glassblog

Monday, September 11, 2017

GlassBuild America is finally here, though it’s under very unique and special circumstances thanks to Hurricane Irma. Because the forecasted path of the storm included Atlanta (for a few days, but as of the 5 p.m. update on 9/10, it does not), it’s made the run up to the show much different than normal. Instead of people studying the exhibitor lists, making meeting plans, and cleaning up their work at home before departing, they are monitoring the weather trying to determine what exactly is expected for the area. So obviously with the damage that this hurricane has already done, and the fresh images in our minds from Harvey in Texas, there are some folks who have decided to stay back.

I probably have not handled people cancelling well. It’s mostly because I love this show (full disclosure, I do work for the show), and I know how hard everyone works all year long to get ready. And just as important, I know first-hand the incredible commitment the exhibitors make to do this event. I obviously want the best experience possible for all involved. Trust me, I am not frustrated with the people deciding not to come; I respect those decisions to stay back but my angst is all about the overall situation. (Weather + Timing = Awful) In the end, I need to keep perspective. This storm is doing massive life-changing damage and that is surely more meaningful of my energy, thoughts, prayers and support. The show will go on this week, and it will be back in Vegas in 2018 ready again, as always, to be that crucial part to our industry.

If you are not able to attend or had to cancel, please follow along on social media. You can follow GlassBuild on their Facebook and Twitter feeds. Also, Glass Magazine and Window and Door Magazine will have continuous coverage on social media. In addition, there will be many other media outlets at the show and providing coverage as well. You can still stay connected. Plus, I may do a Periscope or Tweet-storm myself.

Here’s a quick list to connect: 

If you are coming to the show, please download the GlassBuild America app. If you have downloaded in the past, you need to delete those versions and download the new one Click here for more info.

Some pre-show thoughts from the tradeshow floor, I am really impressed by the overall size. It is the biggest and most impressive tradeshow floor I have seen in many years. In some past years, I could zip from end-to-end pretty quickly; that will not be the case this year. I was also impressed by some of the exhibits as they were coming together. Once again, the creativity going into this has been strong. The annual Best in Show competition will be tough on the judges!  

I also loved seeing so many of the loyal companies who come here year after year in support of the industry. I know I will miss some (and I am sorry), but people like FeneTech, C.R. Laurence, Guardian, Bohle, MyGlassTruck, HHH Tempering, Vitro, Forel, GGI and IGE are here. Then there’s a ton of companies that I have always either read about or saw at other events that are showing this time. And last, we have folks that are back here after a few years away. It’s a very interesting and diverse floor.

I am here and ready. The weather for the first day may be windy and rainy, but after that it looks positive and I am excited to see what happens. Next week, I will have my complete recap including my favorites and people who I ran into and sadly may have missed.

Read on for links and video of the week...

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 4, 2017

GlassBuild America is the epicenter for glass industry education. Don’t take my word for it; ask industry enthusiast and expert—and all around good guy—Max Perilstein. Manufacturers and glass professionals alike attend to see what’s new, to size each other up, reconnect with colleagues, and to learn. We learn about your needs, you learn about our offering, and whether  it adds value to your business. Together we strategize how to collaborate, leveraging each others' strengths to tackle projects per the spec and by the budget, ultimately increasing profitability. 

GlassBuild America takes the education element to the next level by offering Express Learning sessions. These brief, yet informative segments address the key business and product trends affecting your company.

I was honored to have Glass Magazine invite C.R. Laurence to give a presentation on glass railings in the Express Learning Theater. Glass railings present our industry with a problematic gray area in terms of code compliance and misinterpretations. We’re not taking it lightly, and are flying in two of our heavy hitters for the event. Chris Hanstad collaborated directly with the International Code Council to spearhead the first-and-only ICC-approved base shoe system for glass guardrails. Paul Daniels has 30 years of glass industry experience under his belt, and has helped (literally) write the book for GANA standards. Both are CSI, CDT certified, and will demystify code compliance. We will address the areas that put your projects, your reputation, your company, and the life and safety of people at risk.

