the design and specification phase, we can help design teams land on a new solution that achieves both their desired aesthetic and performance goals. 

It’s also important to be our own advocate and show design professionals that we hear their needs and are continuing to rise to the challenge. We’ve made great strides in offering higher performing, design-forward products. As Katy Devlin said so well in her latest Glassblog post, “Time and time again, the building community has looked to the glass industry to develop better performing, safer products that can stand up to unexpected disasters, whether environmental or man-made. And, time and time again, the glass industry has answered that call.” I’d add that we’ve responded to this call on the design front, as well. It is innovation when we provide products that allow people to walk by buildings without realizing the interior or exterior glazing meets strict building codes. Let’s make sure we are promoting it. 

David Vermeulen is the national sales manager for Technical Glass Products (TGP), a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. TGP works closely with architects, designers and other building professionals, providing them with the state-of-the-art products, service and support to maximize design aesthetics and safety in commercial and institutional buildings around the world. Contact him at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, October 2, 2017

The overall business atmosphere is good news/bad news right now. On the good side is a continued positive trend with regards to market conditions, though some regions have hit some soft spots recently, I’m not very worried about that. The area of challenge and concern is two-fold. Between manufacturing issues at one level of our industry and the impact of the run of natural disasters we just experienced, receiving and shipping product is an adventure. I am always stressing communication as a good rule, and I usually really hammer on it when things tighten, so now more than ever making sure everyone is on the same page is crucial. While I have confidence that the needed products can still be purchased, my fear on the trucking and transportation side continues to grow. That side of the world was already thin and now more and more the available carriers are being rightfully called into duty to help those recover from the hurricanes in the last two months. This is going to be a bumpy ride for sure, so again, be proactive and communicate and work closely with everyone up and down the chain for best results.

Elsewhere…

  • When I gave my presentation on social media at GlassBuild America, one of the bigger items I hit on was the use of LinkedIn. Interestingly, that was a sore point for many that commented to me afterwards. My push is that LinkedIn is a must for business and personal. It is a legitimatizing factor, especially when you are trying to build a business or personal brand. But I could see where some took issue. For a few years, LinkedIn lost control, began over emailing with recaps and group news that were not relevant at all. Also as LinkedIn became worldwide, pushes from all over the globe started to fill in and for many those connections or potential connections were also not a major need. If this were 2013, I’d never recommend it. However, in the past two years LinkedIn has really cleaned up its process. You have control over the emails you get and they are not going above and beyond that. The global push has calmed as well. So now it is what it was really meant to be: a very good place to make connections and learn new things and I think you’d agree both of those are pretty good attributes. 

  • The run of 2018 forecasts from the bigger firms will be coming out over the next four to six weeks or so. One of them will be from Construct Connect and their Chief Economist Alex Carrick did a Q&A as a preview. This was an interesting read. He doesn’t see it a rosy as others, which should make these upcoming presentations very interesting. He also covers hurricane effects, etc. 

  • Glass Magazine review time. A few main pieces to check out: the Carl Tompkins article on the “Top 10 Most Common Problems” in the work place is crucial for any manager. The Cam Marston piece on the “Multi Generational Workplace” is excellent and just still bums me out that his speech at GlassBuild was missed by so many. Great insight! Also, the winners of the Glass Magazine Awards are recognized and there are some really impressive projects there. Plus, kudos to YKK AP on the back page story for their investment in our youth. Classy as always, and I come to expect that from Mike Turner and the team there. 

  • The ad of the month was tough as I try to not award the same exact ad twice, so that knocked out a good handful. The winner this month was Assa Abloy and their “Clear Direction” piece, which was a simple layout with their panic front and center and the hot office trend of tons of glass behind it. I don’t know the folks who designed this one, so if you do, pass on my congrats on a job well done!

  • Last this week, just a programming note. No post for next week unless some major news breaks. I’ll be back in my familiar spots for the week of 10/15 and with the end of the year gaining on us…. get ready…. It’s Glass Industry MVP season. Who will take home that insanely prestigious honor?

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 25, 2017

 

“Great, he’s late again. What am I going to do about this? If I don’t do something quickly he will think this is ok, not to mention the other employees. On the other hand, if I am too stern with him he’ll quit. I’m already struggling to keep up and it took me forever to find and train him.”

If this isn’t a conversation that has played out in your mind as a manager, leader or owner in the glass business, then consider yourself fortunate.

The ongoing struggle to find quality employees is an issue that is plaguing trade services across the board, and the glazing industry is no exception. So, how do we offset this issue and make the glass and glazing industry appealing? This is a question I’ve asked glaziers, company owners and association board members. The answers are rarely consistent, except that no one has this figured out.

I don’t either, but here are three simple changes that helped me recruit and retain employees.

  1. It is incredibly important to start by improving the culture of the business. You want to have a culture of positive vibes and a fun atmosphere. The reality is, no one wants to work in a negative, dreadful work environment, and if they do, you probably don’t want them working for you.

  2. After you have established the culture, rolling out an employee-referral program works. Where better for people to hear about how amazing it is to work at your company than from the current employees? Be smart about this and add stipulations that include requiring the new hire to work for three or six months before the referral payment is made.

  3. Another option that can have an immediate impact industry-wide is to encourage your employees to post work-related photos on their social media accounts. Once you have permission from your clients, showing off the pride of the finished product is an amazing thing, whether it’s a finished shower enclosure, commercial storefront, or a crew in a bucket 10 stories up. This can immediately spark interest in the social circles of your employees, likely creating a broader hiring pool for your company as well as the entire industry.

Branding the glazing industry as exciting and fun helps everyone. There’s really not a downside to creating a positive buzz around our trade. Taking ownership of this task can change your business and our industry for the better.

Dustin Anderson is president of Anderson Glass, a glass shop located in Waco, Texas. Contact him at dustin.anderson@andersonglasstexas.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 25, 2017

There was big news that came out of GlassBuild, but all that was going on in the world may have overshadowed it. The announcement that the GANA/NGA discussions have moved to the next level with each organization’s boards unanimously approving a move to combine the two organizations is of gigantic importance. Plain and simple, folks, this is huge and crucial for our industry. To put it into sports terms, the hot trend in the NBA is the building of “super teams” and the combo of GANA and NGA is exactly that for the glass industry. The best attributes of both can combine to offer one defined and strong voice for our industry. This move also will give a clean slate to those of you not involved: this is your chance to start fresh, get involved, have your voice heard.  

Over the next few months you will be hearing a ton more on this, and if you are a member of GANA you will be asked to vote on it. That vote is unlike any other you’ve been asked to cast, so please keep an eye out for it. I am one of the few people out there who has extensive experience with BOTH organizations. I can tell you that the strengths of each match up perfectly, and the combination will be extremely beneficial from the sides of technical, advocacy, education, information and events. I am absolutely open to discussing this with anyone who has any questions, so feel free to contact me. This is a great step for our world, and I salute the boards of both groups for continuing this process.

Elsewhere…

  • Last week, I mentioned the end of show/event season, but I missed a couple of note. If you are in Florida, the Oct. 4 Glass+Metal Symposium is absolutely worthwhile. I am excited to be attending that for the first time ever. Then in November is Greenbuild. I am on record of not being a fan with regards to the expo, and I’ll keep to that. Also in November, the Glass+Interiors Symposium and with the interior space so hot, this one will be interesting for sure. Overall, my focus though is on BEC next March. With the way time is flying, that will be here in a snap.

  • I’ve been excited to see more folks in our industry jump on various forms of social media, the latest being DeGorter with a very enjoyable Instagram feed. Please follow Pete deGorter, who is doing a nice job with sharing some fabulous images that really reach the inner glass geek in me. 

  • The latest Architectural Billings Index is out and once again it’s in the plus territory. There is no doubt this index has been on a heck of a roll and specifically the nonresidential side is really encouraging. I will admit I am trying to contain my giddiness. I had a good friend and co-worker mention to me in the past that these indexes can sometimes not mimic real life. But so far, all indications are positive, so I am staying on my happy course here.