The presentation will cover everything you need to know to enter and compete in the glass railings market:

  • Impact of 2015 IBC updates
  • Testing standards and load requirements
  • Dry glazing vs.  wet glazing
  • Laminated glass edge considerations
  • Cap rail requirements
  • Interlayer types and benefits/concerns
  • Role of the ICC and ICC-ES evaluation reports

Join us on day two of  GlassBuild America, Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 1 p.m., in the Express Learning Theater. If you can’t make it to the show, follow @GlassMag on Twitter for a live stream. Join the conversation by tagging @CRLaurence and using hashtags #ExpressLearning and #GlassBuild. See you in Atlanta!

Andrew Haring is vice president of marketing for C.R. Laurence Co.-U.S. Aluminum. Contact him at andrew_haring@crlaurence.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Here at FeneTech, we’re engineers by trade, but we wouldn’t be the company we are if we weren’t also dreamers. We’re currently working to turn one such dream into reality. Dream along with us.

Imagine that as a glass fabricator or a window manufacturer

  • Your machinery could tell you when to plan scheduled downtime maintenance in real-time.
  • All machinery in your plant, regardless of manufacturer, communicated in the same exact way, eliminating the need for proprietary interfaces.
  • You have the ability to receive alerts and alarms from this centralized system so that you can manage by exception rather than by monitoring everything individually.
  • Your ERP system could dynamically adjust your plant capacity and lead times based on real-time machine performance, not theoretical assumptions that once set are rarely changed.
  • Your ERP system could automatically create and issue purchase orders for needed machine parts in a just-in-time fashion.
  • Environmental conditions in your plant could be monitored and alerts provided as necessary based on temperatures, humidity or other variables.

As a machinery manufacturer

  • You could view the operational status of all your machinery in the field by customer or by product type.
  • You could proactively schedule service calls based on real-time, in-the-field analysis of machinery.
  • You could proactively schedule the shipment of required machine parts and eliminate “rush” orders.
  • Your machinery could send you alerts when it is being operated outside of warranty conditions.

As a components manufacturer or supplier

  • You could easily see the inventory levels of all the materials you supply by region or customer.
  • You could easily see the forecasted requirements of the materials you supply by region or customer.
  • You could proactively schedule the shipment of materials to customers based on this data.
  • By analyzing real-world, real-time forecasts, you could see the future.

The way to turn these visions into reality is to develop a baseline communication standard that will allow all machinery, software and suppliers to talk the same language. FeneTech is taking the initiative to lead an industry standard that we’re calling FENml. FENml (fenestration manufacturing language) provides the backbone for these dreams and the foundation for bringing to life the concepts of the Industrial Internet of Things and Industry 4.0.

FeneTech is hosting informational meetings on this initiative at GlassBuild America in Atlanta on September 12 and 13. Please contact us for details and register to attend.

Join us and share in the excitement of turning this dream into reality.

Ron Crowl is president of FeneTech Inc. Contact him at ron.crowl@fenetech.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, September 4, 2017

My thoughts are still with everyone affected and disrupted by Hurricane Harvey. I’m in awe over the amount of rain and damage the storm did in such a short time. Now we have Irma churning out at sea that may come our way next. After a few quieter years, it looks like hurricane seasons are back. For those who are in recovery mode, and those who may be in the path of the next storm or storms, hang in there. And if you have not donated to any of the Houston campaigns out there, please consider it. The recovery for many is going to take a very long time and they’ll need all the help they can get.

Elsewhere…

  • I’m a month behind in my Glass Magazine reviews, so this is a look at the August issue that features the sharp black and white photos on the cover. Obviously, the main push is a fantastic and thorough preview of GlassBuild America. That area is a must review for all participants. There are also excellent pieces in the issue from David Vermeulen of TGP and Matt Johnson of the Gary Law Firm. Plus, the piece on prismatic glass was intriguing to me. Check it all out. Once again, worth your time.
  • The ad of the month was a tough one because this issue was loaded. But the winner was Pulp Studio and the “Perception vs. Reality” piece. It was a smart use of art, text and theme. Props to Bernard Lax and team on that one.
  • Another note on GlassBuild America, the last day, which provides the amazing opportunity to see me speak on social media, will also feature the end-of-show reception/party. That event will be a good way to blow off some steam and also win some great prizes. Overall, I am expecting three fabulous days at the show and can’t wait to see everyone there!
  • The glass industry had a quick hit on a great documentary recently. In the ESPN 30 for 30 “What Carter Lost,” there was a brief archived clip of the signage of Oak Cliff Glass & Mirror from 1988. Not sure if that sign or location still exists, but cool to see since Oak Cliff Glass & Mirror is one of the better known brands in the glazing community in Texas. I’m such a glass geek that a sign from a company fires me up.
  • Recently, I wrote about some marketing maneuvers in our industry I was not a fan of. Another one is using the entire square footage of the actual building space to promote where the glass was installed, not the actual openings. They don’t mention the actual usage of glass square footage, so it’s a way to float a big number out there that truly isn’t associated with the actual material supplied and installed. Basically, if I supplied a door lite to the AT&T Stadium in Dallas, I could write a PR that notes my glass went into this amazing 3 million-square-foot project (even though the actual glass was only one opening, probably 16 square feet). Hopefully people are smart enough to read through these sort of games, but you never know.
  • Last this week, the battle for gaining quality workers continues, and I saw a new approach that caught my eye. A window company here in Michigan is giving away $500 Amazon gift cards just for interviewing! I have to assume there’s some sort of catch, but I gotta think they’ll surely get some people in the door. No doubt it’s tough to find people, so desperate times call for some desperate measures.

Read on for links and video of the week…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Is it better to wait until change is forced upon you, or to be an active participant in creating the new normal? Those constructing new markets see excess profits, then these new markets become standard, and many more arrive looking to ride the wave. Even with flocks of new companies looking to capitalize, the earliest adopters are best positioned and typically continue to prosper. A textbook example, the iPhone. It doesn’t appear waiting for change to be forced on you is the answer. If you’re waiting, you probably have already been left behind.

In the glass world, market leaders embrace change, especially using ever-changing technology. They’re using technology to create entirely new markets, producing new opportunity for their businesses. For example, the progression of smart products like electrochromic and dynamic glass are becoming an economical solution with an almost endless list of applications.

Additionally, the new International Building Code dictates that glass in handrails, guardrails or guarded section must be constructed of laminated tempered or laminated heat-strengthen glass, unless there is no walking surface below or the walking surface is permanently protected. This was updated years ago, yet we’re awaiting implementation across our market. Many companies are preparing ahead, looking at laminating solutions to complement their current tempering capabilities. Still, my experience is a lot more are dragging their feet because, as of now, these codes are not a requirement in most markets.

If you’re dragging your feet, consider this: tempered glass is strong, but not unbreakable. The next time you’re in an airport, mall or even a multi-level lobby, make note of the amount of glass handrails you see, specifically those with a possibility of someone walking unprotected below. If a panel on the third floor breaks, glass falls onto people below, and a gaping hole in the balustrade is practically begging a child to see if their body will fit through. With the addition of lamination to the code, we ensure this scenario does not happen. If this code were mandated tomorrow, would your business be able to reasonably bid these jobs? I see an enormous opportunity for those ready to capitalize. What do you see when you look at all this glass?

With GlassBuild America 2017 rapidly approaching, make the most of the opportunity. You will be in the presence of those creating the changes for the future, and those with experience working in new markets. Take time to speak with them. With symposiums and learning sessions each day, you can focus on upcoming changes that will affect your business. Take time to identify trends and study them; knowing these allows you to be prepared or even to become the next game changer. Do you want to be a follower into a new market or one of the leaders? The latter is where I am looking to be!