  • Very interesting news on the San Francisco football stadium and the possibility of them looking to add some sort of shading because the one side of the field bakes in the hot California sun. I’m continually blown away about outdoor stadiums failing the orientation test and knowing where the sun will be hitting during various events and times. It’s incredible what $1 billion doesn’t cover these days.

  • Last, check out my video of the week. I mentioned on my previous post about Guardian Glass and their video roll out at GlassBuild. It’s really an impressive and fun piece featuring what I consider the best production value (aside from being a glass geek I am an ex-TV producer who still misses that business) I have ever seen from our industry. Again, kudos to all involved.

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 18, 2017

GlassBuild America 2017 is now complete and I can honestly say this year's event was unlike any of the others I have attended. The weather scenario surely played an unexpected role in how things would unfold. In the end, I think the experience was more positive than many could have expected when the forecast targeted Atlanta for the day before the show opened (and the day most people would arrive).

There were great stories of people who were so determined to get there they had to rebook flights multiple times or had to fly to cities near Atlanta and drive in. But once attendees arrived, they were greeted with two great days of weather and a jam-packed floor that raised the bar once again in regards to exhibits and product offerings.

Thank you to all who attended and exhibited. Your efforts were truly appreciated and I hope you benefit greatly from it.   

So, now to my annual look at the things I liked and noticed and the people I ran into along the way:

Note that I was not as active on the floor as I have been in the past because I spent a lot of time at the Window & Door Dealer Days. While that took me away from some of the action, I learned a ton there and was blown away by the content and collaboration.

There is no doubt that oversized and interior glass is hot right now. I was impressed by the focus on those categories from the product, component and machinery side. Speaking of machinery, each year seeing the advancements really gets me going. Glass equipment both from fabricating and installation keeps getting smarter and faster. I also liked the concentration on safety with regards to the installation equipment being shown. 

In terms of booths, exhibitors are not messing around. They take this event seriously and their exhibits show it. Some are more artistic or graphically pleasing incorporating product (Vitro, Guardian, Lisec, Bohle, M3, HHH, Quanex), while others come straight at you with their wares, cutting to the chase (IGE, C.R. Laurence, Matodi, Gardner). But in the end, it was truly an impressive display of approaches to brand and product.

For me, the networking is always the key and being able to catch up with the best and brightest in our world is quite frankly a thrill. I got to spend time pre-show with Rob Struble of Vitro and I still hope his marketing acumen will rub off on me someday. It was great to spend a few minutes with Tom O’Malley of Clover Architectural, and then to be able to see his amazing product in action at the new Mercedes Benz Stadium was very cool. I only get to see Rob Botman and Jordan Richards from Glassopolis once per year, so I try to take advantage of that, plus I loved that they brought out one of their classic campaigns for their booth background. Well done, men! 

I mention this every year, but even if I only get to spend 30 seconds with the brilliant PR/Marketing/Communication gurus Rich Porayko and Heather West, I am grateful. It was great to see Dan Polling from Schott, and he still could pass for a double for actor James Franco. I love getting time with Mike Synon and Terry Hessom from HHH. Though, Mike always had a line of people waiting to see him, so next year I’ll have to make an appointment. I am glad Dustin Anderson of Anderson Glass made it over for the show, and it is always cool to see what’s popping in his world. That guy does great things for our industry.

I was happy to get a few minutes with Darijo Babic of Guardian; his energy and passion for the craft is top notch. And on the subject of top notch and Guardian, I have always had that respect for Chris Dolan and it was good to see him and spend some time. The video and product release that Chris and the gang had was extremely impressive. The production value was off the charts. Serious kudos to everyone who had a part in that effort.

Chris Fronsoe from ICD was among one of the folks who had to drive in from a regional airport, and yet despite the length of trip and adventure, he still was the best-dressed person at the show. I’m always delighted to visit with the great Shelly Farmer of SC Railing.  She introduced me to Scott Rowe of Rowe Fenestration, and that was appreciated greatly. Good guy and was pretty cool of him to tweet out a picture of us on the floor--loved the use of social media! I also met the impressive duo of Jessica Olander and Katie Tarka. They manage the Connecticut and Massachusetts Glass Dealers and I loved how active they were in trying to learn more for their membership and help those groups advance. 