Pete de Gorter is vice president of sales and marketing at DeGorter Inc. Contact him at pete@degorter.com. Pete will be presenting an Express Learning session on machinery purchasing during GlassBuild America. Attend his presentation on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 3 p.m., to learn more.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

 

Monday, August 28, 2017

A lot of news, but first and foremost, my thoughts are out to everyone affected by Hurricane Harvey. That was/is a challenging storm and hoping for only the best for those in its path today and going forward.

In the glass world, it’s been a tough week on the float side. The market is relatively busy right now, save for some soft spots here and there, so the need for glass is pretty high. Unfortunately, some events at the float level have me very concerned about capacity, and so thus comes the warning. (Katy Devlin had a fantastic take on it here.) Glass is tight now and going to get tighter. This is the time to get as organized as you can and understand your supply chains and the future orders you need to fill. Proactivity is a must. This is also a massive reason why you need to attend GlassBuild America in a few weeks because if you are not networking and communicating, you will be left behind. I will be monitoring this glass supply issue and will continue to report when relevant. And yes, I know I am more reactionary than others out there, but I’d rather be safe than sorry.

Elsewhere…

 

  • A few weeks ago, I mentioned another big glass deal was coming and that happened publicly last week with Glass Dynamics being sold to Press Glass. Obviously, the interesting angle here is the parent company of Press is in Europe so this is a new player having a location in the North American fabrication market. Press has a great reputation in the areas they are already in, so there’s a positive from the market standpoint.
  • Congrats to Martin Bracamonte on his new position as president of IGE Glass Technologies. Michael Spellman built a strong team over there, and he’ll obviously still be involved, but adding Martin as the president was an excellent move. He’s a good and talented person.
  • And while I am in the congratulatory mood, props to the folks at Conners Sales. They launched a fabulous new website last week. Really impressive work and great examples of the lines they represent.
  • The latest Architectural Billings Index was released this week and once again it was in the positive. That’s now six straight months on the good side of the ledger and overall a pretty amazing run over the last 2-plus years. All of the other indexes that are tracked (regional and new inquiries) were up as well.
  • I’m a big “smart roads” guy and look forward to seeing if and how this works. The next area for testing is in Kansas City along with two other to-be-determined sites. Really curious to see how this holds up in a climate like KC.
  • Last this week, college football is now back… can’t wait…. One of the first college games of the year will be held at the new stadium in Atlanta. (Which you can view close up when you attend GlassBuild America.) Architectural Digest got a tour and broke it all down.

 

Read on for links and video of the week… 

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Now in its sixth year, the Glass Magazine Top Metal Companies list spotlights the largest metal fabrication companies in North America. Highlighted in the November issue of Glass Magazine, the Top Metal Companies include those that manufacture, fabricate and sell curtain wall, storefront and entrance, commercial interior and exterior railings, aluminum composite panels and exterior sun-control products to the glass and glazing industry.

While the Top Metal Companies list ranks companies by sales volume, it will also provide timely information regarding the state of the metals market as a whole, based on market statistics related to sales volume, product demand and acquisition plans.

The 2017 list will showcase the successes, challenges, changes and opportunities within the commercial metals industry. Featuring specific metal company achievements, including recent projects, the list provides an up-to-date look at the metal industry landscape.

If your company belongs on the Top Metal Companies list, be sure to complete the survey by Sept. 5, and contact me if you have any questions about participating.

Bethany Stough is managing editor of Glass Magazine, write her at bstough@glass.org.  

Monday, August 21, 2017

There are a lot of people pointing fingers over who is liable for the devastating Grenfell Tower fire tragedy.

The public says Arconic Inc., the maker of Reynobond, which is used on the tower, is at fault. Arconic says blame lies with the specification team. “We sold our products with the expectation that they would be used in compliance with the various and different local building codes and regulations,” said the company in a statement. The specification team could now very well say inadequate U.K. building codes and regulations are at fault. Code officials might then point to the National Fire Protection Association or testing agencies like Underwriters Laboratories.

While it’s easy to follow suit and point fingers, we’d be better served to learn what we can from the Grenfell Tower tragedy. No one wants to see this scenario replicated in the glazing industry. People rely on building industry professionals to create safe, long-lasting buildings, and the glazing industry plays a key role in this process.

One of the first things we need to address is collaboration. 

Technology is helping on this front, but our industry still faces a fragmented approach to design.

  • Safety requirements, deflection limitations and insulating requirements, to name a few, vary nationally, regionally and sometimes even locally. 
  • Buildings are also growing increasingly complex. This means more parties are involved in the design and specification process.

Early and frequent collaboration between the trades is now crucial to ensure safety requirements and project complexities are well understood and properly addressed.

For example, while BIM systems and modelling software have come a long way in the last decade, it’s still important to work with the design team to ensure the selected materials not only achieve the look the architect is after, but deliver on the safety front. This is particularly true since the installation of safety glazing materials can differ from standard applications.

  • Will the glazing system require more technical support or onsite custom work?
  • Will it need additional testing?
  • Are the expectations realistic?

By joining conversations early during the design phase, we can provide quick answers and aid in the safety and long-term outcome of buildings.

We also need to take ahold of the responsibility that comes with being glass experts. Architects rely on us for advice. It’s not our job to create a spec, but if we see a problem, we need to alert the design team about suitable alternatives. They simply may not be aware of all the options.

Regardless of where you fit within the supply chain, it’s impossible to put a value on human lives. This includes the assessment of design benefits versus cost when deciding whether to deviate from the specification. The cheapest option may end up being the most expensive down the road. Look for any special requirements, limitations or exclusions, and be sure to vet manufacturer claims. Safety is a small price to pay when creating buildings that protect the lives of others. 

David Vermeulen is the national sales manager for Technical Glass Products, a supplier of fire-rated glass and framing systems, and other specialty architectural glazing. TGP works closely with architects, designers and other building professionals, providing them with the state-of-the-art products, service and support to maximize design aesthetics and safety in commercial and institutional buildings around the world. Contact him at 800/426-0279.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 21, 2017

With GlassBuild America only three weeks away, I wanted to dedicate this week’s post to the show. This is usually the time that many make their final decision on whether or not to attend. I know mostly everyone is very busy, but if you want to improve yourself and your business, you should make the call to be in Atlanta on Sept. 12 to 14. Here are few reasons why…

Overall Education

This is a one-stop wonderland for everything you want to know with regards to product, equipment, services and more. Below I will break out a few channels where you can gain critical knowledge and insights. There is something for everyone no matter what end of the business you are in.

  • Glazing Executives Forum
    The collaboration here is incredible. For a glazier, this is invaluable. Also, the economic forecast and the state of the industry pieces are very helpful. Plus, a special 25 years of Top 50 Glazier survey review will be quite interesting.

  • Express Learning
    These 20-minute sessions are perfect for quick on-the-go information and with every speaker easily accessible you can always reach out for more later. There are great topics and speakers scheduled and I’m looking forward to sessions hosted by C.R. Laurence, Quanex, YKK and GED. Also, I am humbled and honored to have a spot speaking on Thursday, Sept. 14, a dream come true for me to speak at the show!

  • Cam Marston
    Keynote speaker open to all attendees. Those who saw him in the past raved about the lessons he brought. Well worth your time. His talk on the multi-generational workplace is something that is fresh and important to grasp and understand. 

Networking

Packed floor with a large attendee base expected means a ton of potential connections all in one place. It is simply the best opportunity to meet suppliers and customers and get to know potential targets on both.

In-booth Demonstrations

This is something that you get by walking the floor. There are always demonstrations happening and you learn as you go. I know the team from Bohle America will have a ton happening and newcomers to the show like Glass Renu promise to impress with hands-on demonstrations that will surely give you ideas and angles for your business.

Machinery

Last but not least, there’s the machinery angle. Every player in our world will be represented and they all come with their best foot forward. GlassBuild unfairly gets a rap that it’s more of a machinery show than anything else. But that’s not exactly the case. The reason people think that is the machinery guys come with amazing exhibits and machines tuned up and working. It’s eye catching and impressive. I fully expect those booths to be very busy because right now it seems like everyone is looking to replace and/or expand what they have. This includes glazing installation equipment all the way to fabrication machinery. It’s all there.