Finally, social media was a big star of the show. More and more people continue to use it and the communication from it became more important with the need to get out information, timing etc. I was honored to be asked to do an Express Learning session on social media, and it was admittedly one of the neater things I have gotten to do in my business life. I can now cross off “speak at GlassBuild” from the bucket list!

So we now look forward to the 2018 show and there’s a lot to expect. I’ll hit on that next week and I’ll also cover the exciting news of GANA and NGA. That is HUGE and great news for our world.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 18, 2017

There was a sense of optimistic uncertainty as GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window & Door Expo opened its doors just a day after Hurricane Irma, then downgraded to a tropical depression, moved through western Georgia and into Alabama. Uncertainty coupled with determination to make the event—no matter the circumstances—worthwhile for exhibitors and attendees. And while the storm caused travel delays and forced some attendees to stay home, the event served as a prime display of the current strength of the North American glass and glazing industry. Exhibitors filled the floor with new advancements and innovations, and attendees came looking to invest.  

“What was shaping up to be the second largest GlassBuild in its history, was thrown a curve ball when first Hurricane Harvey hit in Texas, and then Hurricane Irma hit Florida and Georgia just days before the show. Not surprisingly, those events took a toll on the exhibits and attendance number, but the industry’s resilience and passion made sure the show was far from a wash out,” show organizers said in a statement. The event hosted 458 exhibiting companies occupying 180,395 net square feet on the show floor, and just under 6,000 attendees. 

Check out daily news from the show floor, and listen to industry voices discuss successes and challenges.

GlassBuild America 2017 Opens

GlassBuild America Offers Learning Resources, Extended Hours on Day Two

GlassBuild Closes Strong on Day Three

 

 

Bethany Stough is managing editor of Glass Magazine. Contact her at bstough@glass.org.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Ours is an industry ready to step up. Never has this been more apparent than this week, as the country reflects on the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and as Hurricane Irma, now a tropical storm, continues to make its mark on the southern United States.

Time and time again, the building community has looked to the glass industry to develop better performing, safer products that can stand up to unexpected disasters, whether environmental or man-made. And, time and time again, the glass industry has answered that call, making improvements and introducing products designed to protect property and, more importantly, save lives.

The first major shift toward protective glazing products came in 1992, after Hurricane Andrew roared across southern Florida as a Category 5 storm. The hurricane caused an estimated $26.5 billion in damage, killed 23 and displaced nearly a quarter-million people in the United States alone, and the building industry looked to the glass and fenestration industries to make sure that same destruction from wind-borne debris could not happen again. “In 1992, Hurricane Andrew changed the way the industry looked at fenestration systems,” said Joe Schiavone, director of sales for C.R. Laurence Co., crl-arch.com, in an April article about impact glazing systems.

The next push for protective glazing came after the Oklahoma City Bombing in 1995, and then again after the 9/11 attacks in 2001. After these terror events, the industry was asked to bring live-saving product improvements to buildings outside of hurricane areas. “We were behind as a nation in regard to [blast systems], but now it would be in the forefront of our industry,” said Andy Canter, president of Ridgeview Glass in an article from June 2017. “We had to learn the requirements of such systems, from engineering through installation, overnight, to meet the changing needs of construction.”

The glass and glazing industry has stepped up to make buildings safer in the United States, and this week makes that clear. The destruction Hurricane Irma caused this week across Florida, where the toughest of hurricane codes have been implemented, would surely have been worse without the correct installation of hurricane-impact glazing.  As the region recovers from the storm, the building community will take stock of how structures performed and will bring fresh challenges to glass and glazing companies to keep making products better. And the industry, once again, will step up. 

Katy Devlin is editor in chief of Glass Magazine. Contact her at kdevlin@glass.org. Follow Glass Magazine on Twitter.

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