In the end, I know you are busy. And the thought of spending a day or two out of the office is frightening. But this event brings the best of the best in our industry and supplies you with the information and networking that makes you better. I believe that is surely worth your time! 

If you have any questions or need more insight on the show, please reach out to me. I am always glad to help!

Read this post on the From the Fabricator blog…

Max Perilstein is founder of Sole Source Consultants, a consulting firm for the building products industry that specializes in marketing, branding, communication strategy and overall reputation management, as well as website and social media, and codes and specifications.E-mail him at MaxP@SoleSourceConsultants.com.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Here’s my narrative approach to the slow transformation and integration of BIM software and tools:

“I’ve been doing this for 30 years and never needed BIM to visualize exterior cladding transitions or conflicts.”

“I’m not sure why they want a BIM model. You can quote it, but I think it is going away.”

“They want a REVIT model for record, but it can be done after the shop drawings. Do the shops in AutoCAD first.”

“This REVIT and BIM thing is getting some traction, so we are going to have to release you on the BIM work, but it seems like a waste of the owner’s money.”

“Hey, the architect and GC want a coordinated model to provide to the owner, so I need you guys to provide a BIM model, and weekly or bi-weekly BIM coordination meetings.”

“This project is actually being executed in REVIT and all of the subs are required to use REVIT for their elevations, plans and sections. Make sure you’ve designed a deliverable that incorporates this, and review the architect’s expected LOD and qualify anything you think is not necessary.”

“I think we are going to have to use REVIT and RHINO at the same time on this project to model the crazy geometry. Make sure to coordinate teams and integrate both in developing your details.”

I may be one of the “old guys,” having started in 1984 when drafting boards were still in use, but I also happen to keep innovation in plain sight, and support implementation of new technologies. It’s a “must-do” in my position. In fact, isn’t innovation the foundation to a sustainable company (“innovate or die”)?

I saw BIM coming quite a few years ago and informed those at my organization that we needed to make the investment in a BIM person and the technology. It took time, but we did it. We needed a person that understood the technology first, and could learn what they needed to know about cladding systems.

We had no idea what we were doing, but we hired a committed and talented BIM specialist that really understood the “gear” and cared about the work. We quoted, scoped, developed, finally defining a delivery method and cost paradigm that got traction. There were gaps, big and small, between projects, but gradually, the gaps decreased. More and more architects, GCs and related firms started using REVIT and other tools to collaborate on projects, making the switch to BIM software.

Today, we have specialists in AutoCAD with curtain wall experience, young and old, we have RHINO specialists, REVIT Specialists, along with others that know Inventor and related tools. Project work involves integrating these specialists and knowledge workers on various projects, depending on the scope of work. There is no longer one delivery method. Multiple methods are required depending on the project, architect, client, location, size, scale and geometry.

The change is still taking place; it’s still emerging. I believe we’ve barely begun to tap the technology and really define its best use. Too often we take “old thinking” and try to apply it to new ways, new means and new methods. BIM is a way of thinking, not just a “drawing program.” It has embedded information; intelligence built into the model. Information and details are extracted from it, not drawn into it. This intelligence should be leveraged more and more as hardware and software continue to advance.

And I’m confident that while we are all working in the current software platforms, some developer is creating the next generation of BIM software for building design and construction. The only thing we can be sure of is change. And if we don’t change, someday we’ll look up, wonder how the new technology took root, and it’ll be too late to “flip the switch.”

John Wheaton is the founder & co-owner of Wheaton & Sprague Engineering, Inc., also known as Wheaton Sprague Building Envelope. The firm provides full service design, engineering and consulting services for the curtain wall/building envelope/building enclosure industry, and works at “Creating Structure” for clients. He can be reached at jwheaton@wheatonsprague.com and on Twitter, @JohnLWheaton1.

The opinions expressed here are those of the individual author and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Glass Association, Glass Magazine editors, or other glassblog contributors.

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